Posts Tagged With: LORE

Crystal of the Day for November 21 – Carnelian

Crystal of the Day

Carnelian

 

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Carnelian is the clear red to brownish red member of the Chalcedony family. It is a microcrystalline variety of Quartz (Silicone Dioxide) and may contain small amounts of iron oxides. The hardness is 7, and the streak is white.

ENVIRONMENT: Chalcedony is formed in several environments, generally near the surface of the earth where temperatures and pressures are relatively low. It commonly forms in the zone of alteration of lode and massive hydrothermal replacement deposits and as bodies of chert in chemical sedimentary rocks.

OCCURENCE: Fine carnelian comes from India and South America.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Carnelian is used as an alternate birthstone for the month of May. It is normally cut into cabochons, engraved, or made into seal stones or rounded, polished, and pierced for necklaces and other items of jewelry.

NAME: The name means “flesh-colored”, from [caro], meaning “genitive” and [carnis], meaning “flesh”.

LEGEND and LORE: Carnelian has long been associated with courage and cleansing of the blood. It was believed that the stone would improve one’s outlook, making the individual cheerful and expelling fears.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Katrina Raphaell says that Carnelian can be used to “see into the past”. The “Crystal Oracle” says that Carnelian refers to the Self, and Current Conditions. It is a grounding stone, and associated with the Earth. As such, it is considered practical, sensible and balanced. Cunningham associates the stone with the element of Fire. He suggests it as a talisman against Telepathic invasion.

HEALING: It is recommended for infertility or impotency. In addition it is used for purification of the blood. It has also been suggested that this stone will stop nosebleeding.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I call this the “sexy” stone…since I believe it stimulates sexual appetites. I use it in the lower Chakras for infertility and impotency for men(I use Coral as the feminine counterpart.) I always get a good chuckle when I notice a man wearing a LARGE Cornelian belt buckle. In addition, I would use this stone for relief of pain from arthritis in men.

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals”.

2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from “Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from “Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

5. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

6. Some of the healing information may come from “A Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

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Gemstone of the Day for August 14 is Jade

JADE (TREMOLITE)
SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Tremolite is a calcium, magnesium and iron silicate. When the iron content is high, it is called actinolite. The chemistry is Ca2(mg,Fe)5Si8O22(OH)2. The streak is colorless, although the mineral itself can range in color from white to dark grey, yellowish, pink to lilac. We commonly tend to think of “jade” as green, but as you can see, it is actually available in many colors. The hardness is between 5 and 6.
ENVIRONMENT: Tremolite is a product of metamorphism and occurs with calcite and grossular in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks and with talc in serpentinites of hydrothermal metamorphic rocks.
OCCURRENCE: There are many localities where fine tremolite specimens may be obtained. Crystals of up to 3″ in length occur in marble at Haliburton and Wilberforce, Haliburton Co., Ontario and granular masses of pink tremolite (hexagonite) at De Kalb, St. Lawerence Co., New York. White and greenish crystals occur in calcite at Canaan, Litchfield Co., Connecticut.
GEMSTONE DATA: The Amphibole mineral nephrite, which consists of combined tremolite and actinolite, is dense, compact, tough.  Semitransparent to translucent varieties of nephrite are called [jade.] Nephrite jade colors are white, all shades of green, gray, grayish (with tinge of blue, red, or green), brown, and lavender. Value increases with transparency, intensity and evenness of color, and freedom from flaws. Jade is fashioned into beads, earrings, and cabochons for rings and brooches, or carved into ornamental or religious objects. Nephrite jade comes from Alaska, British Columbia, Wyoming, China and Siberia.
NAME: Tremolite is from the occurrence in Val Tremolo in the Swiss Alps. The word ‘jade’ is derived from the Spanish [pietra d'ijada] which means ‘colic stone’. In China, where jade has been venerated for thousands of years, over a hundred different names are in use for different color varieties.
LEGEND and LORE: Jade ornaments and implements of great antiquity have been discovered both in those parts of the world in which the mineral is found and in places far distant from these. It is the ‘greenstone’ so highly esteemed by the Maoris of New Zealand who carved it into pendants, sometimes representing their hero Tiki, and into chieftains’ war clubs.  It has been carved in Central America for well over a thousand years and the ancient Mayas prized it above gold. In ancient China a prospective bride would present her betrothed a jade butterfly to seal their engagement. Likewise the bridegroom would give his sweetheart a gift of jade before their wedding.
MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Jade is considered one of the most important symbols of purity and serenity. It is also revered as an ancient symbol of love. The Maoris regard Jade as a stone that brings luck, especially specimens that are dark olive-green in color. The ancient Chinese felt that Jade helps to inspire the mind to make quick and precise decisions. The ancient trader would often hold this gem in the palm of his right hand while he engaged in business transactions. Carved into a scarab, Jade is said to bring its owner a long and prosperous life. It is also said that wearing Jade while gardening will improve the health of the plants. Similarly, small pieces of Jade can be buried along the perimeter for this purpose. It is worn for protection during defensive magical workings.
HEALING: Jade has been called “colic stone”, “spleen stone” and “stone of the loins”. It is said that by tying jade to the arm, stones in the kidneys can be expelled. The ancient Greeks used this mineral for healing ailments of the eyes. Wearing Jade helps the body to heal itself while working on the underlying, nonphysical problems which cause the disease in the first place.
PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I use Jade as a Heart Chakra stone, for those that feel threatened or frightened. I’ve also used it to control swelling of various glands in the face and neck, by placing it directly over the gland. Before I had a piece of Malachite, I used it on my broken arm. It seemed to help the break heal. It was NOT successful on the damage done to the nerves and tendons in my wrist, however. The Malachite worked better.
——-bibliography——-
1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) “The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals”.
2. Additional information about the Name and Legends and Lore are from “Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.
3. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.
4. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.
5. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and notebooks, by Tandika Star.


