Posts Tagged With: Norse mythology

Daily Magickal Applications for Wednesday

Fantasy Comments & Graphics

DAILY MAGICKAL APPLICATIONS FOR WEDNESDAY

To the Romans, this day was called Dies Mercurii, or “Mercury’s day” Mercury was a popular character in the Roman pantheon. A messenger of the gods, he presided over commerce, trade, and anything that required skill or dexterity. The Celts also worshiped Mercury and eventually equated him with the Norse god Odin (some spelling variations on this name include Wotan, Wodin, and Wodan). In Norse mythologies, Odin, like Mercury, is associated with poetry and music. Interestingly enough, both Odin and Mercury were regarded as psychopomps, or the leaders of souls, in their individual mythologies.
Odin, one of the main gods in Norse mythology, was constantly seeking wisdom. He traveled the world in disguise as a one-eyed man with a long gray beard, wearing an old, beat-up hat and carrying a staff or a spear (which brings to my mind images of Gandalf from The Lord of the Rings). In the Old English language, this day of Mercury evolved into Wodnes daeg, “Woden’s day,” or Wednesday.
Wednesday carries all of the planetary and magickal energies and associations of the witty and nimble god Mercury himself. Some of these mercurial traits included good communication skills, cleverness, intelligence, creativity, business sense, writing, artistic talent, trickiness, and thievery. And don’t forget all of those wise and enigmatic qualities associated with the Norse god Odin/Wodin, not to mention the goddess Athena’s contributions of music, the arts, handmade crafts, and writing. Wednesdays afford excellent opportunities for seeking wisdom, changing your circumstances, and improving your skills, be they in trade and commerce, music and art, or in communication and writing.

 
Source:
Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

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Deity of the Day for Dec. 8th – Mani, Norse God of the Moon

Deity of the Day

Mani

 

Mani is the Norse god of the moon. He is described as the personification of the physical moon, and he is Sunna’s brother. He is also referred to as the “shining god.” Mani’s lunar magick holds a softer, shadowy likeness to his sister Sunna’s bright solar power, for the moonlight illuminates, yet it also conceals. In Norse mythology, Mani guides the course of the moon and determines its waxing and its waning. Mani is also a chariot-riding deity, and he is followed through the sky by his two children: his son, Hjuki, and his daughter, Bil.

 

 

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week Ellen Dugan

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Wednesday’s Deity of the Day – Odin/Wodin

Wednesday’s Deity of the Day

Odin/Wodin

The name Odin tends to be more Norse in origin, while the name Wodin is Anglo-Saxon and Germanic. This hanged god is a god of wisdom and poetry, and his titles are many, including the All-Father. In some Norse mythologies, he is described as wearing a blue or black hooded cloak as he wanders the earth in the winter months, visiting his people. He has two raven companions, Huginn and Muninn, whose names translate to “thought” and “memory.” These ravens circle the earth daily and then return to Odin to whisper to him the news of humankind. In Norse mythology, Odin willingly hung on the world tree, Yggdrasil, for nine days, seeking power. He gained several songs of power and twenty-four runes. Odin carried a spear that never missed its target. Trading one of his eyes for a drink from the well of wisdom, his sacrifice gained him immense knowledge.

Odin is a god of mystery, magick, shamanism, and rune lore. He also eventually became wrapped up in the mythology of Mercury and was called by many names, including Wodan, Wotan, and Ohdinn. Odin is associated with divine intention and the element of air. The horse, raven, wolf, and eagle are all sacred to him. Odin likes to challenge his followers, but he is always there if you need him. Legend says he may only be approached by those who know of him, but in particular by individuals who call his name.

