Posts Tagged With: Mother goddess

Defining Pagan by Edian McCoy

add90990e19f4b41ed9ff4c1fe8ac962

“When one defines oneself as Pagan,
it means she or he follows an earth or nature religion,
one that sees the divine manifest in all creation.
The cycles of nature are our holy days, the earth is our temple,
its plants and creatures our partners and teachers.
We worship a deity that is both male and female,
a mother Goddess and a father God,
who together created all that is, was, or will be.
We respect life, cherish the free will of sentient beings,
and accept the sacredness of all creation.” —

Edain McCoy

Bless be sisters and brothers of The Old Ways

Categories: Coven Life, Daily Posts, Our History, Rejuvenation | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Deities of the Spring Equinox

Deities of the Spring Equinox

 

Spring is a time of great celebration in many cultures. It’s the time of year when the planting begins, people begin to once more enjoy the fresh air, and we can reconnect with the earth again after the long, cold winter. A number of different gods and goddesses from different pantheons are connected with the themes of Spring and Ostara. Lets take a look at some of the many deities associated with spring, rebirth, and new life each year.

 

Asase Yaa (Ashanti)

This earth goddess prepares to bring forth new life in the spring, and the Ashanti people of Ghana honor her at the festival of Durbar, alongside her husband Nyame, the sky god who brings rain to the fields. As a fertility goddess, she is often associated with the planting of early crops during the rainy season. In some parts of Africa, she is honored during an annual (or often bi-annual) festival called the Awuru Odo. This is a large gathering of extended family and kinship groups, and a great deal of food and feasting seems to be involved.

In some Ghanaian folktales, Asase Yaa appears as the mother of Anansi, the trickster god, whose legends followed many West Africans to the New World during the centuries of the slave trade.

Interestingly, there do not appear to be any formalized temples to Asase Yaa – instead, she is honored in the fields where the crops grown, and in the homes where she is celebrated as a goddess of fertility and the womb. Farmers may opt to ask her permission before they begin working the soil. Even though she is associated with the hard labor of tilling the fields and planting seeds, her followers take a day off on Thursday, which is her sacred day.

 

Cybele (Roman)

This mother goddess of Rome was at the center of a rather bloody Phrygian cult, in which eunuch priests performed mysterious rites in her honor. Her lover was Attis (he was also her grandson, but that’s another story), and her jealousy caused him to castrate and kill himself. His blood was the source of the first violets, and divine intervention allowed Attis to be resurrected by Cybele, with some help from Zeus. In some areas, there is still an annual three-day celebration of Attis’ rebirth and Cybele’s power.

Like Attis, it is said that Cybele’s followers would work themselves into orgiastic frenzies and then ritually castrate themselves. After this, these priests donned women’s clothing, and assumed female identities. They became known as the Gallai. In some regions, female priestesses led Cybele’s dedicants in rituals involving ecstatic music, drumming and dancing. Under the leadership of Augustus Caesar, Cybele became extremely popular. Augustus erected a giant temple in her honor on the Palatine Hill, and the statue of Cybele that is in the temple bears the face of Augustus’ wife, Livia.

Today, many people still honor Cybele, although not in quite the same context as she once was. Groups like the Maetreum of Cybele honor her as a mother goddess and protector of women.

 

Eostre (Western Germanic)

Little is known about the worship of this Teutonic spring goddess, but she is mentioned by the Venerable Bede, who said that Eostre’s following had died out by the time he compiled his writings in the eighth century. Jacob Grimm referred to her by the High German equivalent, Ostara, in his 1835 manuscript, Deutsche Mythologie.

According to the stories, she is a goddess associated with flowers and springtime, and her name gives us the word “Easter,” as well as the name of Ostara itself. However, if you start to dig around for information on Eostre, you’ll find that much of it is the same. In fact, nearly all of it is Wiccan and Pagan authors who describe Eostre in a similar fashion. Very little is available on an academic level.

Interestingly, Eostre doesn’t appear anywhere in Germanic mythology, and despite assertions that she might be a Norse deity, she doesn’t show up in the poetic or prose Eddas either. However, she could certainly have belonged to some tribal group in the Germanic areas, and her stories may have just been passed along through oral tradition.

So, did Eostre exist or not? No one knows. Some scholars dispute it, others point to etymological evidence to say that she did in fact have a festival honoring her.

