Posts Tagged With: Horticulture

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Dec. 11th is The Tree

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Tree

The Tree symbolizes spiritual health and growth. The healthy tree is rooted in a rich, nurturing medium, has a strong trunk from which leaf laden branches fan out to capture the sun’s energy. The Tree represents a healthy spirit entrenched in experience and strengthened by wisdom. It is a spirit that is happy with itself, but continues reaching to become even wiser, more complete, happier, stronger. While The Tree represents a strong and independent spirit, it is also a life-force that owes much of its strength and growth to being surrounded by other healthy spirits.

As a daily card, The Tree denotes a time when your spiritual self is especially powerful and open for further growth. Now is a time for you to seek out streams of wisdom and knowledge that you can not only draw from but contribute to as well. Don’t disregard sources that seem improbable, as they often produce the most profound revelations and spiritual expansion.

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Calendar of the Sun for November 15th

Calendar of the Sun

15 Blutmonath

Nidhogg’s Blot

Color: Black
Element: Earth
Altar: On a black cloth set several bare tree branches in an earthenware vase, a horn of mead, and the figure of a dragon.
Offerings: Pieces of wood with the name of a missed duty scratched on them.
Daily Meal: Tree fruit such as apples or pears or cherries or peaches.

Invocation to Nidhogg

At the base of the great World Tree
Dwells a black dragon
Whose name is Nidhogg,
Whose sole task is gnawing
At the roots of Yggdrasil.
As quickly as it gnaws away,
New growth comes forth
In a never-ceasing spiral.
At the base of each soul
Dwells a black dragon
Whose name is Conscience,
Whose sole job is gnawing
On our blithe thoughtlessness.
As it gnaws and forces us
To do what should be done,
It clears away our disorder
And allows for new growth
In the tangle of our lives.
Teach us, gnawer at the roots,
How to listen and decide.

Chant:
Roots of the Tree,
Hidden, mysterious,
Reveal them to me,
Dragon of Earth.

(Each person shall snap a twig from the branches on the altar and take it with them, laying it under their pillow to remember Nidhogg and their own consciences. The mead is passed around and shared, and the remainder poured out as a libation to Nidhogg.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

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10 Ways to Recycle Christmas Trees

10 Ways to Recycle Christmas Trees

 

In the late 1800s, when decorating a tree for the holidays became popular,  evergreens were bedecked with such Earth-friendly decorations as strings of  popcorn, gilded nuts and luminous candles. Today, millions of people carry on  this tradition by bringing Christmas trees into their homes, adding an element  of splendor and festivity to their own celebrations — but also an element of  waste.

After the parties are over and the season has passed, the once-splendid  tree transforms into a browning living-room behemoth, and the job of disrobing  it of its trimmings and tossing it carelessly outside becomes just one more  household chore. Before you follow this unfortunate holiday tradition, take  heed: There are several ways to recycle your Christmas tree, giving new life to  both it and your New Year’s resolutions to live lighter on our planet.

1. Living Christmas trees that come with their roots intact  can, of course, be planted and enjoyed for many years. Pack the earth ball  containing the roots in a bucket with sawdust, potting soil or other mulch. Keep  the soil continually moist. Plant outdoors as soon as possible after  Christmas.

2. A whole Christmas tree makes an excellent bird feeder for your backyard.  Stick the tree in the ground or leave it in its stand. A wide variety of birds  will be attracted by suet, cranberry and popcorn strings, stale bread and dried,  chopped fruit in mesh bags. If you grow sunflower seeds, simply hang the whole  sunflower head on the tree. Your family will discover that chickadees, song  sparrows, cardinals and a host of other birds come for the food and stay for the  shelter.

3. Cut off all the branches and use the trunk to edge a garden. The trunk can  also be strategically placed in your garden as a resting spot for birds,  squirrels and other little critters.

4. Place whole evergreen boughs on perennial beds or nursery rows to protect  them from winter freezes and spring thaws. The boughs provide the steady  temperatures that most plants need. Or, just use the boughs as post-Christmas  house decorations.

5. Many communities throughout the country have tree-recycling programs, in  which trees are collected from residents and then chopped up and used as mulch  for plants in community parks and gardens. To find out if such a program exists  near you, call city hall. Or, have your tree chipped at a local garden center  and use it yourself for ground cover or mulch. (Or promise the gardener in your  life this belated gift!)

6. The trunk can be sawed into logs and burned in your fireplace. Note: Don’t  burn the branches, since they can send off sparks.

7. Both trunk and branches can be used by woodworking hobbyists to make any  number of items, such as Christmas reindeer, birdhouses, candlesticks or  paperweights. Feeling boldly confident? Try whittling your family portrait!

8. Use the needles to make aromatic potpourris and sachets to enjoy year-round. After  removing the decorations, strip branches of their needles, which will retain  their pungency indefinitely in brown paper bags.

9. If you still have your Christmas tree out in the yard when warm weather  appears, there’s still a use for it. If permitted in your community, burn the  branches and spread the ashes in your garden. The branches contain valuable  nutrients and minerals that can enrich the soil and help yield better flowers  and vegetables.

10. Last but not least: You can have a tree for the holidays without spending  money or needlessly destroying an evergreen if you make your own! (OK, so this  isn’t exactly recycling.) You may have plenty of evergreens in your yard in need  of pruning. Simply bundle a few large, pruned branches together and arrange,  tree-like, in a watertight container.

