Posts Tagged With: Hong Kong

Candle Dressing Oil

 Dressing Oil

Based on an oil recipe handed down to me for dressing candles before ritual

What you need:

2 dram (10mL) clean amber or cobalt vial sweet almond oil (has vitamin E
for preservation)
6 drops sandalwood mysore e.o.
3 drops myrrh e.o.
3 drops frankincense e.o.

Add the essential oils to the bottle and swirl them gently in order to get them
blended. Add any crystals (make sure they are clean too) and then add your base
oil to top the bottle off. I don’t use crystals in all my blends but some people
add crystals to their magical blends to keep them charged with a specific
intention. Make sure to keep the oils stored away from light and write on a
sticker or piece of paper to be taped on the name of the blend, time, date, moon
phase, planetary hour and any other info you wish so that you know what you made and when for use later. As well, be careful as these blends will eventually go off so use your sniffer and be aware of what the blend should smell like. Once
it seems off, you can discard it, clean the bottle and start a fresh! Make sure
it is completely clean and if it cannot be completely cleaned, discard and use a
fresh one.
Remember – essential oils can cause reactions and oils like citrus can cause
photosensitivity so please – be careful ~ Herbs can be dangerous.

Essential oils are volatile so bottles left with tops off will soon lose their
potency. Ensure that oils don’t get too hot and, in the case of oils like
citrus-based oils, not too cold. To test your essential oils to see if they are
pure, put a drop or two on blotter paper. Genuine essential oils will evaporate
completely.

Contributed by Red Wolf

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Daily Feng Shui News for Oct. 21st – ‘Information Overload Day’

Coming right after yesterday’s ‘Information Overload Day’ is another day that suspects that you have your head in the clouds. It’s ‘National Clean Your Virtual Desktop Day’ and I’m sensing a clutter theme — in this case, tech clutter like unreturned emails and voice messages, undeleted texts and old bookmarks. All this clutter can have the same negative effect as physical clutter. Take some time today to clean up your virtual mess and you’ll feel much more confident and clear.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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Your Daily Mahjong Tile for May 20th is Circles 3: The Phoenix

Your Daily Mahjong Tile
    May 20, 2013 

Circles 3
Symbol: Phoenix
The Phoenix tile indicates great happiness and joy. The Phoenix is said to be reborn out its ashes. Accordingly the Phoenix tile also denotes sure recovery from any setbacks encountered.

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Why Does The Chinese New Year Date Change Every Year?

Chinese New Year

By , About.com Guide

If you live in an area that has a Chinatown, chances are that at some point you’ve watched the Chinese New Year celebrations. However, Chinese New Year (also called the Spring Festival) doesn’t begin and end on a single weekend. Instead, the Spring Festival lasts a full fifteen days, with preparations beginning before the old year has come to a close. By the time the New Year arrives, families have already spent several days preparing for the big event; cleaning the house, buying gifts, and cooking festive foods.

People often wonder why the date for Chinese New Year changes each year. The Chinese calendar  is a combination solar/lunar calendar, based on a number of rather complex astronomical calculations, including the longitude of the sun. Chinese New Year falls on the second new moon after the winter solstice (all months begin with a new moon). In 2013, Chinese New Year Day falls on February 10th.

How did Chinese New Year come to be celebrated? According to an ancient legend, people were once tormented by a beast called a Nian – a ferocious creature with an extremely large mouth, capable of swallowing several people in a single bite. Relief from the Nian came only when an old man tricked the beast into disappearing. In reality, New Years festivities probably evolved from a desire to celebrate the end of winter and the fertility and rebirth that come with the spring, much like the ancient Roman festival of Lupercalia. Today, New Years is about family reunions and wishing everyone good fortune in the coming year.

The Spring Festival is China’s major traditional holiday, and is also celebrated in other parts of Southeast Asia, including Vietnam (where New Year’s Day is called “Tet”), Malaysia, Taiwan, and of course, Hong Kong. However, in my research I couldn’t find any mention of Chinese New Year’s celebrations in Japan. Lisa Heupel, an expert on Japanese Culture, came up with a possible reason – apparently the Japanese followed the lunar calendar until the middle of the nineteenth century. However, after the Meiji Restoration in 1868, they adopted the Gregorian calendar. Since that time New Years is celebrated on January 1st. While there are other popular festivals celebrating the arrival of spring, such as Hanami or the cherry blossom viewing festival, for the most part Chinese New Year goes unnoticed in Japan, except for a few small celebrations by the Chinese who live there.