 

Freya (Norse)

This fertility goddess abandons the earth during the cold months, but returns in the spring to restore nature’s beauty. She wears a magnificent necklace called Brisingamen, which represents the fire of the sun. Freyja was similar to Frigg, the chief goddess of the Aesir, which was the Norse race of sky deities. Both were connected with childrearing, and could take on the aspect of a bird. Freyja owned a magical cloak of hawk’s feathers, which allowed her to transform at will. This cloak is given to Frigg in some of the Eddas.

As the wife of Odin, the All Father, Freyja was often called upon for assistance in marriage or childbirth, as well as to aid women struggling with infertility.

 

Osiris (Egyptian)

Osiris is known as the king of Egyptian gods. This lover of Isis dies and is reborn in a resurrection story. The resurrection theme is popular among spring deities, and is also found in the stories of Adonis, Mithras and Attis as well.

Born the son of Geb (the earth) and Nut (the sky), Osiris was the twin brother of Isis and became the first pharoah. He taught mankind the secrets of farming and agriculture, and according to Egyptian myth and legend, brought civilization itself to the world. Ultimately, the reign of Osiris was brought about by his death at the hands of his brother Set (or Seth).

The death of Osiris is a major event in Egyptian legend.

 

Saraswati (Hindu)

This Hindu goddess of the arts, wisdom and learning has her own festival each spring in India, called Saraswati Puja. She is honored with prayers and music, and is usually depicted holding lotus blossoms and the sacred Vedas.

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Deity of the Day for March 16th – Cybele (Roman Goddess)

Deity of the Day

Cybele

(Roman Goddess Associated With Ostara)

 

This mother goddess of Rome was at the center of a rather bloody Phrygian cult, in which eunuch priests performed mysterious rites in her honor. Her lover was Attis (he was also her grandson, but that’s another story), and her jealousy caused him to castrate and kill himself. His blood was the source of the first violets, and divine intervention allowed Attis to be resurrected by Cybele, with some help from Zeus. In some areas, there is still an annual three-day celebration of Attis’ rebirth and Cybele’s power.

Today, many people still honor Cybele, although not in quite the same context as she once was. Groups like the Maetreum of Cybele honor her as a mother goddess and protector of women.

 

Source:
Author: Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert

Article Found On & Owned By About.com

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities, The Goddesses | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Festival of Yemanja (lemanja of Brazil)

Celtic & British Isles Graphics
February 9 and 10

Festival of Yemanja (lemanja of Brazil)

 

In Afro-Brazilian spiritual traditions, Yemanja is the Goddess of all sea waters and a symbol of mastery. Her name means “the mother whose children are the fish.” She is considered to be a Mother Goddess and has dominion over all large bodies of water, including the depths of the ocean.

Yemanja is the patron of motherhood and is often associated with the moon. Her colors are blue and white. Her symbols include the fan, mermaid, a silver crescent, and all things that come from the sea.

On this day in Brazil, great festivals honor Yemanja. They begin at daybreak with ocean-bound processions of singers and dancers, all expressing their love for the Goddess. Those participating carry candles and offerings carved with fish to the seashore. Thousands of candles in tiny paper boats are set afloat on the ocean as participants make wishes for the coming year


Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Deity of the Day for July 4th – Rhea, The Greek Goddess

Deity of the Day

Rhea

The Greek Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Rhea was an Earth Goddess, responsible for the fertility of the soil, women and motherhood. She took over most of these responsibilities from her mother Gaia/Gaea.

Her name means “flow” and “ease” relating to her role of the Great Mother where the flow refers to menstrual blood. It also links her to the tides and the moon.

She is closely identified with the Anatolian Great Mother Goddess, Cybele. They shared similar roles and symbolism.

Together with Cronus she ruled over the Titans. Her position as Queen was succeeded by Hera when the Titans were defeated by the Olympians.

This ancient deity had priest’s were called Curetes.

Origins and Genealogy: Her parents were Gaia and Uranus.

This Goddess had many brothers and sisters including the Titans: Cronus, Hyperion, Lapetus, Theia, Themis Mnemosyne, Pheobe and Tethys.

She married her brother Cronus and had six children by him: Demeter, Hera, Hestia, Hades Poseidon and Zeus.

Rhea was horrified when Cronus swallowed each of them whole at birth as he feared the fulfillment of a prophecy that predicted he would be overthrown by one of his children.

