Posts Tagged With: Spirit

Conjuring of Spirits

Conjuring of Spirits

Timing:

Waxing Moon or Full Moon

Waning or New Moon

 

Items You Will Need:

Two tall purple candles

Two tall green candles

A purple Amethyst

Green Jade or Agate – in center of altar

Sandalwood & Lavender Incense

Sandalwood & Willow Bark Incense

Spirit Candle 
  
 Instructions:

Cast a triple circle. Conjuring of Spirits is always done in hours of darkness, not necessary to be midnight, but preferred.

After you have performed your primary ritual, cast the incense into your burner, Place the Spirit Candle into the center of the altar and say: 

“Spirit of good will, I bid thee enter

The Outer Circle.

The Second Circle.

The Inner Circle. 

I am protected by this Pentacle upon my breast.

Which bears the name of (your Spirit Guide)

I bid thee, Spirit, Reveal thy Earthly name! 
 

(turn slowly deosil as you speak) 

Repeat this conjuration three times. 

Perform a nine card Tarot Divination for the Spirit’s name, unless the Spirit replies in some other manner. 

Ask: Have you a message for me?

Perform ATarot Divination or use the Witches’ Bowl to ask questions. 

Spirit, is it true that….? 

Deal gently with the friendly Spirits and they will lead you to the Greater Mysteries. 

During your questioning, observe the Spirit Candle. If it wavers or rises and falls, or flickers unevenly, use the Tarot to see if the Spirit has a message. 

You may ask 3 questions, after that you must ask: 

May I seek further guidance? 

Ask only 3 more questions. 

Bid the Spirit depart, saying: 

(Name), Good Spirit,

Thou hast diligently answered my questions and I do thank thee. I hereby give thee license to depart. Depart, thrice – blessed Spirit, and be thou willing to return when next I conjure thee. By the sound of this bell(Use your Witche’s Bell), do I bie thee leave. Depart, Depart. Depart!

 

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Practice and Method of the Shaman

Practice and Method of the Shaman

 

The shaman plays the role of healer in shamanic societies; shamans gain knowledge and power by traversing the axis mundi and bringing back knowledge from the heavens. Even in western society, this ancient practice of healing is referenced by the use of the caduceus as the symbol of medicine.

Oftentimes the shaman has, or acquires, one or more familiar helping entities in the spirit world; these are often spirits in animal form, spirits of healing plants, or (sometimes) those of departed shamans. In many shamanic societies, magic, magical force, and knowledge are all denoted by one word, such as the Quechua term yachay.

While the causes of disease are considered to lie in the realm of the spiritual, being effected by malicious spirits or Witchcraft, spiritual methods as well as what we would consider physical methods are used to heal. The shaman often will enter the body of their patient to find the spirit making the patient sick, and heal by removing the infectious spirit by the patient.

However, many shamans have expert knowledge of the plant life in their area, and an herbal regimine is often perscribed as treatment. In many places, the shamans claim to learn from the plants directly, only being able to determine the effects of a plant and use it to heal after meeting the spirit of the plant and getting permission.

In South America, individual spirits are called through singing icaros; to call the spirit, the spirit must teach you their song.

The use of totem items such as rocks is common; these items are believed to have special powers and an animating spirit.

Such practices are presumably very ancient; in circa 368 bc, Plato wrote in the Phaedrus that the “first prophecies were the words of an oak”, and that everyone who lived at that time found it rewarding enough to “listen to an oak or a stone, so long as it was telling the truth”.

The belief in witchcraft and sorcery, known as brujeria in South America, is prevalent in many shamanic societies.

Some societies distinguish shamans who cure from sorcerers who harm; others believe that all shamans have the power to both cure and kill; that is, shamans are in some societies also thought of as being capable of harm. The shaman usually enjoys great power and prestige in the community, renowned for their powers and knowledge; but they may also be suspected of harming others and thus feared.

In engaging in this work the shaman exposes himself to significant personal risk, from the spirit world, from any enemy shamans, as well as from the means employed to alter his state of consciousness. Certain of the plant materials used can kill, and the out-of-body journey itself can lead to non-returning and physical death; spells of protection are common, and the use of more dangerous plants is usually very highly ritualized.

