Posts Tagged With: Goddess

“GOOD MORNING WOTC!” What A Beautiful Tuesday The Goddess Has Given Us!

See us, 0 Goddess

Wise and warm

We am your children

And we search for answers

Our visions are at times clouded

And so we ask for clarity during

These times of cloudiness and cluttered minds

Our hearts is uncertain

And so we ask for clarification

Help me, 0 Goddess

To find our paths

And reveal our true selves.

So Mote It Be

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Deity of the Day for July 14th is Hecate, Goddess Of Witchcraft

Deity of the Day

Hecate

Goddess of Witchcraft

 

Hecate (or Hekate) is the Goddess of Witchcraft and of Justice. She is also a Goddess of the Underworld, Secrets and Wisdom. Hers is the power of knowing. She is often seen as a dark force, but she is a protector of women and those who seek justice. Her justice is like that of the hounds that accompany her: simple, direct, swift and uncompromising.

This Goddess’ quest for pure justice, combined with her witchcraft and secret knowledge, can be seen as harsh by many modern cultures. As a result, this type of justice is sometimes seen by many people as vengeance. However, she is not interested in simple vengeance; justice is a much in raising up the just as it is in bringing down the unjust.

The Goddess is most often seen depicted with dogs. There is some debate about the meaning of this, but it is thought to be either a symbol of birth or of death. She is a Goddess of both. She is the Goddess of the Crossroads – not only in this world, but between this world and the next. Although most often associated with dogs, she is also associated with frogs, horses, serpents, cows and owls. In her three-headed form, she is often depicted with one or more animal heads.

This goddess is also associated with medicinal and poisonous plants, and the arts of using them. These plants include aconite (aka monkshood and wolfsbane), belladonna (aka nightshade) , dittany, and mandrake. Yew, Cyprus and garlic are also sacred to this Goddess. Yew in particular was used in Ancient Greek death rites and during sacrifices to the goddess.

Hecate in the Ancient World

This is one of the most confusing Goddesses in the Greek Pantheon. Depending on the region and historical period that one looks at, she is a virgin goddess, a crone, a young woman, a three-bodied Goddess, or a being with three different heads. She is associated with magic, witches, ghosts, crossroads, childbirth, nurturing the young, gates, walls, doorways, lunar lore, torches and dogs.

This Goddess’ origins are as varied as her purpose. In some cases she was a Titan, in others, a child of Olympians. Most who study such things believe that she was the patron Goddess of a smaller culture that was conquered or absorbed by the Greeks. This is demonstrated in the way this Goddess was incorporated into major myths of the time.

Her Roman name, Trivia, means “Three (Tri) Ways (Via)”, and has little to nothing to do with the modern English word “trivia”. Small statues of her were placed at crossroads and at the entrances to private homes and cities. Statutes at crossroads often depicted her Triple Goddess, while those at entrances were usually of a woman carrying two torches.

Final Note

The worship of Hecate often leads to difficult choices that are not often accepted by society. She is a Goddess of rebirth, and those who she chooses become stronger and more comfortable with themselves and their own choices. Many people first come to her seeking some form of vengeance, but learn that justice and their own strength is more important.

 

Source:

Author: Psychic Wolf

Website: Pagan Growth

 

 

 

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Deity of the Day for July 6th is Isis, The Egyptian Goddess

Deity of the Day

Isis

The Egyptian Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Isis had numerous areas of influence. As her cult grew in popularity she absorbed the roles and titles of many earlier Goddesses including: Nekhebet, Bast, Hathor, Serket and Mut.

Her main roles are Mother and fertility Goddess and Goddess of magic and Healing.

The titles: Great Goddess, The Divine One and The One Who is All are a testament to the power and appeal of this Egyptian Goddess who had temples dedicated to her as far away as Britain.

She was described as the Goddess of Magic, Great Lady of Magic and Lady of the Words of Power. This was in recognition of her magical gifts and understanding of power of magical words. The ambitious Isis mastered these abilities after she poisoned Ra and offered to heal him in exchange for her secret name. By sharing this secret all Ra’s personal power and knowledge was transferred to Isis.