When Zeus was born she tricked her husband into swallowing a stone wrapped up in his swaddling clothes. Zeus was then hidden and taken to Crete.

Later, when Cronus was dethroned and imprisoned she had an affair with Olympus and gave birth to two more children, Alce and Midas.

Crete became the main centre of this Mother Goddesses cult.

Strengths: A Mother figure, generally gentle but becomes fearsome when crossed.

Weaknesses: She deserts her husbands but who can blame her?

Rhea’s Symbolism

Rhea is usually shown as a matronly woman with a turret crown, standing between two lions or on a chariot pulled by lions.

The moon is another one of her symbols representing her role as a fertility Goddess.

Other symbols include a lighted torch, brass drums and a double ax.

Sacred Animal: Lions,

Sacred Plants: Fruit bearing trees, pine and the oak.

Sacred Day: Saturday was devoted to this Goddess.

Her close ties with Cybele, link this Goddess to Spring Festivals held to honour the Great Mother. This celebration is the origin of Mothering Sunday.

Rhea’s Archetype

The Mother:

The Mother Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before her self is the essense of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

Rhea is a Mother Goddess caring for the earth. When it comes to the care of her own children her credentials as a loving mother are less convincing. She is unable to stand up to cruel husband and only saves them through trickery and by sending Zeus to be cared for in Crete.

How to Work with this Archetype

The Mother:

You do not need to be a biological mother to have this Archetype. The Mother Archetype refers to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to any living thing including plants and animals.

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow mother if you smother your children and are over protective. You need to encourage independence, allowing children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
The Goddess-Guide.com

 

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blessings of Litha To All My Dear Family & Friends!


Litha Comments & Graphics

Blessings of Litha

 

This wheel keeps turning
Turning on and on
As each new Season dawns…
 
It keeps turning
As we pray for the coming of Litha
That’s when we ask you…
Oh Litha carry us into
Sister Moon grace us into
Brother Sun face us towards
Mother Goddess place us
Place us in the blessings of Litha
 
The blessings of Litha that are
Malina’s warm sun
Flora’s sweet flowers
Psyche’s beautiful butterflies
Gaia’s lush green
Yemaya’s liquid bliss
Iris’ colorful rainbow
 
As we dance for the coming of Litha
That’s when we ask you…
Oh Litha embrace us
Sister Moon grace us
Brother Sun face us
Mother Goddess place us
Place us in the blessings of Litha
 
The blessings of Litha that are
Malina’s warm sun on our faces
Flora’s sweet flowers under her graces
Psyche’s beautiful butterflies dancing on the wind
Gaia’s lush green that covers the earth from end to end
Yemaya ‘s liquid bliss that surrounds us with love
Iris’ colorful rainbow that imbues us from above
 
As we sing for the coming of Litha
That’s when we ask you…
Oh Litha carry us into
Mother Earth’s sweet face look over us
Oshun’s liquid grace bliss us
Gaia’s beautiful hidden spaces protect us
Mother Goddess’ wishes place us
Place us in these blessings of Litha
 
These blessings of Litha that are
Given to us with love
From our Mother Goddess above
 
Given to us while this wheel turns
Turns on and on
As each new Sabbat dawns
 
 
By Savannah Skye
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Deity of the Day for June 16th is Arianrhod

Deity of the Day

Arianrhod

 

Areas of Influence: Arianrhod was the Celtic Goddess of fertility, rebirth and the weaving of cosmic time and fate.

Her name has been translated as silver-wheel, a symbol that represents the ever-turning wheel of the year.

The wheel may also refers to the oar wheel upon which she carried the dead back to her heavenly northern land the Corona Borealis. Here according to some Welsh traditions the dead souls waited for the Goddess and her female attendants to decide their fate before being reincarnated.

Alternative spellings of her name include Arianrhod and Arianrhod.

In Celtic mythology her uncle Math, had to keep his feet in the lap of a virgin when he was not at war. When the virgin is raped whilst the king is away on a military campaign, the Arianrhod brother suggests she would make a good replacement.

Maths demands to test her purity by making her step over his magician’s rod. As she does this she gives birth to Dylan a sea spirit who flees to the ocean and a formless blob who only her brother Gwydion notices. The moon Goddess runs away ashamed of the public humiliation. Gwydion scopes up the blob and puts him into a magical chest.

