Posts Tagged With: Horned God

Beltane to Litha

Litha Comments & GraphicsBeltane to Litha

 

Beltane (a greater Sabbat named for a Celtic God, which is otherwise known as either May Eve or May Day) hails the coming-together of the Horned God, now in the Phallic Lord, and the irresistible Godddess in a rapturous celebration of light and life. It is as though all of nature—not least the birds and bees—is abuzz at this time of year, energized by a potent combination of irrestible physical attraction and an equally compelling urge to procreate.

—-The Wicca Book of Days

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Beltane to Litha


Beltane Comments & Graphics

Beltane to Litha

 

Beltane (a greater Sabbat named for a Celtic God, which is otherwise known as either May Eve or May Day) hails the coming-together of the Horned God, now in the Phallic Lord, and the irresistible Godddess in a rapturous celebration of light and life. It is as though all of nature—not least the birds and bees—is abuzz at this time of year, energized by a potent combination of irrestible physical attraction and an equally compelling urge to procreate.

 

—-The Wicca Book of Days

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

WOTC Extra – The God


Egyptian Comments & Graphics

WOTC Extra – The God

 

The God has been revered for eons. He is neither the stern, all-powerful deity of Christianity and Judaism, nor is He simply the consort of the Goddess. God or Goddess, they are equal, one.

We see the God in the Sun, brilliantly shining overhead during the day, rising and setting in the endless cycle which governs our lives. Without the Sun we could not exist; therefore it has been revered as the source of all life, the warmth that bursts the dormant seeds into life and hastens the greening of the Earth after the cold snows of winter.

The God is also tender of the wild animals. As the Horned God He is sometimes seen wearing horns on His head, symbolizing His connection with these beasts. In earlier times, hunting was one of the activities thought to be ruled by the God, while the domestication of animals was seen to be Goddess-oriented.

The God’s domains include forests untouched by human hands, burning deserts and towering mountains. The stars, since they are but distant suns, are sometimes thought to be under His domain.

The yearly cycle of greening, maturation and harvest has long been associated with the Sun, hence the solar festivals of Europe which are still observed in Wicca.

The God is the fully ripened harvest, intoxicating wine pressed from grapes, golden grain waving in a lone field, shimmering apples hanging from verdant boughs on October afternoons.

With the Goddess He also celebrates and rules sex. The Wicca don’t avoid sex or speak of it in hushed words. It’s a part of nature and is accepted as such. Since it brings pleasure, shifts our awareness away from the everyday world and perpetuates our species, it is thought to be sacred. The God lustily imbues us with the urge that ensures our species’ biological future.

Symbols often used to depict or to worship the God include the sword, horns, spear, candle, gold, brass, diamond, the sickle, arrow, magical wand, trident, knife and others. Creatures sacred to Him include the bull, dog, snake, fish, stag, dragon, wolf, boar, eagle, falcon, shark, lizard and many others.

Of old, the God was the Sky Father, and the Goddess, the Earth Mother. The God of the sky, of rain and lightning, descended upon and united with the Goddess, spreading seed upon the land, celebrating Her fertility.

Today the deities of Wicca are still firmly associated with fertility, but every aspect of human existence can be linked with the Goddess and God. They can be called upon to help us sort through the vicissitudes of our existences and bring joy into our often spiritually-bereft lives.

This doesn’t mean that when problems occur we should leave them in the hands of the Goddess. This is a stalling maneuver, an avoidance of dealing with the bumps on the road of life. However, as Wiccans we can call on the Goddess and God to clear our minds and to help us help ourselves. Magic is an excellent means of accomplishing this. After attuning with the Goddess and God, Wiccans ask Their assistance during the magical rite that usually follows.

Beyond this, the Goddess and God can help us change our lives. Because the Deities are the creative forces of the universe (not just symbols), we can call upon Them to empower our rites and to bless our magic. Again, this is in direct opposition to most religions. The power is in the hands of every practitioner, not specialized priests or priestesses who perform these feats for the masses. This is what makes Wicca a truly satisfying way of life. We have direct links with the Deities. No intermediaries are needed; no priests or confessors or shamans. We are the shamans.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner

Scott Cunningham

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Yule To Imbolc


Yule Comments & Graphics

Yule To Imbolc

 

Witches and Wiccans alike celebrate the Winter Solstice with the lesser Sabbat of Yule (or Midwinter). This may be the year’s shortest day, but it heralds ever-lengthening hours of daylight as the sun grows in strength. For the Horned God has been reborn as the Sun Child, or Child of Promise, so that while we may still be light-deprived and shivering in the depths of winter, there is now real hope of being bathed in sunshine and warmth once again.