Shamanic technology

Generally, the shaman traverses the axis mundi and enters the spirit world by effecting a change of consciousness in himself, entering into an ecstatic trance, either autohypnotically or through the use of entheogens. The methods used are diverse, and often are used in conjunction with each other.

Some of the methods for effecting such altered states of consciousness are:

  • Drumming
  • Singing
  • Fasting
  • Sweat lodge
  • Vision quests /or vigils,
  • Dancing or Spinning Games

 

Power Plants

  • Tobacco
  • Fly Agaric
  • Psychedelic Mushrooms Alluded to euphemistically as “holy children” by Mazatec shamans such as Maria Sabina
  • Peyote
  • San Pedro Named thus (St. Peter) by Andean natives because he’s the guardian of Gates of Heaven
  • Ayahuasca Quechua for “Vine of the Dead”
  • Iboga

 

 

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Let’s Talk Witch – Spirit Summoning Spells

Witchy Comments & Graphics

Let’s Talk Witch – Spirit Summoning Spells

Straightforward methods exist as well as more complex ones there are a lot of ways. Ancient theurgists used to call spirits with spinning tops. Some spirits respond if their name is called while others only respond to elaborate spells and rituals. It’s possible to summon generic “benevolent” spirits or summon a specific one by name. It is usually wisest to know exactly whom you’re summoning.
Some traditions consider that it’s safest or necessary to contact a gatekeeper spirit who will then summon the actual spirit for you. Essentially you are summoning a spirit to summon spirits for you. Although whether you choose to do this depends largely upon the tradition you follow, it is a wise practice if you are in the habit of summoning “generic” spirits. Summoning spirits without being very familiar with their identity and personality is a little like living in a very busy metropolis, throwing your front door open and inviting just anyone to enter. Always remember that, as with any guest, it’s easier to invite them in than to ask them to leave.
Elegba

Exu

Hecate

Hermes

Maria Padilha Pomba Gira
These spirits guard the crossroads, permitting and denying access as they deem fit.

 

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Quiz of the Day: What is Your Spirit Flower?

Your Spirit Flower: Quiz

Our favorite flower may hold secrets about the ways we connect to our spirituality. In this time of blooming, take a walk through our beautiful garden to find out what your favorite flower says about your spirit, then read our suggestions for practices you might like to try.

You can share this with friends and find out what flowers they prefer: all of our spirits together make such a lovely bouquet! Take the quiz here:

Which of the following flowers is your favorite? If yours isn’t on the list, pick the one that comes closest.

Daisy: This sunny, optimistic type loves to connect with her spirit through service, especially in nature. Take nature walks, or participate in clean-ups in parks or other places you treasure. You will probably prefer the unpretentious simplicity of meeting up with friends to anything elaborate.

Gardenia: Exotic, sensual, and mysterious, this type is often attracted to esoteric Asian practices. Try reading a book on Tantric sexuality, or create a sanctuary for your spirit with brocaded hangings, mirrored cushions, lush flowers, and incense.

Iris: The iris is often the favorite flower of many body-workers and other healers. Explore deep meditation, sound healing, or the power of serene images of nature. You may also enjoy expressing your spirit with chanting or yoga.

Calla Lily: This flower embodies grace, dignity, and a Goddess-like presence. You may be drawn to the power and beauty of ritual, and to practices inspired by the ancient Goddesses.

Poppy: This unconventional type may love ecstatic trance dance as an expression of her vibrant spirit. Poppy types are often conduits for spirit when they perform or create, so you might want to explore venues for your creative gifts. Sign up for a workshop!

Rose: Rose-lovers express their spirits through acts of love and friendship for others. They may be drawn to the comfort of traditional services, and the beauty and grace of old hymns or other devotional music.

Violet: The violet type is deeply sensitive and empathic. She will show her devotion in private and uniquely personal practices. A violet person might want to try a daily reading of inspirational quotes, or may find herself attracted to the writings of the mystics. She may want to express her own spiritual insights in poems or other written pieces, as well.

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Self Meditation for Daily Life: Perfection

Self Meditation for Daily Life: Perfection

 As a spiritual being, you are inherently perfect, whole and complete. So why not incorporate this wisdom into a self meditation for daily living. We often  think something is wrong with us. Truth is, nothing is wrong with you. In the Divine Plan everything you are and do is exactly right. Does this seem rather  far-fetched? It isn’t, really. If we were to assume the viewpoint that there is a Divine Plan for your life, and that all you needed to do was to be  yourself in order to fulfill it, then who and what you are is Divinely Right.