Jade wards off infantile disease if placed around the neck and not removed. It is placed in the mouth of a corpse to protect the soul. Necromancers used it to raise the soul. Jade bracelets are worn to promote a long life and as a charm to prevent eye infection. It is considered to be the concentrated essence of love. It makes a good healing talisman for the kidneys, urinary and digestive problems.
To Ritualists, it embodies the five cardinal virtues of the pentacle.
- Spirit Justice – Earth Charity – Water Courage – Fire Modesty – Air Wisdom -
It also makes a good gambling talisman, especially for racing.
Compiled by Lady Hathor – The Silver Circle – Toronto, Ont.


JADE:    Strengthens  heart,  kidneys,  immune  system. Helps cleanse blood.  Increases longevity and fertility. Aids eye disorders and female problems.  Powerful  emotional balancer.  Radiates divine,   unconditional   love. Clarity,  modesty, courage, justice, wisdom. Peaceful and nurturing.  Dispels negativity.  Healing affinity will correspond to particular color of stone.
By Legion of Light

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OPAL

OPAL

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Opal is hydrous silica, often with some iron and
aluminum. Its chemistry is SiO2.nH2O; amount of water varies up to 10
percent. It ranges in color from White, yellow, red, pink, brown to
gray, blue and even colorless. It is most easily recognized by its rich
internal play of colors (opalescence). Its hardness ranges from 5-1/2 to
6-1/2. It is vitreous and pearly. The streak is white. It is not found
in crystal form, rather is is usually massive, botryoidal, reniform,
stalactitic, and/or earthy.

ENVIRONMENT: Opal is a low-temperature mineral and usually develops in
a wide variety of rocks as cavity and fracture fillings. It requently
develops as amygdules in basalt and rhyolite of volcanic rock and
replaces the cells in wood and the shells of clams.
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OCCURENCE: Common opal is widespread and can be readily obtained at many
places, but localities for precious opal are rare and seem to localized
in W United States and Mexico. Magnificent examples of opalized wood can
be found in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, and lively
green fluorescing opal (hyalite) occurs in seams in pegmatites in New
England and North Carolina and in cavities in basalt near Klamath Falls,
Oregon. Beautiful precious opal, as a replacement in wood, has been
obtained in Virgin Valley, Humboldt Co., Nevada.  Excellent fire and
precious opal occur in laval flows in N Mexico. Nevada, Australia, and
Honduras are sources for black opal; Australia and Czechoslovakia
for white opal; Mexico and SW United States for fire opal.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Black, dark blue, dark green opal with dark gray
body color and fine play of colors is called [black opal;] opal with
white or light body color and fine play of color is called [white opal;]
and transparent to translucent opal with body color ranging from
orange-yellow to red and a play of colors is called [fire opal.] Play of
colors depends upon interference of light and is not dependent upon body
color. Black opal is the most highly prized, and fire opal is the most
valued of the orange and red varieties. Most opal is fashioned into
cabochons, but some fire opals are faceted.