Together with Osiris she ruled the Gods until he was killed by Set, her jealous brother.

Unable to accept his death she used her magic and healing to bring Osiris back to life and he fathered her child Horus.

Set found out and destroyed Osiris again, Isis used magic once again and granted Osiris immortality.

The Goddess ran away and brought up Horus in secret. She is revered as an excellent mother and there are several works of art that depict her with her son on her lap. She also became a fertility and Earth Goddess as shown by the following titles: Lady of Green Crops, Mother of the Gods, Mother of the Universe, Queen of the Earth. In this role she became the protector and patron of woman and children.

This Goddess was associated with all of the elements: earth as a fertility Goddess, air through her association with wind especially the North wind, fire as a solar Deity she is described as Maker of the Sunrise and the Brilliant One in the Sky and lastly water as she was linked to the flooding of the Nile.

She had so many different areas of influence that she earnt the title of Lady of Ten Thousand Names.

Origins and Genealogy: She was the daughter of Nut and Geb, her siblings included Osiris whom she married and Set and Nephthys. Her only child was Horus.

Strengths: Ambitious and a loyal wife and mother.

Weaknesses: She wanted to win and maintain her power at any cost.

Isis’s Symbolism

Her name means female of the throne and she was often illustrated with a headdress showing an empty throne suggestive of both her husbands’ absence and that she was the seat of the Pharaoh’s power.

Alternatively she is shown with a solar disk and horns or even with a cow’s head.

In her funerary role she was often given wings and carried the Ankh symbolizing immortality.

Sacred Animal: The cow, snake and scorpion.

Sacred Birds: Hawks, swallows, doves and vultures.

Isis’s Archetpes

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

Isis is an archetypal Mother figure, a good mother to her son Isis, she is also said to have nursed the Egyptian Pharaoh and to have been a fertility Goddess for the Earth and her Followers.

The Witch

Uses knowledge of the universal laws of nature, the conscious mind and esoteric powers to manifest their desires.

The shadow Witch uses their gifts to increase their own power.

Isis is guilty of this when she uses magic to poison Ra and tricks him into giving her all his power and knowledge

 

How To Work With These Archetypes

The Mother: You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

The Witch: The Witch maybe one of your Archetypes can if you have the gift of understanding how to transform situations, influence people, and make your visions and dreams a reality.

The Shadow Witch reminds you not to use these abilities to gain power over others as this is not magic but sorcery.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

 

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Deity of the Day for July 4th – Rhea, The Greek Goddess

Deity of the Day

Rhea

The Greek Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Rhea was an Earth Goddess, responsible for the fertility of the soil, women and motherhood. She took over most of these responsibilities from her mother Gaia/Gaea.

Her name means “flow” and “ease” relating to her role of the Great Mother where the flow refers to menstrual blood. It also links her to the tides and the moon.

She is closely identified with the Anatolian Great Mother Goddess, Cybele. They shared similar roles and symbolism.

Together with Cronus she ruled over the Titans. Her position as Queen was succeeded by Hera when the Titans were defeated by the Olympians.

This ancient deity had priest’s were called Curetes.

Origins and Genealogy: Her parents were Gaia and Uranus.

This Goddess had many brothers and sisters including the Titans: Cronus, Hyperion, Lapetus, Theia, Themis Mnemosyne, Pheobe and Tethys.

She married her brother Cronus and had six children by him: Demeter, Hera, Hestia, Hades Poseidon and Zeus.

Rhea was horrified when Cronus swallowed each of them whole at birth as he feared the fulfillment of a prophecy that predicted he would be overthrown by one of his children.

When Zeus was born she tricked her husband into swallowing a stone wrapped up in his swaddling clothes. Zeus was then hidden and taken to Crete.

Later, when Cronus was dethroned and imprisoned she had an affair with Olympus and gave birth to two more children, Alce and Midas.

Crete became the main centre of this Mother Goddesses cult.

Strengths: A Mother figure, generally gentle but becomes fearsome when crossed.