 

 

 

Source:

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities, The Gods | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

DAILY MAGICKAL APPLICATIONS FOR WEDNESDAY


Celtic Comments & Graphics

DAILY MAGICKAL APPLICATIONS FOR WEDNESDAY

To the Romans, this day was called Dies Mercurii, or “Mercury’s day” Mercury was a popular character in the Roman pantheon. A messenger of the gods, he presided over commerce, trade, and anything that required skill or dexterity. The Celts also worshiped Mercury and eventually equated him with the Norse god Odin (some spelling variations on this name include Wotan, Wodin, and Wodan). In Norse mythologies, Odin, like Mercury, is associated with poetry and music. Interestingly enough, both Odin and Mercury were regarded as psychopomps, or the leaders of souls, in their individual mythologies.

Odin, one of the main gods in Norse mythology, was constantly seeking wisdom. He traveled the world in disguise as a one-eyed man with a long gray beard, wearing an old, beat-up hat and carrying a staff or a spear (which brings to my mind images of Gandalf from The Lord of the Rings). In the Old English language, this day of Mercury evolved into Wodnes daeg, “Woden’s day,” or Wednesday.

Wednesday carries all of the planetary and magickal energies and associations of the witty and nimble god Mercury himself. Some of these mercurial traits included good communication skills, cleverness, intelligence, creativity, business sense, writing, artistic talent, trickiness, and thievery. And don’t forget all of those wise and enigmatic qualities associated with the Norse god Odin/Wodin, not to mention the goddess Athena’s contributions of music, the arts, handmade crafts, and writing. Wednesdays afford excellent opportunities for seeking wisdom, changing your circumstances, and improving your skills, be they in trade and commerce, music and art, or in communication and writing.

Source:

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan
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Calendar of the Sun for Wednesday, February 5th

Calendar of the Sun

5 Solmonath

Day of the Serpent

Colors: Malachite green, sea-blue, and silver
Element: Water
Altar: Set a cloth of sea-blue embroidered with a great serpent in malachite green and silver, and on it place a figure of the Midgard Serpent with its tail in its mouth. Around the room strew colored ribbons in a great circle. The ritual takes place within the circle.
Offerings: Cords or ribbons knotted into a circle.
Daily Meal: Eel. Fish and seafood. Seaweed. Salad. Cooked greens. Eggs.

Invocation to the Midgard Serpent

Hail Iormundgand
Child of the Trickster
And the Hag of the Iron Wood,
Brother and sister of Death,
Neither male nor female
But complete within yourself,
Neither forward nor backward
But eternally circling,
Neither of the earth
Nor apart from it
But forever surrounding us
In our Middle Land.
Teach us, O Serpent,
Of what it is to see the end
And the beginning as one,
To see all things
In their place on the wheel,
To live with the turning
And not mistake it for a straight line
Even when the horizon
Is too far away
For our weak eyes to find.

Chant: Ior Ior Iormundgand

(All join hands and do a circle dance around the outside of the room, just inside the serpent boundary.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

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A Matter of Fate

A Matter of Fate

(Wolf Moon)
The three most notable and powerful giant maidens in Norse mythology are the Norns, which their shape-shifting wolf  companions called the Hounds of Norns. These giant goddesses of fate are named Urd, who represents the past, Verdandi, who symbolizes the present, and Skuld,  who signifies the future. Even Gods cannot undo what the Norns weave into the fabric of fate.
As you drift off to sleep, give yourself the suggestion that you will meet the three Norns in your dreams. Repeat to  yourself:
“I will meet the Norns in my dreams and remember the answer to my question when I wake up.”
  If you have something specific you want to ask them, then feel free to ask it. Otherwise, leave it up to the Norns to tell you what you need to know. When  you meet the Norns in your dreams, don’t be afraid to confront them and ask them what you want to know. When you awake, be sure to make a note of any  answers or information you receive in your journal.
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Your Rune For January 18th is Eihwaz

bw-eihwaz

bw-eihwazYour Rune For Today

Eihwaz       

Eihwaz represents the Yew tree and its everlasting nature. The Yew may bend, but it does not break. You are on the right course and have the strength and ability to meet your goals. Congratulations!

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Your Rune For January 10th is Isa

Your Rune For Today        

Isa        

The Ice Rune,  represents stagnation and a passionless existence. Your life’s course may seem blurry at the moment, but if you persevere you will move onto better days.

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