Four years later he takes the child back to the Goddess. She refuses to acknowledge the boy and curses him saying he will never be allowed a name, to bare arms or to marry any woman of this Earth.

Using trickery and magic Gwydion breaks the curses even forming Lleu Llaw a wife out of flowers.

Origins and Genealogy: Her mother was Don the great Celtic Mother Goddess and her father is said to be Beli Mawr.

She had several siblings including three sisters, Gwenna, Maelen and Elen and two brothers, Gwydion and Gifaethwy.

She bore two children Dylon and Lleu Llaw Gyffes.

Strengths: A free spirited Goddess who is not prepared to bend to any one’s expectations of her.

Weaknesses: She is vindictive and unable to let go of the past.

 

Arianrhod’s  Symbolism

She is usually depicted as a pale skinned, fair haired Goddess .

Her symbols include the Silver wheel, weaving implements the full moon and the Corona Borealis.

Sacred Bird: The Goddess shape-shifted into a large wise owl which enabled her to see into the dark depths of the human soul.

Sacred Plant: Ivy.

Spiders are also associated with this Goddess as she is seen as a weaver of fate.

 

Arianrhod’s Archetype

The Mother: This Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

This Celtic moon Goddess is a Mother Goddess as she is a fertility Goddess. However in her role as a mother she represents the shadow aspect not even wishing to acknowledge her children’s rights and existence.

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

BELIEFS OF GODDESS WORSHIP

BELIEFS OF GODDESS WORSHIP

Christianity teaches that God is transcendent, is separate from nature, and is represented to humankind through masculine imagery. Witchcraft holds a
pantheistic view of God. God is nature, therefore God is in all things and all things are a part of God. However, this God is in actuality a goddess.

A fundamental belief in Goddess Worship is the idea that the goddess predates
the male God. The goddess is the giver of all life and is found in all of
creation. The importance of the Goddess symbol for women cannot be overstressed. The image of the Goddess inspires women to see ourselves as divine, our bodies as sacred, the changing phases of our lives as holy, our aggression as healthy,and our anger as purifying. Through the Goddess, we can discover our strength,enlighten our minds, own our bodies, and celebrate our emotions.

The modern Goddess movement is an attempt to integrate the feminine back into
the world as we know it. This means bringing the Goddess out of the shadows and back into the limelight where she belongs. Part of most modern Goddess
traditions is the idea that Goddess exists within and around everything in
creation. Therefore, if Goddess is sacred, then so is the Earth, so our bodies, etc. Moreover, the relationship between all of these things is equally sacred. Therefore, not only do we need to revere the creations of the Goddess, we must revere the relationship and the systems that Goddess has created, for they each have their purpose. The problem is that we don’t always know what the true system is anymore because our society is so corrupted by the patriarchy. For example, if we only examine the system as it exists today, we might come to the conclusion that women’s place within the system is necessarily subservient to the men in the system. Naturally, eco-feminists would laugh at this idea. First of all, eco-feminism maintains that the natural order of things is not linked by hierarchical value, so the very notion of men governing women is absurd. The nature of things would require reciprocal communication and integral networking.

In light of this, then, Goddess religion asserts that Goddess and God cannot be viewed separately, but rather as a network of energies that work together to better the entire network.

Goddess Archetypes:

THE MAIDEN
The Maiden is the first aspect of the Goddess, presented to us as a young woman,blossoming into womanhood, exploring her sexuality and learning of her beauty.She is most often depicted as a teenaged girl or a woman in her very early twenties.

Unlike the images of young women in many patrifocal religions, the Maiden is not necessarily depicted as a virgin in most Goddess traditions. In Catholicism,Mary is depicted not only as a virgin maiden, but continues to be a virgin throughout the duration of her lifetime, regardless of the fact that she was married and gave birth to a child. This has more to do with the taint patrifocal religions assign female sexuality than anything else. But because women’s sexuality is not denigrated in Goddess traditions, there is no need to associate virginity with the Maiden Goddess.

In fact, the Maiden Goddess is seen as a particularly sexual being. Because she has just bloomed into her womanly form, she is particularly interested in her body and what it can do. She is interested in her beauty, and she learns to manipulate the affections of other’s based upon her feminine wiles.