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The Goddess And The Horned God In Wicca

The Goddess And The Horned God In Wicca

 

Neither evocation nor invocation is part of modern witchcraft, however, and white witches do not recognize any demonic figures in their religion. When we refer to the Goddess and her son-consort, the Horned God of Wicca, we are referring to the archetype or source energies of the feminine and masculine aspects of ultimate power. They are the creative female and male principles, acting not in opposition to each other but as complementary and necessary parts of a whole. All the named goddesses and gods in witchcraft represent the different qualities of these supreme forms, for example the goddesses of the hunt, or specific forms in different cultures.

There are, of course, variations within Wicca; some traditions emphasise the importance of the Goddess, while others regard the Horned God as her equal, with each assuming different aspects according to the season and ritual. For example, the Goddess may appear as the Earth or Moon deity, and her male counterpart as the Corn God or the Sun.

 

Source:

Cassandra Eason

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THE STORY OF WICCA

THE STORY OF WICCA

Wicca, an alternative name for modern witchcraft is a positive, shamanistic nature religion with two main deities honored and worshipped in Wiccan rites. The Goddess (the female aspect and a deity related to the ancient Mother Goddess in her triple aspects of Maiden, Mother and Crone) and her consort, the Horned God (the male aspect). Their names vary from one Wiccan tradition to the next and some traditions use different deity names in both their higher and lower degrees.

Wicca often includes the practice of various forms of white magick (usually for healing purposes or as a counter to negativity), as well as rites to attune oneself with the natural rhythm of life forces marked by the phases of the moon and the four seasons.

Wicca (which is also known as the “Craft of the Wise” or often just “The Craft”) is considered by many to be both a monistic and pantheistic religion and is part of the modern Pagan resurgence or neo-Pagan movement, as many prefer to call it.

Today, most people who define themselves as Pagans use the word as a general term for native and natural religions, usually polytheistic and their members. In simple terms, it is a positive, nature-based religion, preaching brotherly love and harmony with and respect for all life forms. It is very similar to Native American spirituality. Its origins are found in the early human development of religion. Animistic deities gradually becoming redefined to become a main God or Goddess of all Nature. This God or Goddess (bearing different names at different times and in different places) can be found in nearly all of the world’s historic religious systems. Paganism does not oppose nor deny other religions. It is simply a pre-Christian faith.

The Wiccan religion is made up of various sects or “Traditions” such as Gardenerian, Alexandrian, Dianic, Tanic, Georgian, Ethnic Traditionalist and so on. Many of the traditions were formed and introduced in the 1960s and although their rituals, customs, myth cycles and symbolism’s may be different from one another, they all hold common principles of Craft law.

The main tenet of Wicca Craft is the Wiccan Rede, a simple and benevolent moral code that is as follows…

AN IT HARM NONE, DO WHAT THOU WILT.

In other words, be free to do your own thing. Provided that you in no way bring harm upon anyone, including yourself. (The Wiccan Rede is extremely important to bear in mind before performing any magickal spells or rituals, especially those which may be considered unethical or of a manipulative nature.) The Threefold Law (or Law of Three) is a karmic law of triple retribution which applies whenever you do something good or bad. For instance, if you use white magick (or positive energy) to do something good for somebody else, three times the good will come back to you in your lifetime. By the same token, if you use black magick (or negative energy) to bring harm unto others, the bad or “evil” will also return to you threefold in the same lifetime.

The followers of the Wiccan religion are called Wiccan or Witches. The word “Witch” applies to both male and female practitioners of the Craft. Male Witches or Wiccans are seldom, if ever, called warlocks. The word “Warlock” which is considered an insult in most Wiccan circles stems from the old english word “Waerloga,” meaning an “Oath-breaker” and was used derogatorily by the Christian Church as a name for a male witch.

Although Witches are proud to be a part of the Craft, there are some who object strongly to the use of the term “Witch,” feeling that the word stirs up too many bizarre images and misconceptions in the minds of those who are unfamiliar with the Craft and perhaps a bit reluctant to accept that which they do not clearly understand.