Regardless of the condition of your body, you as a soul or spirit are perfect. Spirit is unchanging. If Spirit was right once, then It is always right.  You are made in the image and likeness of that always right Spirit, this is what you as a spiritual being are.

This doesn’t leave much room for shame, guilt or regret. You may have been ignorant or uninformed at the time that these conditions arose, but it  doesn’t negate the fact that you are still perfect. In my opinion, our unknowingness of the Divine Plan and our part in it brings up these negative  emotions. There is something that can be done about it however, and this can bring a great deal of relief to the soul.

Acceptance that we are included in the Divine Plan whether we are consciously aware of it or not can alleviate much of the emotional pain that we carry  around. Staying clear with ourselves that we are part of this, encourages us to stay in alignment with the purity of our inner selves. It is this inner  purity or authenticity which can ensure that we stay on track with the Plan for our lives. Not to emulate some saint somewhere, but to be as realistically  ourselves as we can manage.

From a high level perspective, one may argue that it doesn’t matter what we do, that the Divine Plan unfolds no matter what. This may be true, but can  you live with yourself in the meantime? To bring about peace of mind, I’ve found that it is much easier to promote a sense of being the reality of Self  consciously. This helps us to “tune in” to right action for us, that is, what encourages us to live our lives more fully.

Allow yourself to accept that you really are part of the Plan, always have been and always will be. You are perfect, just the way you are. As you meditate  daily on the concept of perfection in all things, you may find your daily life meditation opens up new levels of acceptance.

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A Spell To See Spirits

A Spell to See Spirits

To see spirits, old European grimoires recommend mixing together aloe, pepper,
musk, vervain and saffron, and burning this in a cemetery.
We can adapt this for other locations (like those in which the spirit lived) by
adding a bit of sweetgrass or tobacco to a specially prepared incense.
Create the incense on the anniversary of the death of the individual you wish to
contact.
This is then burned at 11 am, in the safety of a majick circle that also holds
symbolic items to connect you to the entity.
An incantation to encourage the spirit’s presence is:

“Guardians of the Spirit realm,
hear and guide my plea.
When the witching hour rings true,
bring my relationship, name of person to me.
Other souls who hear my call,
are not welcome in this place.
Only the one known as name of person may enter sacred space.”

Repeat the request three times, twenty minutes apart, then wait quietly for
indications of a presence.
Signs include the scent of flowers, or favored cologne, a cool wind, movement of
curtains, and candles going out or twitching erratically.
Once you feel sure the spirit is with you, do not make it tarry overly long.
Take care of your business, say farewell, and thank the guardians for their
assistance before closing the circle.

A Word of Caution:
Spiritual entities should not be banished or called for amusement.
It is best to contact a knowledgeable, experienced psychic for advice or
assistance before undertaking any spells of this type.
It is used for communication, and understanding the purpose of spirits.
The best times are in-between times, such as noon, midnight, dusk and dawn.
Halloween. Seasons of late fall and winter.
When the Moon is in Libra. Eclipses. Wednesday.

Author unknown

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Let’s Talk Witch – Rites of Passage

Let’s Talk Witch – Rites of Passage

Rites of passage are rituals that mark important moments in the wheel of human life. The birth of a child, coming of age, the death of a loved one, marriage, and eldership are five rites of passage that immediately come to mind. At the birth of a child, Wiccans welcome his spirit into the world. This process often includes an introduction to all the elements and a blessing.

When that child comes of age, he has the right to become a fully recognized adult member of the community and begin participating fully in ritual (if he so wishes). The coming-of-age ceremonies vary from culture to culture but generally include elements of learning, initiation, and social affirmation. At this time, magickal tools are often presented as gifts and he is now expected to be responsible for them.

The marriage (or handfasting) ceremony allows the community to witness and support the adult’s choice of a life partner and links two spirits into a harmonious one (in which neither individual is lost). A magickal marriage often includes jumping over a broomstick or sword at the end of the ritual. This rite marks passage into a new life together and also fosters fertility.