NAME: The word is from the Sanskrit [upala,] meaning “precious stone.”

LEGEND and LORE: Opal is a birthstone for October.

“October’s child is born for woe,
And life’s vicissitudes must know;
But lay an  Opal on her breast,
And hope will lull those foes to rest.” (5)

Opals have traditionally been considered “lucky” stones…but only for
those born in the month of October. It has been considered bad luck to
wear them if you were born in any other month.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Opal is considered to be able to confer the gift of
invisibility on its wearer. To accomplish this, Cunningham says “The gem
was wrapped in a fresh bay leaf and carried for this purpose.” He also
says, “Opals are also worn to bring out inner beauty. A beauty spell:
Place a round mirror on the altar or behind it so that you can see your
face within it while kneeling.  Place two green candles on eithe side of
the mirror. Light the candles. Empower an opal with your need for beauty
– while holding the stone, gaze into your reflection. With the scalpel
of your visualization, mold and form your face (and your body) to the
form you desire. Then, carry or wear the opal and dedicate
yourself to improving your appearance.” (2)

HEALING: Opals contain all the colors of the other stones, thus, it
could be used in place of any of them. (They are akin to quartz
crystals, in this aspect.) Generally speaking, Opal is used more
frequently for healing the spirit, rather than the physical body.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: Opals are probably my favorite stone. This may be
partially due to the fact that they are my birthstone, and I have been
surrounded by them all of my life. For me, they are protective and
invigorating. I normally use them during Journeying, and when doing
“readings” for other…anything where I am using altered states of
consciousness. I find that they help me to understand the symbols of my
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visions in a way that makes them meaningful for others.

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurance and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En-
cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and
notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

5. Birthday poem from “The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious
Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

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MOONSTONE

MOONSTONE

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Moonstone is one variation of Orthoclase. It
owes its beautiful silvery to bluish sheen (‘adularescence’ or ‘schil-
ler’) to its composition of extremely thin plates of orthoclase and
albite. The thinner these plates are, the bluer is the sheen. There are
also moonstones consisting mainly of albite. These are less translucent,
but they can occur in a variety of colours: grey, blue, green, brown,
yellow and white. There are also moonstone cat’s-eyes. The chemical
composition is KAlSi3O8 and the hardness is 7. The streak is white.

ENVIRONMENT: The potash feldspars are important rock-forming minerals in
plutonic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks. Adularia and sanidine are
found usually in volcanic rocks.

OCCURENCE: The main countries of origin are Ceylon, southern India (the
district near Kangayam), Tanzia and Malagasy which, together with Burma,
produces some of the finest stones with a deep blue schiller. White
adularia crystals up to 2.5 cm (1″) across have been found in gold-bear-
ing quartz veins at Bodie, Mono Co., California, and in the silver mines
of the Silver City district, Owhyee Co., Idaho.

GEMSTONE INFORMATION: Moonstone is always cut into cabochons, to display
the cat’s-eye, or schiller.

NAME: Adularia (another name for Moonstone) comes from the locality in
Switzerland, the Adula Mts.

LEGEND and LORE: This stone has always been revered because of its lunar
attraction. It was believed that the shiller in the stone would follow
the cycles of the moon. (Becoming greatest when the moon was full.) In
addition, it has always been considered a “feminine, or Goddess” stone.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Meditation with moonstone calls into consciousness
the three-form moon phase goddesses, Diana/Selene/Hecate, the waxing,
Full and waning Moon. These are woman as goddess in her ages and
contradictions, Maiden/Mother/Crone. Cunningham favors this stone for
spells involving love. In addition he has a longish essay on using it
for a “diet” stone.