Weaknesses: She deserts her husbands but who can blame her?

Rhea’s Symbolism

Rhea is usually shown as a matronly woman with a turret crown, standing between two lions or on a chariot pulled by lions.

The moon is another one of her symbols representing her role as a fertility Goddess.

Other symbols include a lighted torch, brass drums and a double ax.

Sacred Animal: Lions,

Sacred Plants: Fruit bearing trees, pine and the oak.

Sacred Day: Saturday was devoted to this Goddess.

Her close ties with Cybele, link this Goddess to Spring Festivals held to honour the Great Mother. This celebration is the origin of Mothering Sunday.

Rhea’s Archetype

The Mother:

The Mother Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before her self is the essense of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

Rhea is a Mother Goddess caring for the earth. When it comes to the care of her own children her credentials as a loving mother are less convincing. She is unable to stand up to cruel husband and only saves them through trickery and by sending Zeus to be cared for in Crete.

How to Work with this Archetype

The Mother:

You do not need to be a biological mother to have this Archetype. The Mother Archetype refers to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to any living thing including plants and animals.

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow mother if you smother your children and are over protective. You need to encourage independence, allowing children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
The Goddess-Guide.com

 

 

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Deity of the Day for July 3rd – Minerva, Goddess of wisdom and crafts

Deity of the Day

Minerva

 

Areas of Influence: Minerva was the Goddess of wisdom and crafts.

Only in Rome was she worshipped as the Goddess of war.

This Goddess represented the application of intellect to everyday tasks. As the Goddess of wisdom she was accredited with inventing spinning, weaving, numbers and music.

She is also the patron of Goddess of medicine.

Ovid described her as the “Goddess of a thousand works.”

Origins and Genealogy: The name of this Goddess is said to be of Etruscan origin.

Her parents were Jupiter and Métis. Elements of the myths surrounding her birth however have been poached from Greek Goddess Athena, as she too is born fully grown, from her father’s head.

She was considered third among the Gods and Goddesses and was part of the Capitolian triad alongside Juna and Jupiter.

Strengths: Wisdom, creativity and strength.

Weaknesses: Out of touch with emotions.

Minerva’s Symbolism

The Roman Goddess of wisdom is depicted in full battle dress with a coat of mail, a helmet and a spear.

Sacred Animal/Insect: Owl and the spider.

Sacred Plants: Her sacred plants were the olive, mulberry and alder trees.

Festivals: The main festival celebrating this Goddess took place March 19th – 23rd.

A smaller festival occurred later in the year on the 13th of June.

Greek Equivalent: Athena

Minerva’s Archetypes

The Teacher/ Inventor:

The Teacher and Inventor communicates knowledge, experience and wisdom.

In it’s shadow aspect, the Teacher may manipulate and mislead their students by indoctrinating them with negative beliefs and destructive behaviours.

This is Minerva’s primary Archetype as she teaches humans how to spin and weave. She is also accredited in Roman mythology for inventing numbers and medicine.

The Warrior:

Archetype represents physical strength, and the ability to protect and fight for your rights and those of others.

The shadow side of the Warrior reflects the need to win at all costs, abandoning ethical principles to prove your supremacy.

Although Roman mythology borrows heavily from it’s Greek counterparts, it is only in Rome that Minerva is worshipped as the Goddess of war, despite always being depicted in full battle dress. This is why I have ranked this Archetype as only of secondary importance for this Goddess.

 

How To Work With These Archetypes

The Teacher/Inventor:

This Archetype may suggest a love of passing on wisdom and learning to others.

This Goddess wise counsel can also be called upon to help you see a way through any present difficulties or to help you to master a new skill.

The shadow aspect of this stereo type is also a reminder that whenever we find ourselves in a teaching or mentoring role we must aim to be a positive role model, encouraging others to reach their full potential.

The Warrior:

If you are drawn to work with this Goddess you may require her Warrior spirit to help you to stand up for your rights and set firm personal boundaries. This Goddess can be a great stereotype to work with if you want to take control in your life, and wish to no longer play the role of the victim.

