Tag Archives: Iceland

Today Is …

Egyptian Comments & Graphics

Today Is …

 

Children’s Day in Iceland. Celebrate with your own children or let the child within come out and play.

Saint Mark’s Eve. According to folklore of the English countryside, the ghosts of all men, women, and children destined to pass away in the next year can be seen floating by on this night by any person brave enough to spend the night awake on the front porch of a church. However, if a person was unfortunate enough to fall asleep during the vigil or if he failed to repeat it annually for the remainder of his life, he would never wake up the next morning.

In North Africa, this holiday is called Maimuna. The evening meal features dairy foods symbolizing birth and fertility: milk, figs, ears of wheat, pancakes with butter or honey. The table is decorated with a live fish in a bowl (like the table for St. Joseph (see Mar 19) or Nawruz (see Mar 20) and a bowl of flour containing golden rings. The following day is devoted to picnics at beaches, fields and in cemeteries.

The striking similarity of Maimuna to No Rooz (celebrated on Spring Equinox in Persia), plus its geographic location, suggests that this is a hybrid holiday, an integration of the old Zoroastrian New Year celebration with the rituals of Passover.
Waskow, Arthur, Seasons of Our Joy, Beacon 1982

Secretaries Day The Wednesday of the last full week in April has been designated as Secretaries Day, perhaps to provide secretaries with a welcome day off during a month with no other paid holidays. Having spent a large portion of my working life as a secretary, I always advocate for the honoring of this often overlooked and underestimated profession. Secretaries will get another chance to celebrate on August 25th, the feast day of their patron saint, St. Genesius of Arles.

April 24

Birthday of the Sun China
Children’s Day Iceland
Feast of the 3 Holy Maries
General Federation of Women’s Clubs’ “Federation Day”
Happenstance and Coincidence Evening Fairy
Library of Congress Day
National Concord Day Niger
National IBM Personal Computer Day
National PC/Typing Contest begins
National Pigs-in-a-Blanket Day
National Remberance of Man’s Inhumanity To Man Day
Native Son Day Alton, Illinois
Passover Judaism
Plumber’s Day
Professional Secretary’s Day
Rattlesnake Day Magnum, Oklahoma
St. Egbert’s Day
St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen’s Day
St. Mark’s Eve
St. Mellitus’ Day
Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day
Teach A Child To Save Day
Tulip Festival Netherlands

28 May 3:The three day Festival of Flora and Venus, or the Florialia in Rome; Goddess of Sexuality and Spring flowers.

30: Walpurgisnacht celebrated by German witches

Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Oct. 9th, Leif Ericson Day

magick89

October 9th

Leif Ericson Day

Born in Iceland sometime before 1000 A.D., Leif Ericson was the son of a Norseman, Eric the Red, who discovered and colonized Greenland. Leif left Greenland for Norway, where he was converted to Christianity. King Olaf commissioned him to convert the Vikings to Christianity, but on his way from Norway to Greenland he was blown off course and reached the coast of North America instead. It is believed that Leif Ericson landed in North America in 1004 (488 years before Christopher Columbus). There is some speculation as to who exactly discovered North America. As a mark of respect for Leif Ericson and the Norse explorers, the Congress of the United States authorized the President to proclaim October 9th of each year as Leif Ericson Day

Casting A Magickal Square

Casting A Magickal Square

The square is a very powerful symbol of protection. Even if your work within a circle you can still  designate as outer square as an additional protective enclosure. If you can’t have a permanent altar outdoors, your magick square can designate the  smaller space where you regularly set up your magickal tools.

It is also very protective of the home, even more so than a circle, and is an easier shape to cast  in many gardens than the circle. I draw one around my caravan with small stone makers if the site is very quiet or if I have to leave the caravan unoccupied  for a while.

It is effective also for keeping children or animals temporarily off lawns or flower beds you are  trying to grow.

You can visualize a protective square of any size, from a small one around a precious artifact to  one around a sacred site where you have organized a seasonal ritual.

They are very protective around natural circles such as groves where you would not draw a  circle.

Indeed, you can create a temporary square if you are working in a public spot and don’t want  your magick area invaded by dogs and curious coach parties. In modern times where working in isolated places may be less safe, you can visualize one around  the beach or forest while you are working or around yourself (as well as your protective circle) on a deserted station platform or taxi  tank.

Stand in the center of your designated square, which may also be the center of your projected magick  circle.

Hold out your arm as far as you can with your palm upright and outwards and say:

“Enough and no more, I draw my square of protection. Preserve this space as  sacred.”

Picture a line of light forming the top horizontal (west to east). Keep turning, making next the  vertical north-south line along the right east side as you face north. Speak and visualize till you have all four lines in place and can see a shimmering  outline to your square of light.

You can also walk your square from the furthest away top left-hand corner, moving clockwise and  ending at the nearest, bottom left corner. Use your wand in front of you and put a small dark stone at each corner and one halfway along each line. You can  align with a compass or estimate north in the middle of the top line furthest from you as you face north.

You can assign your midpoints, the main directions, to archangels or to the lofty Landvaetir, the  tall brown guardians who in Iceland, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Germany and eastern part of the UK are cognized as protecting land and all who live on it. You  can further protect the corners with the traditional taller dark stones if you are setting up a permanent magickal square.

Bless your square as you would a circle the first time you create it.