Eldership honors a person’s wisdom and contributions to the community. Croning ceremonies are usually celebrated when the witch has completed her second Saturn Return (at the age of about fifty-eight to sixty). Some things do get better with age, and magick is certainly one of them. The Neo-Pagan community does not view old age as a detriment; it is respected and the insights that old witches offer are gratefully accepted.

At the end of a witch’s life, her spirit is ushered on to its next form of existence. This ritual is typically called a Summerland rite. At this gathering, people open the circle for the spirit of that individual to join them in one last dance and song, and to say their farewells. In this way, the circle provides peace and closure, trusting that everyone will meet again in another life.

Source:
“The Everything Wicca & Witchcraft book’
Author: Skye Alexander
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Upon the Astral Plane and the Afterlife

Upon the Astral Plane and the Afterlife

Author:   Grey Glamer   

In their role as walkers between the worlds, Witches and Heathens are creatures born from apparent paradox. While the individual practitioner may emphasize one or the other, most Neopagans simultaneously honor both the multiplicity and the fundamental unity of All That Is. Meaning no disrespect to the true polytheists among us, I myself find deepest inspiration when I acknowledge one immanent Holy One who wears many masks.

As human beings, though, we’re decidedly prone to losing sight of the forest for the trees, and thus I find beneficial the practice of returning to our most basic beliefs from time to time. My purpose in writing this essay isn’t to resolve all the apparent dualities in our world, or any such herculean task. Rather, I want to focus upon one particular duality that profoundly shapes the quest shared by mystics and magicians, the observed gap between the realms of matter and of spirit, and the ways by which that divide shapes our sense of life, death, and rebirth.

Employing the term in the contemporary, non-Siberian sense, contemporary Witchcraft is a shamanic path. While many Witches and Heathens prefer to conceptualize and discuss magic via the language of energies and vibrations, at some point within our developing quest we encounter some non-physical entity that’s sentient in roughly the same sense that we are sentient. Whether we meet them during our astral journeys or perceive their physical manifestations upon our own material realm, they are undeniably real, possessing strangely familiar feelings and motivations.

Speaking from my own admittedly limited experience, some spiritual beings are beneficent, while some leave morality to be desired. Most are somewhere in the middle, neither angels nor demons. In fact, for all their whimsicality, the average spirit seems very, very human. They have needs and desires, dreams and fears, just like you and me.

This class of being, which impresses itself primarily upon our intuitive sense yet with occasional physical manifestations, I define as spiritual, as opposed to material creatures like ourselves who, generally speaking, prove more intensely cognizant of the physical. Of course, there exists no creature exclusively material or spiritual. Every material creature maintains an aspect within the spiritual realms, and every spiritual being produces some resonance upon the material plane. With precious few exceptions, however, most entities favor one aspect over the other, and only when the Mists between worlds serendipitously grow thin do we even acknowledge the multifaceted nature of our cosmos.

As walkers between the worlds, Witches and Heathens learn how to step lightly from the material into the spiritual and back again. Every Circle that we conjure creates a sanctuary where the material and the spiritual may intertwine. Every spell that we cast draws the two worlds closer together. Viewed from this perspective, magic becomes the awareness of how these two realms – material and spiritual – interact with one another.

Whenever we exercise our awareness of the spiritual, however, we encounter the possibility that we will misinterpret or overvalue the experience. Just looking around, it’s not difficult to conclude that creatures within the material realm are deeply flawed, vulnerable to entropy wearing the twin guises of decay and suffering. Faced with our own decline and eventual demise, we often cast about for something beyond our finite existence, something eternal and incorruptible. We reflect upon the turbulent swirl that is our life, turning towards religion or philosophy for solace.

So when the novice Witch first encounters the spirit world, they often harbor a predisposition to believe that here rests the incorruptible something they’ve been seeking. After all, the spirit realm’s inhabitants don’t appear to be bound by the same fixed life cycles that define our physical existence. Moreover, I suspect our culture’s mythos concerning ghosts and the restless dead fuels a prejudice that says our need for something beyond the grave can be filled by the spirit world.

In my humble opinion, I believe that seeking out eternal life within the spirit world is misguided, although there are certainly worse ways by which one can err. (I’m fully aware the above statement will contradict the beliefs held by many readers, and where that happens, please understand that I don’t consider myself any sort of authority on Truth. I draw upon my experiences and my reflections to generate my unique magical paradigm. Your experiences, your reflections, and your paradigm doubtless will differ from my own, and that’s a Good Thing!)