HEALING: Because of it’s feminine nature, Moonstone has long been
considered a “womans healing stone”. It is used traditionally for
healing/balancing of female organs and hormones.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I use Moonstone at the Transpersonal Point, for
connection to the Goddess and Universal Feminine Energy. This is the
connection to dreams and dreaming, feminine “intuition”, and “cycles”.
There are cycles of time, seasons, the moon, stars, etc. I also use/give
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this stone for those clients who are having difficulty being in tune
with the feminine side of their nature.  (Everyone has a masculine and
a feminine side.)

NOTES: In the past, this stone has also been called “Cylon Opal”.

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gemstones” by E. H. Rutland.

3. Other Precious and semi-precious gemstone information may come from
“Gem Cutting”, sec. ed., by John Sinkankas.

4. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En-
cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

5. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

6. Some of the healing information may come from “A Journey Through the
Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

7. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and
notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

8. Birthstone poem from “The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious
Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

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MALACHITE

MALACHITE

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Malachite is a basic copper carbonate. It’s
chemistry is Cu2CO3(OH)2. It ranges in color from emerald green thru
grass green to shades of silky pale green. The streak is light green.
It’s hardness is 3-1/2 to 4.  Crystals are rare. Most gem specimens
display distinctive concentric colorbanding; (alternating dark green and
light green bands.)

ENVIRONMENT: Malachite is a secondary copper mineral and develops in the
zone of alteration in massive, lode, and disseminated hydrothermal
replacement deposits.  Associated minerals are azurite, limonite, and
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chalcopyrite.

OCCURENCE: The copper mines at Bisbee, Chochise Co., Arizona, are famous
for their fine specimens of massive malachite and pseudomorphs of
malachite after azurite. Mines at Morenci in Greenlee Co., and at Globe
in Gila Co., Arizona, have yielded beautiful malachite specimens, of
which some consist of alternating layers of green malachite and blue
azurite. Fine malachite has also come from copper mines in California,
Nevada, Utah, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee.

NAME: The name is from the Greek [moloche], “mallow,” an illusion to the
mineral’s leaf-green color. Malachite is used as an ore of copper and as
a gemstone.

LEGEND and LORE: It is said that if malachite is worn, it will break
into pieces to warn the wearer of danger.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: Used to direct power towards magical goals.
Protective, especially towards children. According to Cunningham, “Small
pieces of malachite placed in each corner of a business building or a
small piece placed in the cash register draws customers. Worn during
business meetings or trade shows, it increases your ability to obtain
good deals and sales. It is the salesperson’s stone.” (2)

HEALING: If the malachite is of the blue-green variety, it can be
associated with the Sacral Center, or Splenic Chakra (Svadisthana).
Here, it’s energy branches to the left, to the spleen. (It is intended
in this position for those who are celebate.) In addition, if it is
grass-green, it can be used at the Lumbar/Solar Plexis Center. “When the
malachite is placed at the solar plexus and a piece of green jade is
placed at the heart center and a double-terminated quartz crystal is
placed between them, people may remember events that have been blocked
for years. They may cry or scream. As these buried emotions are brought
to the surface and released, a great weight is lifted and they soon feel
renewed.” (3)

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I am very careful about using Malachite. It has
been my experience that the emotions that it releases can be very
powerful, to the point of overwhelming some people. On the other hand,
if the individual is ready to deal with them (in a “growth” period) it
may work out just fine. You could “balance” the emotional content with
a pink stone (such as rose quartz) to cut down some on the intensity.

A few years ago, I broke my arm. To do so, I damaged the muscles and
nerves in my wrist. I was in a lot of pain, and was searching for what
I could do to help the situation. During a journey, I saw malachite, so
I found a malachite heart which I held in the palm of the broken arm
while meditating. I got a lot of relief from it. Now, if the wrist acts
up, I use the heart, taped over the wrist area when I go to bed at
night. It seems to help quite a bit. I now recommend malachite for
nerve/muscle damage with some success. (4)

——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurance and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

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2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En-
cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

4. Personal Experience is from MY personal experience, journals and
notebooks, by <grin> Tandika Star.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Gem of the Day for June 14 – LAZURITE (LAPIS LAZULI)

LAZURITE (LAPIS LAZULI)

 
SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Lazurite is a silicate of sodium calcium and aluminum, with some sulfur. It is a member of the sodalite group. It’s chemistry is (Na, Ca)8(Al,Si)12O24(S,SO)4. The color ranges in shades of blue from violet blue and azure blue thru greenish-blue. Lazurite is distinguished from sodalite by its deeper color and fine grain. It is also softer and lighter in weight than lazulite. It is dull to greasy and the streak is pale blue. The hardness ranges between 5 and 5-1/2.