Some might take offense at my use of the word manipulate in the preceding
sentence, but in fact, that is what sexuality is about, both on the part of the male and the female. Flirtation, courting and other manners of getting the
attentions of the opposite sex is certainly a form of manipulation. It is not
manipulation with malicious intent, to be sure, but when you attempt to curb the attitudes or thoughts of others through your own appearance or behavior, this is a form of manipulation, and by no means negative.

Because the Maiden is associated with the first blossoming of womanhood,
adulthood and sexuality, she is associated with the Springtime. Just as her body develops breasts and she becomes sexually capable, so too does the Earth mimic her development. Flowers bloom, the Earth awakens from the deep sleep of winter and begins to procreate again. Animals lie with one another, flowers are pollinated. Spring is a time for new beginnings. It is the counterpart to the winter of Death.

Just as Spring is the counter to Winter, so too is the Maiden the counter to the Crone. The Crone is the embodiment of death, and subsequently rebirth, and it is through the aspect of the Maiden that the Crone is able to pass from this world and be reborn. As the young Goddess delves into her sexuality, and eventually becomes pregnant, the Elder Goddess may pass away and give her life that the Maiden may become Mother, and one day, Crone. The cycle is never ending.

The Maiden takes the Green Man (Horned Lord, many other names in many other
cultures) as her consort. In some cultures, the Green Man may be her brother or even her son. At first glance, the courtship between the Maiden and the Sun God seems ripe with incest, because he is always somehow related to her. But if you read the myths associated with the Mother Goddess and how it came to pass that she became pregnant, you will usually find that she became pregnant by her husband, who has to give his life for one reason or another, and she agrees to bring him back into he world as the child in her womb. In essence, she gives birth to her husband, rather than taking her son as her lover. This is even true in the Catholic goddess vision: Jesus was the son of God, but he was also God. Because this idea is confusing and can lead to ideas of incest much like I discussed above, the Christian church left Mary a virgin, thus bypassing the whole sexual encounter, and thus the issue of incest altogether.

Maiden Goddess of Note include:
Diana, Persephone, Kore, Bleudowedd, Artemis, Ariadne, Hestia,
Athena, Aphrodite, Minerva, and Venus.

THE MOTHER
The aspect of the Mother Goddess is probably the most widely known and most
widely envisioned in most cultures. Because the Earth nourishes and replenishes us, most goddess cultures did pay reverence to the Earth as the Mother, and therefore the Goddesses that are most prominent and about whom stories are most prolific are the goddesses that are the representation of the Mother.

She is, in virtually every aspect, a divine or celestial representation of our earthly mothers. Everyone has an earthly mother, or at least did at one point, so we readily understand the relationship between mother and child. The mother is the protector, the care-giver, the kisser of wounds, and the disciplinarian.

The Divine Mother is no different.

Many of the most ancient goddess figures that archeology has uncovered are
goddesses depicted as round, pregnant women. They feature large breasts and
full, meaty hips. Some archeologists (patriarchal, close minded fellows, to be sure) have written these goddess figures off as nothing more than prehistoric “porn” figures. However, the generally accepted opinion is that these figures, found in such places as France, modern day Turkey, and Egypt, are actually representations of a mother goddess. There is some speculation that perhaps these figures are not goddesses at all, but rather figures used in fertility rites to enable women to conceive children. This too is a possibility, but when combined with other information that we have (such as other evidence of prehistoric goddess worship, and the fact that the connection between sex and pregnancy was not made until much later than the dates associated with these figures) leads most scholars to believe that these statues are indeed goddess representations.

Although the depiction of the Mother Goddess as a pregnant woman is prominent, she is certainly not always seen that way. The Mother aspect may be seen with small child in tow (most often a boy, who later becomes her consort, as is discussed in the section on the Maiden). This aspect of the Mother Goddess plays on the care-giving, sweet, loving aspect of the Goddess. However, do not be fooled into thinking that the Goddess as Mother is a pussy cat. She can also be a warrior.

Like earthly mothers, the Goddess is fiercely protective of her children, and in order to provide that protection she will often don the face of the warrior. The Warrior Goddess most probably gained popularity among people who had begun to adopt a more patriarchal (or at least patrifocal) structure. It might be presumptuous to say that matrifocal cultures were not particularly warlike, but it is safe to say that patriarchal cultures were more so. In either case, the warrior Goddess did become popular. In this aspect she is Amazon, fierce and strong, and able to take on any man to protect what needs protection.

