Posts Tagged With: Orion

Dog-gone Doggie of the Day for March 14th

Orion, the Dog of the Day
Name: Orion
Age: Two years old
Gender: Male Breed: Lab, Hound mix
Home: Cary, North Carolina, USA
Orion came to me last March, after the loss of my Aussie Jake (Pet of the Day Jan. 4 1999). He has been in the shelter system for some time and had a near brush with the gas chamber last year. A non-profit Camp Rescue brought him back from near death and cared for him until I meet him earlier this year. He is a rambunctious two-year-old that has two speeds (on full, and sleep).

He shares this house with little sister Sadie a Corgi mix. They get along well enough, occasionally playing when Sadie is in “the mood”. He is such a lover bug, always wants a pat or hug. He loves to stand on his hind legs wrap his paws around your waist, a real hug.

Orion is a funny guy. He is very people oriented and loves attention. He is still learning sit and down. Stay is not possible, he is too active. ” the wild hair” comes at least once a day. He does a greyhound impersonation and tears around the backyard. Sadie tries to herd him, but he is just a little faster.

Orion loves to have his neck scratched. He will sit and stretch his nose way up toward the ceiling. This is the only time he will sit still… it feels so good. So hats off to a very handsome Dude, Orion.

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Astronomy Picture of the Day for Mar. 7 – The Witch Head Nebula

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

IC 2118: The Witch Head Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Gimmi Ratto & Davide Bardini (Collecting Photons) 

Explanation: Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble — maybe Macbeth should have consulted the Witch Head Nebula. This suggestively shaped reflection nebula is associated with the bright star Rigel in the constellation Orion. More formally known as IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula glows primarily by light reflected from bright star Rigel, located just below the lower edge of the above image. Fine dust in the nebula reflects the light. The blue color is caused not only by Rigel’s blue color but because the dust grains reflect blue light more efficiently than red. The same physical process causes Earth’s daytime sky to appear blue, although the scatterers in Earth’s atmosphere are molecules of nitrogen and oxygen. The nebula lies about 1000 light-years away.

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Astronomy Picture of the Day for February 11

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2012 January 17
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

IC 2118: The Witch Head Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Gimmi Ratto & Davide Bardini (Collecting Photons) 

 

Explanation: Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble — maybe Macbeth should have consulted the Witch Head Nebula. This suggestively shaped reflection nebula is associated with the bright star Rigel in the constellation Orion. More formally known as IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula glows primarily by light reflected from bright star Rigel, located just below the lower edge of the above image. Fine dust in the nebula reflects the light. The blue color is caused not only by Rigel’s blue color but because the dust grains reflect blue light more efficiently than red. The same physical process causes Earth’s daytime sky to appear blue, although the scatterers in Earth’s atmosphere are molecules of nitrogen and oxygen. The nebula lies about 1000 light-years away.

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Astronomy Picture of the Day for Jan. 23

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2012 January 23
See Explanation.Moving the cursor over the image will bring up an annotated version.Clicking on the image will bring up the highest resolution versionavailable.

Deep Orion Over the Canary Islands
Image Credit & Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (TWAN) 

Explanation: Which attracts your eye more — the sky or the ground? On the ground are rocky peaks in Teide National Park on Tenerife Island of the Spanish Canary Islands off the northwestern coast of Africa. The volcanic landscape features old island summits and is sometimes used as a testbed for instruments on future Martian rovers. The lights of a nearby hotel shine on the far left. Storm clouds are visible on the horizon, artificially strutted from multiple exposures. Dividing the sky, across the middle of the above deep image, is the vertical band of the Milky Way Galaxy. The red circle on the right is Barnard’s Loop, near the center of which are the famous belt stars of the constellation Orion. Soon after the above image was taken, during an evening earlier this year, storm clouds rolled across, and indoor locations began to attract eyes the most.