The Magick Square

The Magick Square

Squares have a strong folk magick traditions; a magickal square would be marked in a field with  hoes, takes or other agricultural implements. In times of persecution squares could be consecrated as a magickal space, but were much easier to disguise a  magickal workings than circles. Some were undoubtedly use to mark as sacred as magickal workings than circles. Some were undoubtedly used to mark as sacred  land where a former sacred Roman temple stood, just as a circle of stones or tree stumps beneath a church or cathedral might mark a former sacred Druidic  grove.

In Scandinavia, the magickal square formed the outline for a grid of nine squares, three by three.  These were made by the seior, the witch seers of the Norse world who channeled wisdom from the spirit world, specifically from Helheim where the crone  goddess Hel cared for the deceased. The seior sat on raised thrones within the grids and traveled astrally to Helheim to talk to the ancestors and receive  advice for the living. Only later did the goddess Hel become demonized and in recent years there has been a revival of seior craft.

The water witches of the West Midlands also used a magickal square, or mill as they called it, for  magick. They were people who came from the Netherlands to live and work on the Midland canals in the 1800s. They practiced an ancient form of folk magick  that did not die out till the mid-1900s and there are still a few practitioners remaining. Rituals were practices by these canal people on a square of land  adjacent to the canal bank within a triple magickal square. Each square was joined by four lines and constructed from wood and was known as the Mil. Only  women entered the sacred area under the leadership of a senior female water witch, through the chief male, known as the master, standing at the edge,  summoned a spirit entity to assist in the ritual.

In modern Iceland, the Landvaetir or Land guardians often have particularly sacred square fields  that cannot be built on, where offerings are left in order to bring protection to the homes and farms around.

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Volcano and Aurora in Iceland

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

Volcano and Aurora in Iceland  

Image Credit & Copyright: Sigurdur H. Stefnisson

 

 Explanation: Sometimes both heaven and Earth erupt.   In  Iceland in 1991, the  volcano Hekla erupted at the same time that  auroras were visible overhead.   Hekla, one of the most  famous volcanoes in the world, has  erupted at least 20 times over the   past millennium,  sometimes causing  great destruction.   The last eruption occurred only twelve years ago but caused only minor  damage.   The green auroral band occurred fortuitously about 100 kilometers above the erupting  lava.   Is Earth the Solar System’s only planet with both auroras and volcanos?

Invocation To Freyr

 Invocation To Freyr

“Freyr, Son of Njrd, Join us.
Freyr, Husband of Gerdr, Join us.
Freyr, Brother of Freyja, Join us.
Freyr, Father of kings, Join us.
Freyr, Whose sword would fight for itself, Join us.
Freyr, Who gave his sword for Gerdr, Join us.
Freyr, Patron of married couples, Join us.
Freyr, Most beautiful of Gods, Join us.
Freyr, Whose tooth-gift was Alfheimr, Join us.
Freyr, Master of Gullinbursti, Join us.
Freyr, Owner of Skidbladnir, Join us.
Freyr, Slayer of Beli, Join us.
Freyr, Master of Frodi’s Peace, Join us.
Freyr, Who directs Man’s good fortune, Join us.
Freyr, Who brings fruitful seasons, Join us. Freyr,
Your servant _______ calls you! Come to me NOW!”

WitchWay

Astronomy Picture of the Day for March 21

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos!Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2012 March 21
See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download the highest resolution version available.

Aurora Over Iceland
Image Credit & Copyright: Daniel Lopez (El Cielo de Canarias)  

 

Explanation: If you see a sky like this — photograph it. Three nights ago in Iceland, an adventurous photographer (pictured) chanced across a sky full of aurora and did just that. Afterwards, by stitching together five smaller photographs, the entire aurora-lit sky was recreated in this 180-degree panorama taken from Vatnajökull glacier. Auroras are sparked by energetic particles from the Sun impacting the magnetic environment around the Earth. Resultant energetic particles such as electrons and protons rain down near the Earth’s poles and impact the air. The impacted air molecules obtain excited electrons, and when electrons in oxygen molecules fall back to their ground state, they emit green light. Auroras are known to have many shapes and colors.

Earth Science Photo of the Day for November 17th

Krafla Volcano, Iceland

November 17, 2011

Krafla-IMG_1442

Photographer: Stu Witmer
Summary Author: Stu Witmer

 

Seen above is the water-filled maar (explosion crater) of Stora-Viti on the slopes of Krafla volcano near Reykjahlid, Iceland. There are actually two craters named Viti in Iceland: the other one is on the Askja volcano in the island’s central highlands. The Viti pictured here was blasted to life in 1724 at the beginning of the Myvatnseldar (“Myvatn fires”), a series of explosions, earthquakes, fires and flowing lava that lasted five years. Krafla sits atop the mid-Atlantic Ridge, one of the most geologically active spots on Earth. After a 250-year dormant period, Krafla erupted again from 1975 to 1984 (“Krafla Fires”). With all this activity it comes as no surprise that Iceland, known for its extensive use of geothermal energy, has a power station on the mountain just south of the lake. Photo taken September 10, 2011.

Photo details: Camera Maker: Canon; Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SD1300 IS; Focal Length: 5.0mm; Aperture: f/8.0; Exposure Time: 0.0050 s (1/200); ISO equiv: 80; Exposure Bias: none; Metering Mode: Matrix; White Balance: Auto; Flash Fired: No (enforced); Orientation: Normal; Color Space: sRGB.