As Wicca Craft is a Nature-oriented religion, most of it’s members are involved in one way or another with the ecology movement and current environmental issues.

Wiccans do not accept the arbitrary concept of innate sin or absolute evil and they do not believe in a Heaven or Hell, other than those which are one’s own creations.

Wiccans do not practice any form of black magic or “evil,” nor worship devils, demons, or any evil entities and do not make attempts to convert members of other faiths to the Pagan way. Wiccans respect all other positive religions and feel that a person must hear the “Call of the Goddess” and truly desire within her or his own heart, without any outside proselytisation to follow the Wiccan path.

Many Wiccans take on one or more secret names (also know as “Eke-names”) to signify their spiritual rebirth and new life within the Wicca Craft. Eke-names are most sacred and are used only among sisters and brothers of the same path. When a Witch takes on a new name, she or he must be extremely careful to choose one that harmonizes in one way or another with numerical name-numbers, birth-numbers, or runic numbers. A well-chosen name vibrates with that individual and directly links her or him to the Craft.

Many Wiccans work together in small groups which are called covens. The coven (which can consist of up to 13 people) is led by a High Priestess and/or High Priest and gathers together to worship the Goddess, work magick and perform ceremonies at Sabbats and Esbats. The members of a coven are known as “Coveners” and the place where a coven meets is called the “Covenstead.”

Wiccans who work on their own, either by personal choice or by circumstance are called “Solitary” Witches.

Wiccans celebrate 8 Sabbats each year, making transitions in the seasons. There are 4 major (or grand) Sabbats and 4 minor (or lesser) ones. The major Sabbats are Candlemas, Beltane, Lammas and Samhain. The minor Sabbats are Spring Equinox, Summer Solstice, Autumn Equinox and Winter Solstice.

The Esbat is a monthly coven meeting held at least 13 times a year during each Full Moon. At the Esbat, Wiccans exchange ideas, discuss problems, perform special rites, work magick and healing and give thanks to the Goddess and the Horned God. A traditional “Cakes and Wine” or “Cakes and Ale” ceremony also takes place at the Esbat. During this ceremony, consecrated food and refreshments are served and coveners take time to relax and discuss important magickal subjects. The “Cakes and Wine” or “Cakes and Ale” ceremony is a traditional custom whenever a Wiccan ritual takes place and the circle is cast.

In a coven, the Goddess is represented by the High Priestess and the Horned God by the High Priest.

The Goddess is known by many different names. She is often called Diana, Cerridwen, Freya, Isis, Ishtar, The Lady or any other name that a coven chooses to use or that a Wiccan feels responds to his or her own mythical vision.

The Goddess is the female principle. She represents fertility, creation, the regenerative powers of nature and wisdom. The moon is her symbol and in works of art, she is often depicted as having three faces, each representing a different lunar phase. In her New Moon phase she is the Maiden; in her Full Moon phase she is the Mother; and in her Waning Moon phase she is the Crone.

The Horned God is a phallic deity of fertility and intellectual creativity who symbolizes the powers of the waxing and waning crescent moons. He is usually represented by a hirsute and bearded man having the hooves and horns of a goat. He is a God of Nature and the male counterpart to the image of the Goddess. In primitive times, He was worshipped as the Horned God of Hunting.

Like the Goddess, the Horned God is also known by many different names. In some Wiccan traditions, He is called Cernunnos, which is Latin for “the Horned One.” In others, He is known as Pan, Woden and other names.

The worship of the Goddess and the Horned God symbolize the Wiccan belief that everything that exists in the universe is divided into opposites: female and male, negative and positive, light and darkness, life and death, yin and yang, the balance of Nature.

Source:

Empathy’s Mystical Occult Site

 

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Traditional Witchcraft

Traditional Witchcraft

 

Witchcraft is often referred to as “The Old Religion” and “Craft of the Wise.” Witchcraft has been present since the beginning of humanity in many forms. It was never a defined, organized religion, particularly not a universal one, but it was everywhere, as it is now. Those who practice Witchcraft are called Witches, no matter what their sex. A very common misconception is that a warlock is a male Witch. This could not be further from the truth. Warlock means “Oath breaker” and can be applied to either sex. Basically it is someone who betrays the trust of a coven. Witches are not evil-doers, rather, they are the most moral, most aware and sensitive people you will ever come across. They realize that every action has a reaction in every reality. Witches abide by a code of “Harm none, do as thou will.” This rule can be interpreted in many ways, but in short, it means do as you wish, and be sure not intentionally harm any innocent.