 

 

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The Gems of Yule, Ruby

Ruby

Because of its red color, ruby is the stone of love and passion. This stone is connected to  the heart and can help open the heart to the love of another or to aid the wearer in feeling compassion for others. A stone of fear, it can be worn to bring bravery to the wearer.

 

More Christmas Tree Comments

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I’ve Learned

I’ve Learned

  • I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow.
  • I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights.
  • I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they’re gone from your life.
  • I’ve learned that making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life.”
  • I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance.
  • I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back.
  • I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision.
  • I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one.
  • I’ve learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone.
  • People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.
  • I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn.
  • I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.

Oh, My Aging Funny Bone

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Herbal Etiquette

Herbal Etiquette

by Amber S.

When studying herbology within witchcraft, it is important to learn about how plants work and the best ways to gather our stores, whether they come from wild plants or plants in our garden. There is more to herbs and trees than meets the eye.
All things have a soul: rocks, trees, animals and people. The soul is the energy of an object that exists in the same place and time as the physical body. Things that exist on the physical plane can be seen on the astral plane because of their energy. When you remove part of a plant, it is customary and proper to ask before you take any part of it and thank the plant once you have finished.
Plants that you grow and raise in your garden do not need to be asked for their permission to take leaves and flowers. Because they depend on you for protection and sustenance, you can remove what you need when you need it. It is an understood relationship between the grower and the plants. They give their leave and fruit in exchange for protection and care. Prayers and spells should be said over the crop at significant times such as planting, watering, pruning, and harvesting.
Wild plants are a little different. these plants are dependant on themselves for their health and survival. When you remove part of a plant, you must first ask the plant. Do this by closing your eyes and imagine just for a moment what you want from the tree. Normally, you will get no answer in return or a feeling of acceptance, in which case, you may remove what you need. Occasionally, however, you will receive a feeling of mistrust or an uncomfortable feeling telling you that you may not remove any part of the plant, in which case, you must move on.

When gathering wild herbs:- Never remove the bark from a tree. Bark covers a tree to keep out disease and fungus just the way our skin does for us. removing the bark can result in infection and the death of the tree. If you need bark for a recipe, remove twigs instead and strip the bark from the removed twigs with a knife.
– Try not to remove the entire plant. If possible, take only a few leaves or flowers and move on.
-Always ask a plant before you remove any part of it.
-Always thank plants after you have taken from them.

Plants are very sacred to witches. All plants should be given homage when we take something from them. There are many different ways of giving thanks. Any act of devotion is acceptable. Traditionally, gifts of apple cider, milk, honey, tobacco, or prayer are given. You can also give shiny coins or fertilizer as a gift. If you have nothing to give, a prayer for the health and well-being of the plant is more than sufficient. Leaving gifts for the tree spirits is also a good thank-you idea. Fairies enjoy music. Performing a song and dance for them is also a good thing to do if you have not brought any gifts with you.

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Broom Purification

Broom Purification

 

Items You Will Need:

  • tree branch
  • brightly colored long-stemmed flowers
  • string or thread

 

The Spell:

Before dawn, take a branch from any tree.  Thank the tree for its gift and leave a coin or semi-precious stone at its base in payment. Next, obtain several brightly colored flowers on long stalks. Tie these flowers to the branch to fashion a sort of broom, then sweep the floor in every room  of the house, visualizing the flowers of the broom absorbing negativity and “evil” as you work.  Then, still before sunrise, leave the broom at the crossroads.  Traditionally this ritual is repeated at the first of each month.

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Daily OM for September 27 ~ Seasons of Beauty

Seasons of Beauty

Aging Gracefully

by Madisyn Taylor

As we cultivate our life, our beauty becomes as much about what we are creating and doing as it is about our appearance.

We tend to associate youth with beauty, but the truth is that beauty transcends every age. Just as a deciduous tree is stunning in all its stages—from its full leafy green in the summer to its naked skeleton during winter and everything in between—human beings are beautiful throughout their life spans.

The early years of our lives tend to be about learning and experiencing as much as we possibly can. We move through the world like sponges, absorbing the ideas of other people and the world. Like a tree in spring, we are waking up to the world. In this youthful phase of life, our physical strength, youth, and beauty help open doors and attract attention. Gradually, we begin to use the information we have gathered to form ideas and opinions of our own. As we cultivate our philosophy about life, our beauty becomes as much about what we are saying, doing, and creating as it is about our appearance. Like a tree in summer, we become full, expressive, beautiful, and productive.

When the time comes for us to let go of the creations of our middle lives, we are like a tree in autumn dropping leaves, as we release our past attachments and preparing for a new phase of growth. The children move on, and careers shift or end. The lines on our faces, the stretch marks, and the grey hairs are beautiful testaments to the fullness of our experience. In the winter of our lives, we become stripped down to our essence like a tree. We may become more radiant than ever at this stage, because our inner light shines brighter through our eyes as time passes. Beauty at this age comes from the very core of our being—our essence. This essence is a reminder that there is nothing to fear in growing older and that there is a kind of beauty that comes only after one has spent many years on earth.

 

Daily OM

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