Posts Tagged With: Magnesium sulfate

Herbal Bath Salts

Herbal Bath Salts

 

Epson Salts

A handful of your favorite herbs that you like. Use as many different kind as you can.

Mix together and pour into a cork topped glass bottle. This will keep for as long as needed. Just be sure to shake them occasionally as Epsom salts will tend to stick together and ball up into a hard mass if not shaken every once in a while.

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7 Home Remedies For Your Dog

7 Home Remedies For Your Dog

When you’re feeling under the weather, you might find that the  perfect thing  for treating what ails you is something you already have  in the kitchen. Did you know  that you can treat your ailing dog with  some simple home remedies too? Below  you will find seven great natural  remedies for making your dog happy and  healthy again.

TIP #1

Vitamin E is good for preventing those pesky age lines on your face,  and  it’s also great for your dog’s dry skin. You can give your pup a  doggy massage  by applying vitamin E oil directly to the skin, a soaking  bath with vitamin E  added to the water, or you can go all “Hollywood”  and pop your dog a pill (of  vitamin E, that is).

If you give the vitamin orally, check with your vet on the recommended dosage  for your specific dog breed.

TIP #2

Flavorless electrolyte-replacing liquids, such as sports waters or  pediatric  drinks, not only help athletes to replenish fluids, and babies  to rehydrate  after an illness, they can also supply your sick pooch’s  body with much needed  fluids after a bout of diarrhea or vomiting.

Consult your veterinarian as to the appropriate dosage amounts when giving  these types of liquids to your dog.

TIP #3

Deliciously plain yogurt is a healthy treat for your dog. Just as  with  humans, the live acidophilus in the yogurt keeps the good bacteria  in your  dog’s intestines in balance, so that bad bacteria is swiftly  knocked out. If  your dog is on antibiotics, a little yogurt will also  help keep yeast  infections at bay (a common side-effect of antibiotic  treatment). You can also  give your dog acidophilus pills — wrapping the  pills in bacon is strictly  optional.

Puppies are especially prone to yeast infections, so a little plain  yogurt  as a snack (or even dessert) can help keep things in balance;  especially useful  while the intestinal system is building immunities.

TIP #4

Chamomile tea uses the natural disinfecting effects of the chamomile  plant  to settle upset doggy tummies. It is recommended for colic, gas,  and anxiety.  It can also alleviate minor skin irritations. Just chill in  the fridge and  spray onto the affected area on the dog’s raw skin. Your  dog should feel an  immediate soothing effect as the chilled tea kills  the yeast and/or bacteria on  the skin. A warm (not hot) tea bag can also  be used for soothing infected or  irritated eyes.

TIP #5

An itchy dog can be quite an annoyance, especially as it goes around   scratching itself on any piece of furniture it can reach. Forget the   backscratcher. Finely ground oatmeal is a time-honored remedy for  irritated  skin. You can use baby oatmeal cereal or grind it yourself in a  food processor.  Stir the oatmeal into a bath of warm water and let your  dog soak in the healing  goodness. Your dog will thank you, trust us.  Dogs with skin allergies,  infections, and other diseases which cause  itchiness have been shown to gain  immediate relief with this approach,  too.

TIP #6

Dogs can be like kids at times, and as such they are bound to suffer  from  wounds and the occasional unexplained swelling. Try treating these  ailments  with Epsom salt soaks and heat packs next time. A bath  consisting of Epsom salt  and warm water can help reduce the swelling and  the healing time, especially  when combined with prescribed antibiotics  and veterinary supervision.

If soaking your dog in an Epsom salt bath twice a day for five  minutes isn’t  convenient or practical, a homemade heat pack using a  clean towel drenched in  the same warm-water solution can be applied to  wounds for the same effect.

TIP #7

Does your dog have fleas? Never fear. Before turning to the big guns,  try  some borax powder. The standard stuff at the store will work  wonders on fleas by poking holes in their crunchy insect  exoskeletons. A good way to  make sure those parasitic suckers get  annihilated is to sprinkle the  borax on your floor, and then sweep or vacuum up  the excess. The  invisible borax crystals left behind will kill the fleas and  you won’t  even have to lift a finger. It’s inexpensive and practically  non-toxic  compared to an appointment with the exterminator.

For the dog, try a simple solution of lemon water. Fleas are repelled  by  citrus, so this can work both as a flea preventive, and for making  your dog  smell clean and refreshing. A useful solution can be made by  pouring boiled  water over lemons and allowing them to steep over night.  This solution can then  be applied all over your dog’s skin using a fresh  spray bottle. And, the tried  and true Brewer’s yeast method cannot be  left out. Brewer’s yeast can be given  as part of a regular diet in  powdered form, sprinkled over the dog food, or in  tablet form, perhaps  wrapped in a small slice of bacon or cheese.

Home (or holistic) remedies aren’t just for tree huggers anymore.  It’s  important to take care of your dog from  day to day, not just when  it’s  feeling a little under the weather, and the best way to maintain  the best  health is often the most natural way. But most of all, it’ll  help keeping your  “baby” from crying like a hound dog.