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Your Daily Feng Shui Tip for June 27

Whether or not today is your birthday, I’m acting as if it is and celebrating you! So here’s a gift that keeps on giving with all my good wishes and love! Buy five helium-filled balloons, one of each of the following colors: red, yellow, white, pink and purple — never use blue, green or black balloons! Tie a tail on each balloon with nine or eighteen inches of red ribbon, string or thread. Use a new black felt-tip marker to write on each balloon one treasured wish that completely describes your heart’s desires. You can have five different wishes or write the same wish on all five balloons. Then take the balloons to an open space and release the ‘wish’ balloons one at a time. Visualize them turning into small golden orbs that are heading into the mouth and belly of the Sky Dragon. In gratitude for filling his tummy, he will then make your wishes come true sometime within the next year. Blow up your birthday and make a wish! This time you can count on it coming true!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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Dragon’s Breath in the Earth

Dragon’s Breath in the Earth

 
 
Many of the old legends speak of killing the dragon. Sometimes, the real meaning of this term is clarified when one is told that the dragon continued to live. Of course, if you are reading Christianized stories of dragons, the dragon is always killed by a faithful saint or hero; this is a less than subtle reference to Christianity “killing” Paganism. But a great many of the legends were in existence long before Christians came along; therefore the term “killing” must mean something far different than destroying your religious rivals.
 
If you look at ancient Egyptian paintings of Horus and his Sun Boat sailing over Apep, sometimes called Apophis, serpent of the Underworld and the dead or winter season, and read the ancient stories of these daily and seasonal voyages, you become aware that the word “killing” has another meaning. The picture show the God Set “staking” or guiding Apep by a series of rods driven into the ground. A similar practice is still used to control or change the Earth’s energy in certain areas of the world in the belief that out-of-control dragon energy adversely affects humans, crops, animals and the land in general.
 
The Chinese emphasized the importance of controlling the “dragon’s breath” in architecture and landscape. This is still a respected belief in Hong Kong and other places having Chinese communities. There are professionals adept at finding imbalances of the dragon’s breath, and they are in demand, not only by home owners, but by businessmen. If a series of unexplained illnesses or misfortunes strike a business, for instance, the owner will go though the ordinary procedure to discover the cause. If there is nothing found, or nothing appears to alleviate the problem, he will send for a person skilled in detecting a disruption of dragon’s breath; this person is called a Feng-shui diviner.
 
A visit to the premises is made. This Feng-shui diviner sometimes uses a special magnetic compass that has as many as 38 concentric rings around the needle. Each ring is divided into special traditional measurements of space and time. The diviner takes sightings along what are called the vains of the dragon. These veins are raised features of the landscape, such as trees, rocks, watercourses, valleys, etc. Within buildings, the diviner considers such things as doorways, halls, the directions of corners, and so on. Any recommendation made by the diviner are implemented with great seriousness. If possible a small garden, aligned in certain ways, is made outside for the dragons of the region. Inside a shine is placed in a particular corner or area to accommodate the reigning draconic being. Dragon images are placed in both the garden and the shrine to honor the dragon, and also to remind it of its good fortune to be recognized and given respect by the human residnets.
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Celebrations Around the World, Jan. 22

Erotic Festival Day
Festival of the Orgone
St. Vincent’s Day (patron of winegrowers, schoolgirls, vinegar makers)
Dance of the 7 Veils Day
Festival of Invoking & Banishing
Answer Your Cat’s Question Day
Ukranian Day
Saints Day
National Blond Brownie Day
St. Timothy’s Day (Greek)
Goddess Month of Hestia ends
Munich Ballet Festival begins
Hong Kong Arts Festival begins

Mayan Chronological Estimation: A Good Day For Those Who Walk In The Country.

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What Does The Number 8 Mean?

  • Eight (八; accounting 捌; pinyin ) is considered a lucky number in Chinese culture because it sounds like the word meaning to generate wealth (發(T) 发(S); Pinyin: ). Property with the number 8 may be valued greatly by Chinese. For example, a Hong Kong number plate with the number 8 was sold for $640,000. The opening ceremony of the Summer Olympics in Beijing started at 8 seconds and 8 minutes past 8 pm (local time) on 8 August 2008.
  • Eight (八, hachi, ya) is also considered a lucky number in Japanese culture, but the reason is different from that in Chinese culture. Eight gives an idea of growing prosperous, because the letter (八) broadens gradually.
  • The Japanese thought eight (や, ya) as a holy number in the ancient times. The reason is less well understood, but it is thought that it is related to the fact they used eight to express large numbers vaguely such as manyfold (やえはたえ, Yae Hatae) (literally, eightfold and twentyfold), many clouds (やくも, Yakumo) (literally, eight clouds), millions and millions of Gods (やおよろずのかみ, Yaoyorozu no Kami) (literally, eight millions of Gods), etc. It is also guessed that the ancient Japanese gave importance to pairs, so some researchers guess twice as four (よ, yo), which is also guessed to be a holy number in those times because it indicates the world (north, south, east, and west) might be considered a very holy number.
  • In numerology, 8 is the number of building, and in some theories, also the number of destruction.
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