 
ENVIRONMENT: Crystals are rare. It is usually granular, compact, massive. It forms in association with pyrite, calcite, and diopside in hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks. The opaque, vivid blue, light blue, greenish-blue, or violet-blue stone, consisting largely of lazurite but with appreciable amounts of calcite, diopside, and pyrite, is a rock called [lapis lazuli.] The stone is usually veined or spotted. Its value depends largely upon excellence and uniformity of color and absence of pyrite, although some purchasers prefer lapis with pyrite.

 
OCCURRENCE: Lazurite is a rare mineral in North America, but it does occur on Italian Mt. in the Sawatch Mts. of Colorado; on Ontario Peak in the San Gabriel Mts., Los Angeles Co., and in Cascade Canyon in the San Bernardino Mts., San Bernardino Co., California. The finest lapis lazuli has come from Badakshan in Afghanistan, and less valuable material has come from Russia and Chile.

 
NAME:  The name is from the Arabic [lazaward], “heaven,” which was also applied to sky-blue lapis lazuli.

 
LEGEND and LORE: Lapis Lazuli was a favorite stone of the ancient Egyptians. In the past Lazurite has been burned and ground to form the pigment “ultramarine.” It was consider an aid to childbirth, and has long been associated with altered states of consciousness and trance work. Lapis is sometimes designated as a birthstone for December, although turquoise is most common.

 
MAGICAL PROPERTIES: To quote Cunningham: “This stone is used in rituals designed to attract spiritual love. Take an untumbled piece of lapis with a sharp edge.  Empower the stone and a pink candle with your need for love. Then, using the lapis lazuli, carve a heart onto the candle. Place the stone near the candleholder and burn the candle while visualizing a love coming into your life.” Actually, the most important magical aspect of lapis is it’s ability to strengthen psychic awareness. Cunningham says “Despite its somewhat high price, lapis lazuli is one stone every stone magician should own and utilize.”(2)

 
HEALING: This stone is used at the Ajina, the Brow Chakra. It’s related gland is the pituitary. The pituitary gland is also referred to as the “master gland” because it regulates all of the others. This location is also the center for the eyes, ears, nose and brain.

——-bibliography——-
1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and Minerals”.
2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En- cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.
3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

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LAZURITE (LAPIS LAZULI)

LAZURITE (LAPIS LAZULI)

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION: Lazurite is a silicate of sodium calcium and
aluminum, with some sulfur. It is a member of the sodalite group. It’s
chemistry is (Na, Ca)8(Al,Si)12O24(S,SO)4. The color ranges in shades of
blue from violet blue and azure blue thru greenish-blue. Lazurite is
distinguished from sodalite by its deeper color and fine grain. It is
also softer and lighter in weight than lazulite. It is dull to greasy
and the streak is pale blue. The hardness ranges between 5 and 5-1/2.

ENVIRONMENT: Crystals are rare. It is usually granular, compact,
massive. It forms in association with pyrite, calcite, and diopside in
hornfels of contact metamorphic rocks. The opaque, vivid blue, light
blue, greenish-blue, or violet-blue stone, consisting largely of
lazurite but with appreciable amounts of calcite, diopside, and pyrite,
is a rock called [lapis lazuli.] The stone is usually veined or spotted.
Its value depends largely upon excellence and uniformity of color and
absence of pyrite, although some purchasers prefer lapis with pyrite.

OCCURRENCE: Lazurite is a rare mineral in North America, but it does
occur on Italian Mt. in the Sawatch Mts. of Colorado; on Ontario Peak in
the San Gabriel Mts., Los Angeles Co., and in Cascade Canyon in the San
Bernardino Mts., San Bernardino Co., California. The finest lapis lazuli
has come from Badakshan in Afghanistan, and less valuable material has
come from Russia and Chile.