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Goddesses for Winter Solstice: Eos and Aurora

Goddess Comments & Graphics
Goddesses for Winter Solstice: Eos and AuroraAuthor Unknown  

For the winter solstice I chose Eos and Aurora to represent the goddess. This is the time of beginning light. As the wheel of year turns, the light begins to return. This is a special time of year for me. I was born in December and my name is Dawn. It is appropriate for me to celebrate with these goddesses.

 

Eos is the Greek goddess of dawn. She was the daughter of two early light deities, Hyperion and Thea. The lovely winged creature drove a chariot hitched to four swift steeds, dragging light across the sky; she changed at midday into another goddess, Hemera (“light of day”), and later into sunset goddess Hesperide. Aurora is the Roman goddess of dawn and has similar stories as of the Greek Eos; her name means“light.”

 

She had a strong sexual appetite, similar to that of Aphrodite, and had many lovers. Sometimes she would kidnap handsome men to serve her needs. There is a story relating to the gigantic Orion. When he was mortal he mistreated his wife Merope. He was blinded by Merope’s father and by the wine god Dionysus. In order to restore his sight, Orion was told to bathe his face in Eos’ rays. He stood on a hilltop looking towards the sky. Not only did she restore Orion’s sight, she kidnapped him to serve as her lover. Orion still had a violent nature and eventually was sent to the stars for an offense against Artemis.

 

Eros had another mortal lover, Tithonus. Eos was so attracted to him she wanted immortality for him. Unfortunately Eos did not ask for eternal youth. Tithonus slowly aged and Eos’love faded. She left him, but took kindness on him. She turned him into a cricket and placed him in a cage near her door. This way he could say good-bye to her as she left on her day’s journey

 

 

Preparation: Dark blue, silver or white altar cloth, one white candle. The ritual will take place at sunset or after dark.

 

Prayer: O dear Goddesses of light, we honor you on this dark day as we wait for the sun to be reborn. We have been traveling in the dark with the hope for the return of the light. We ask you Eos and Aurora to join us tonight as we welcome this day. This is a new beginning for us me as we look ahead to the New Year. Thank you for bringing the warmth of light. Blessed Be.

   
~Magickal Graphics~

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Spell – A- Day – Season of Rest Spell

Spell – A- Day – Season of Rest Spell

 
As the year winds down, we come into a season of rest and regeneration. The leaves are falling; the dark hours are growing longer, and the light is waning. Earth sleeps now beneath our feet. It is at this time that the Hunter comes. Orion, rising in the eastern sky, strides out of the twilight to stand guard over the slumbering world. You may greet him with words like these:
 
See the Hunter in the sky,
Silent watcher drawing nigh.
Long the vigil he must keep
As he guards us in our sleep.
Hunter, hear the thanks we sing,
Till we part again in spring.
 
This charm also works for instilling courage any time of night during the dark part of the year.
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By: Elizabeth Barrette
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NASA Image of the Day for October 11th

Making a Spectacle of Star Formation in Orion

Looking like a pair of eyeglasses only a rock star would wear, this nebula brings into focus a murky region of star formation. NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope exposes the depths of this dusty nebula with its infrared vision, showing stellar infants that are lost behind dark clouds when viewed in visible light.

Best known as Messier 78, the two round greenish nebulae are actually cavities carved out of the surrounding dark dust clouds. The extended dust is mostly dark, even to Spitzer’s view, but the edges show up in mid-wavelength infrared light as glowing, red frames surrounding the bright interiors. Messier 78 is easily seen in small telescopes in the constellation of Orion, just to the northeast of Orion’s belt, but looks strikingly different, with dominant, dark swaths of dust. Spitzer’s infrared eyes penetrate this dust, revealing the glowing interior of the nebulae.

A string of baby stars that have yet to burn their way through their natal shells can be seen as red pinpoints on the outside of the nebula. Eventually these will blossom into their own glowing balls, turning this two-eyed eyeglass into a many-eyed monster of a nebula.

This is a three-color composite that shows infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6- and 4.5-micron light, and green shows light of 5.8 and 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer’s infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer’s multiband imaging photometer.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

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