Witches tend to be pantheists, that is they recognize the divine in all things. Most Witches in some fashion worship the Goddess and her consort, the Horned God. The Horned God is a deity of fertility and festivity, often represented by a man with deer antlers or a satyr-like being, as artefacts of Pan and Cernunnos depict. One can easily see now where the Christian concept of the devil originated. It is always wise to remember that the gods of the old religions become the devils of the new in many western cultures. So never have Witches worshipped “the devil” as Christianity portrays. We actually find the idea of personifying evil rather stupid, for if you give something a name, you give it power. Witches, likewise, don’t believe in Hell. We cannot believe in an “all-loving” god that would send its own children to damnation, simply because they did not worship him in a certain form. Instead, Witches believe in a transient-like afterlife, sometimes called the Summer-lands, as well as reincarnation. Most Witches practice magick or spell-craft, following along the lines of “harm none.” Magick cannot be defined as “black” or “white,” because of the complexity of the results. For more about magick, go to Magick, Symbols and Spell-craft.

                                       What is the Modern Tradition of Witchcraft?


Usually people’s first reaction to ModTrad is “Isn’t that an oxymoron?.. How can something be modern and traditional?” Well, the key to it is that we examine the traditions and folklore of the past, and decipher a way to interpret them in a contemporary format that relates better to humanity’s needs today. Modtrad incorporates a system of careful research, reflection and ingenuity. Although most of us fantasize about living out in the middle of nowhere, being self-sufficient, close to the earth, the reality is that most of us lead urban-based lives. When one examines the eight sabats on the wheel of year, one discovers that they are planting/harvest/farming based. How does this relate to us now, living in the concrete jungle, lacking fields and livestock? How do we keep the meaning and intention in something that seems outdated? How does this reflect through all the aspects of the Craft, such as spell craft and our view of the Goddess? This is the challenge of Modern Traditional Witchcraft.

Source:

Empathy’s Mystical Occult Site

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WOTC’s Extra – Goddesses/Gods You Can Call On for Specific Spellworking

Goddesses You Can Call Upon for Specific Spellwork:

Aphrodite: Greek; Goddess of passionate, sexual love.
Aphrodite will assist you in pulling loving energy toward yourself.
Aradia: Italian; Queen of the Witches, daughter of Diana.
Aradia is an extremely powerful entity and a protectress of Witches in general.
Artemis: Greek; Goddess of the Moon.
Astarte: Greek; Fertility Goddess.
Whether you wish to bear children or have a magnificent garden, Astarte will assist in your desire.
Demeter: Greek; Earth Mother archetype.
Excellent Goddess where birthing or small children are involved.
Diana: Roman; Moon Goddess and Goddess of the Hunt. Diana is many faceted.
She is seductress (as she enchanted her brother Lucifer to beget Aradia in the form of a cat) as well as a mother figure for Witches.
Isis: Egyptia; represents the Complete Goddess or the Triple Goddess connotation in one being.
Persephone: Greek; Goddess of the Underworld as well as Harvest. Daughter of Demeter.
Selene: Greek; Goddess of the Moon and Solutions.
Appeal to Selene to bring a logical answer to any problem.
Venus: Roman; Goddess of Love and Romance

 

Gods You Can Call Upon for Specific Spellwork:

Adonis: Greek; consort of Aphrodite. Also another name for “lord”.
In Phoenician his counterpart is Astarte.
A vegetarian God. Roman counterpart is Venus.
Apollo: Greek and Roman; twin brother of Artemis. God of the Sun, Light and the Arts.
Cernunnos: Celtic; Horned God and consort of the Lady. Also Kernunnos.
Eros: Greek; God of Romance and Passionate Love.
Hymen: Greek; God of Marriage and Commitment. His counterpart is Dionysus.
Luce: Italian; Soul mate and Brother of Diana. Father of Arcadia. God of the Sun and Light.
Osiris: wiccan; counterpart of Isis. Over-all God form including vegetation and after-life.
Pan: Greek; God of Nature and the Woods, Laughter and Passion.
Also music and personal abandon. Of course, you can refer to either the God and/or Goddess as merely Lord and Lady if it makes you feel more comfortable.

 

 

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Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Deities, The Goddesses, The Gods | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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