 

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Daily Feng Shui Tip for June 1 – “World Milk Day”

Some calendars refer to this first day of the month as ‘World Milk Day,’ so I thought I’d share some milky legends and a silky soak. Milk was once considered a mystical gift from the gods. It was also believed to strengthen and enhance your own ability to give and receive love. And that promise pertains whether you’re wearing a milk mustache or bathing in it. This particular milk bath recipe offers soothing and calm while bringing restoration to body, mind and spirit. You’ll need a half-cup each of honey, milk and Epsom salts, as well as a few springs of fresh parsley and mint. Mix the milk and honey in a bowl and add the herbs. Run a bath and pour in the salt and let dissolve. Add the honey and milk mixture and soak in that for twenty quiet minutes. Ah, milk. It does a body good.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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Healing & Uplifting Body Soak

Healing & Uplifting Body Soak

2 cups dead sea salt (can improvise with sea salt)
2 cups of fine sea salt (crushed not the large granules)
2 cups epsom salt
1/8 cup pulverized orange rinds
1/4 cup crumbled peppermint (the leaves not the candy)
2 tbsp of these: Myrrh, sweet orange, and sandlewood essential oils (easy to get and pretty cheap)

Begin on a Friday during the waning moon. Mix salts in large nonreactive bowl. Recite:
“Precious gift from the Mothers of river and sea,”
Grind orange rinds and say:
“Uplift my spirits with your blessed fruit.”
Add to salts and mix well. Stir in crushed peppermint saying:
“In honor of Mother Earth, please hear my plea.”
In seperate bowl blend essential oils, then pour over salt mixture. Put into a screw top container, mixing well. Shake all ingrediants for three days, mixing them well. Do you have a crystal ball or something like one? Try to find something to concentrate on, a mirror, or maybe a shiny object. Focus intently on conjuring up healing power as you mix the soak.
Use two cups per bath. Use cool water. If possible place a gardinia petal or plant on silver or white silk cloth by window or table. Take bath in the evening of the Friday of a waning moon. Burn soothing incense in a sea shell over a hot charcoal.
Now, open your spirit and release your grief, sorrow, despair, whatever you are feeling into the water and into the smoke. As you watch the tub drain when finished, visualize your anguish, pain, sorrow leaving along with the water.

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Water Magick – The Importance of Sea Salt

The Importance of Sea Salt

 

In maritime lore, seawater was thought to cleanse a person thoroughly, absorbing any bad luck, due to the salt content of the water. Throwing salt into a fire for nine consecutive days was thought to break any chain of bad luck, while throwing salt at a person was sure to bring her grief.

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Fire and You

Fire and You

by Andy

Standout Box

This is fire. Fire is dangerous. Keep that in mind when fire scrying. Light your fire in an open area, leave space around it. Indoors is okay, but leave a window open nearby for ventilation. Also be aware that your fire alarm will probably go off if you are indoors and don’t turn it off.

Take a large bowl, or cauldron, that won’t burn. I use one of those big silvery metal salad bowls. It has taken on a nice burnished, rainbowy look from all the fires. Put the bowl on the floor or on a low altar. Leave at least two feet of room all around it. Put a towel under it if you don’t want what is beneath it to be scorched. You can surround it with large rocks to keep it from being knocked over if you are going to have people moving or dancing around it or if your bowl has a round bottom. Make sure that any animals and small children are safely occupied elsewhere.

Pour in a cup of rubbing alcohol. Light it on fire with a long match or already lit long candle. The fire won’t roar up instantly, but it will do it quickly enough that you will be grateful for the length of the match. Lighters (the short ones) are a good way to get burnt. I use one of those long barbecue lighters both for safety and reliability in the often windy conditions of outdoor rituals.

One cup of rubbing alcohol will probably get you 10 minutes of flame. Plenty of time for a good vision. Let the flame burn out naturally. Do not refill the bowl while the flame is burning. I lit myself on fire once this way. I was careless and did not respect the flame. It reminded me of respect, completely destroying a Lughnasad ritual in the process.

The flame will probably be between two and two and a half feet high. The higher the alcohol content in the rubbing alcohol the hotter the flame will be. Ninety-nine percent fires will also leave more ash and be more likely to set off the smoke detector. Start with the seventy percent until you get comfortable with it. The first time, it will look much bigger than you expect. Practice before using it in ritual. Start with one half cup and work up.

In case of emergencies, probably a spill, don’t panic. Look at the fire to see if it will actually light anything else on fire. Unlike wax/oil fires, you can put rubbing alcohol fires out with water so keep a lot handy. The alcohol will float at first, but then go out. Smothering with a damp towel also works. Just drop the towel over fire. Ninety-nine percent alcohol will produce more interesting fires, but seventy percent will hurt less if you are burned. A bottle of burn cream or a fire extinguisher, even though you will probably never use them, will greatly reassure the pyrophobes around you.

When I first started doing scrying bowls, everyone told me I had to put Epsom salt in the alcohol, but no one knew why. Epsom salt makes the flames more even and less wild. When using ninety-nine percent, this can produce the occasional ring effect (a ring effect is like a smoke ring of fire), but overall, the effect of Epsom salt is minimal. Using sea or table salt produces random flashes of gold color late in the burn. Using boric acid, instead of a salt, will give a much more pronounced effect turning much of the fire bright green. Epsom salt and rubbing alcohol are both in the pharmacy part of a large grocery/drug store. Boric acid will be by the contact lens stuff (it is a cleaner). Sea salt is by the food.

For the salts, use as much salt as you do alcohol. For the boric acid, put in as much as you have alcohol, then add more until it gets thicker and souplike. Mix the stuff well and let it sit for a while before lighting. Additives usually decrease burning time. None of the additives are good after burning. They will be smelly, crusty, and you will actually have to scrape out some bit of the boric acid. Throw this stuff away after each use.

Here is a list of all the things you will need or may want for the fire scrying: A metal bowl, rubbing alcohol, a damp towel, a pitcher of water, a long candle, matches, or lighter, burn cream, fire extinguisher, Epsom or other salt, boric acid.

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