NAME:  The name is from the Arabic [lazaward], “heaven,” which was also
applied to sky-blue lapis lazuli.
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LEGEND and LORE: Lapis Lazuli was a favorite stone of the ancient
Egyptians. In the past Lazurite has been burned and ground to form the
pigment “ultramarine.” It was consider an aid to childbirth, and has
long been associated with altered states of consciousness and trance
work. Lapis is sometimes designated as a birthstone for December,
although turquoise is most common.

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: To quote Cunningham: “This stone is used in rituals
designed to attract spiritual love. Take an untumbled piece of lapis
with a sharp edge.  Empower the stone and a pink candle with your need
for love. Then, using the lapis lazuli, carve a heart onto the candle.
Place the stone near the candleholder and burn the candle while
visualizing a love coming into your life.” Actually, the most important
magical aspect of lapis is it’s ability to strengthen psychic awareness.
Cunningham says “Despite its somewhat high price, lapis lazuli is one
stone every stone magician should own and utilize.”(2)

HEALING: This stone is used at the Ajina, the Brow Chakra. It’s related
gland is the pituitary. The pituitary gland is also referred to as the
“master gland” because it regulates all of the others. This location is
also the center for the eyes, ears, nose and brain.

                      ——-bibliography——-

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurrence and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En-
cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

EMERALD

EMERALD

SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION:Emerald is a type of Beryl, Beryllium aluminum
silicate, frequently with some sodium, lithium and cesium.It’s chemistry
is Be3Al2Si6O18. Beryls range in color from Bright green (emerald),
blue, greenish blue (aquamarine), yellow (golden beryl), red, pink
(morganite) to white. The streak is colorless. It’s hardness is 7-1/2 to
8. The crystals are Hexagonal and they are common. Fine emeralds have
velvety body appearance; their value lies in their even distribution of
color. Inclusions are common in emerald, but other stones of this group
are usually most valuable when free of flaws.

ENVIRONMENT: Beryl develops in pegmatites and certain metamorphic rocks.
It occurs with quartz, microcline, and muscovite in pegmatites, and with
quartz, muscovite, and almandine in schist of regional metamorphic
rocks.

OCCURENCE: Best emerald comes from Colombia.(NOTE: it is not necessary
to spend thousands of dollars for a tiny chip of emerald to add to your
healing/ magical collection. If you look around in rock shops, you may
be able to come across some “less than perfect” stones that aren’t
faceted. I’ve found 4 of them, slightly larger than my fingernail and
they were about $3.00 each.)

NAME: The name is from the Greek [beryllos] indicating any green
gemstone.

LEGEND and LORE: Emerald is considered a birthstone for the month of
May.

    “Who first beholds the light of day,
    In spring’s sweet flowery month of May,
    And wears an Emerald all her life,
    Shall be a loved, and happy wife.” (4)

MAGICAL PROPERTIES: “If you wish to bring a love into your life, buy an
emerald and charge it with your magical need through your visualization,
perhaps while placing it near a green candle. After this ritual, wear or
carry the emerald somewhere near your heart. Do this in such a way that
it cannot be seen by others. When you meet a future love, you’ll know it
wasn’t the visible jewel that attracted him or her.” (3) The Greeks
associated this stone with the Goddess Venus. It has come to represent,
for many people, the security of love.  Emerald, like allmost all of the
green stones, is also advantageous for business/money ventures.

HEALING: Emerald is said to aid perception and inner clarity. Because of
this, they are also associated with healing diseases of the eye, and
problems affecting eyesight. It was believed that emeralds could
counteract poisons and cure disentary.

……………………………………………………………………..

1. Scientific, Environment, Occurance and Name are from (or paraphrased
from) “The Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Rocks and
Minerals”.

2. Legends and Lore, Magical Properties are from “Cunningham’s En-
cyclopedia of Crystal, Gem & Metal Magic”, by Scott Cunningham.

3. Some of the healing information may come from “Color and Crystals, A
Journey Through the Chakras” by Joy Gardner. Other sources may be “Stone
Power” by Dorothee L. Mella.

4. Birthstone poem from “The Occult and Curative Powers of Precious
Stones” by William T. Fernie, M.D.

Categories: Crystals/Gems | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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