My intention isn’t to question whether we are eternal, because I believe we are. Nor do I question the existence of the Summer Lands, that blessed abode wherein the ghost recuperates and regroups before returning to the ever-turning wheel. The Summer Lands figure within my own paradigm. Still, I question the nature of the Summer Lands, and especially their connection to realms defined as spiritual or astral.

My interest concerning the Summer Lands took on fresh significance with two recent events. The first episode occurred while I was visiting my astral sanctum around Mothers’ Day. One of the spirits who accompanied me had observed the thoughtforms that people generated as the holiday approached, and asked me whether he himself had a mother. (Spirits, like kids, say the darnedest things.) I was surprised by the question, and since then I’ve delved into path working in hopes of discovering the answer to his question. (It’s material for another essay, yet for those who wonder, I believe the answer is yes.)

The second episode occurred during an otherwise unremarkable walk around my neighborhood a couple months ago. During that walk two spirits that share my home accompanied me. The ground was still drying out from rain the previous night, and we happened upon a dead frog. Not an unusual sight where I live; there are several lakes and rivers here, and when the clouds bring rain the frogs wander up into the streets, where they’re struck by passing motorists.

The “younger” spirit could sense where the frog had been killed, and I could feel her became alarmed that the same fate could befall her. Instinctively, I reached out with what comforting energies I could, communicating the sense of safety, yet after the encounter I found myself wondering: Are spirits in some sense mortal?

To borrow from the Venerable Bede, our own finite lifespan can be compared with the sparrow, which flies from the winter storm into the king’s fire-lit hall, before returning to the storm. That is, we are conscious about our own personal history for one short span, with the vast expanse of the unknown looming large upon either side. The metaphor aptly describes our condition as material beings, yet here I was confronted with two spiritual creatures that professed ignorance regarding the darkness before and after their own existence.

Based on these encounters, I believe spirits also wonder where they originate, and what lies beyond their apparent end. Ergo, spirits don’t possess the solution for the riddle of our own mortality, because they themselves are bound by the same entropic forces.

If the spiritual realms are not immortal, then either the Summer Lands are equally liable to destruction, or else the Summer Lands somehow transcend both the material and the spiritual planes. Because I believe our cosmos, and all things that inhabit this great web of existence, are intrinsically eternal, I must take up the latter argument, that the Summer Lands are neither material nor spiritual in nature, but rather transcend both categories of existence.

To develop an accurate cosmology, which properly honors the Summer Lands, we must first inquire about the planes where finite existence, both material and spiritual, plays itself out. The pantheistic philosopher Benedict Spinoza proposed that all things in existence are but modes that have their being within a unitary, self-caused Substance, simultaneously identified with God and with the cosmos. According to Spinoza’s ontology, this Substance remains unknowable except by its attributes, two of which fall within human detection: extension and thought.

In broad strokes, these two attributes are equivalent to what I term the material and the spiritual, and like Spinoza, I regard these realms as facets of one single, otherwise unknowable (upper-case) Truth.

Eternal life may be found, not among the spiritual realm, but rather within the deeper reality towards which both the material and the spiritual point; therein we learn the true import of our astral journeys. Spirits appear human precisely because they are driven by the same mortality that defines our existence. Certain spirits are heirs to ancient wisdom, but then, some material beings teach crucial truths, as well.

Rather than seeking a spirit world with all the answers, we must prepare ourselves to encounter beings with the same hopes and fears, and we must engage those creatures with the same empathy and compassion, which we would expect.

With the sharing of mutual respect, we acquire insight into the (upper-case) Truth wherein we may discover the Summer Lands and our own incorruptible nature. While spiritual beings don’t enjoy the complete picture, they do view the puzzle from angles that we seldom adopt.

Conversely, as material creatures we grasp certain aspects of reality more readily than most spirits can. Just like the proverbial blind people who grasp different parts of the elephant, we each hold crucial parts belonging to the most sublime puzzle. Only by building bridges of mutual cooperation with our astral cousins can we hope to remember our shared immortality.

May we walk lightly and with compassion.

___________________________________

Footnotes:
Spinoza, Benedict. “The Ethics.” The Rationalists. New York: Anchor Books, 1974.

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