Just as the maiden is represented by the season of Spring, the Mother aspect is present in Summer. By summer, berries and fruits are ripe, ready for the
plucking. Vegetable gardens are mature and harvest is close at hand. The sun is high in the sky, and even though the sun is typically seen as a Male Deity, some cultures did associate the sun with the Goddess, (most notably the early Egyptian culture) and thus the high sun of summer was associated with the Mother, who was also seen as the pinnacle of the cycle of life.

In western traditions, the Goddess remains pregnant until the Winter Solstice, at which time she gives birth to a sun god of some kind. (Note the adaptation of the Christian church …Christmas, anyone?) The Catholic Goddess Mary also falls into the category of the Mother Goddess, because she does give birth to King at Solstice. (At least this is how the Christians celebrate the holiday, even though biblical scholars suggest Jesus was very likely born during a warm month)

Mary is a curiosity though, because she is a Dual Goddess, and not a Triple
Goddess as most multifaceted Goddesses are. She is a maiden because she remains a virgin (and though not all maidens are virgins, all virgin goddesses are maidens), and yet because she gives birth, she is also a Mother. However, there is no reference in the Catholic tradition of Mary as an older woman. Therefore, Mary’s development ended with her at the Mother phase.

Mother Goddesses of Note include:
Demeter, Isis, Cerridwyn, Kali, Gaia, Oceana, Brigit, Nuit, Hera,
Selene, Anu, Dana, Arianrhod, and Epona

THE CRONE
The Crone is the final aspect of the Goddess. The Crone is most often depicted as a Grandmother, a SageWoman, or a Midwife. She is the keeper of Occult Knowledge, the Mysteries and the Queen of the Underworld. It is through the Crone that knowledge of magick, the Dark, and other secrets of the ages are passed down.

The Crone is, in some ways, a Triple Goddess herself. She has lived through the tender, sensual age of Maidenhood, suffered the birth pains of Motherhood, and now carries with her the memories of these passages into her old age. But though she has experienced these events, these are not the things she represents, and therefore she is not revered for these traits. Nevertheless, having endured these experiences makes her the wise woman that she is, and enables her to guide us through the dark.

Her role as Midwife is both symbolic as well as actual. Traditionally, it is
always the older women of the tribe who facilitate the birth of children, most likely because they themselves had gone through, but also because the role of midwife was a sacred position, and thus suitable for an older tribeswoman. Certainly the Crone fulfills this aspect in that she is the midwife to the Queen of Heaven when she gives birth to the Oak King at Yule.

But symbolically she is the midwife in our lives as well, guiding us from one
phase of life to the next. If you see progression from one phase of life to the next and can see it as a rebirth process, then envision the Crone as the aspect of the goddess that guides you through that time. Transition is very difficult, and for most people it is a time of darkness. It is a time where we have to rely on our intuition, because we are unfamiliar with the territory. But according to the myths and ancient lore, we receive our intuition from the Crone. It is she who guides us, and it is she who facilitates our birth.

The Crone Goddess is often times the least seen, because she does represent
death, and with death comes fear: fear of the unknown, fear of losing our loved ones, and fear of being alone. But we must remember that with death always comes rebirth. The Crone always brings with her promises of the Maiden, and the cycle never ends.

The Mother aspect of the Goddess is discussed as being a Warrior Goddess, but
the Crone can be a Warrior Goddess as well. Where the Mother Goddess is the
blood of battle, the War Cry incarnate, the fighting Amazon, the Crone is the
Strategy, the ability to see what cannot be seen. She is the seer, the General. The Crone Goddess does not don the face of the warrior to shed blood, but she will provide the courage to walk through the dark, the ability to seek and destroy the enemy, whether the enemy is actual, or internal.

In many respects, the Crone Goddess is the aspect of the Goddess that is most
called upon to conquer inner demons. This is due to the fact that as the keeper of mysteries, the Crone is also the Keeper of the Underworld. With her help, we are able to travel into the Underworld and fight whatever demons haunt us. Likewise, once we are ready to be reborn, she again acts as the midwife and guides us once again into the light.

Crone Goddesses of Note include:
Hecate, Kali, Cerridwyn, Badb, Cailleach, Macha, and the Morrigan

written by susan lucas

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Goddesses | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,714 other followers