You may also wish to call upon this Goddess to champion the cause of others.

Conversely this Goddess may appeal to you if you have a very strong sense of self and are proud of the victories you have achieved. The shadow side may be asking you to reflect honestly on the cost of these victories. Have they been at the expense of others or your principals?

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for June 28th is The Morrighan

Deity of the Day

The Morrighan

 

Areas of Influence: The Goddess Morrigan represented the circle of life, she was associated with both birth and death.

Her name means great queen or phantom queen. It is spelt in several different ways including Morrigu, Morgane, Morrighan and Morgan le Fay in the Arthurian legends.

She is one of the triple Goddesses, her different aspects are represented by Anu (the fertility maiden), Badh (the boiling mother cauldron) and either Macha (the death crone) or Nemain.

As the battle Goddess she appeared on the battlefield in the form of a crow and returned later to feed on the dead.

Morrigan is also a water Goddess, ruling over rivers and lakes. In one myth she appears as an old washer woman at the ford and offering her love to Cu Chulainne. He failed to recognize Morrigan on this occasion and on several others. Enraged she threated to hinder him in battle, when he is killed as a result of this she appears on his shoulder as a crow.

This Goddess also grants monarchs the power of sovereignty.

Origins and Genealogy: I can find no mention of her parentage but in some myths she was said to be the consort of Dadga

Morrigan was also one of the Tuatha de Danann (The tribe of the Goddess Danu). She protected her people by blowing a fog over the land, the lack of visibility discouraged invading armies.

Strengths: Fearsome and strong.

Weaknesses: She is vindictive, killing the person she loves when he fails to recognize her.

Morrigan’s Symbolism

As a symbol of death the Goddess Morrigan is linked with the festival of Samhain.

Sacred Bird: Crows and ravens.

Sacred Plants: Mugwort, yew and willow.

 

Morrigan’s Archetype

The Shape-Shifter:

The Shape Shifter has the ability to change her physical appearance. They are also able to adapt easily to different environments by altering there behavior.

Shadow Shape shifter is fickle, lacking conviction and constantly reinventing themselves, like politicians trying to appeal to more people.

Morrigan is a bird Goddess who shape-shifts into the form of a hooded crow and a washer woman at the ford.

 

Source:
The Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for June 26th is Epona

Deity of the Day

Goddess Epona

 

Areas of Influence: Epona was the Celtic Horse Goddess whose worship spread to Britain and Rome from Western Europe.

The Roman cavalry had shrines dedicated to her. In fact she was so popular that a temple dedicated to her in Rome.

A Roman Festival to honor her was celebrated on 18th December.

Her name means “Divine mare” in Gaulish.

The mare was an ancient symbol of fertility, this has lead to suggestions that she was an early Mother Goddess figure, whose role was later reduced to protector of horses.

Her cornucopia and the basket of fruit she carried provide further support for her role as a fertility Goddess.

This Goddess is often liked to both Rhiannon in Wales and Macha in Ireland due to their shared association with Horses.

She is also linked to birds and dogs.

There are no surviving Gaullish myths dedicated to this Goddess.

She was the bestower of sovereignty in Celtic kingship rites.

The Celtic horse Goddess has been linked to the White Horse at Uffington and Lady Godiva.

Origins and Genealogy: There are no accounts of her parentage or suggestions that she married and had children.

Strengths: Protector.

Weaknesses: As the information about this Goddess comes mainly from archeological finds there is little information on this Goddess’s personality.

Epona’s Symbolism

She is depicted as a young Goddess, either sitting side saddle on a horse or feeding mares and foals food from a cornucopia or fruit basket. There are also several images showing her riding a horse and cart.

Sacred Animals: Horses, mules, donkeys, dogs and birds.

Sacred Plants: Garlands of roses were used to decorate her shrines.

Source:

The Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for June 24th is Bast

Deity of the Day

Bast

The Egyptian Cat Goddess

Areas of Influence: The Egyptian cat goddess Bast had numerous areas of influence that developed over time. In the early days she was the fierce lion headed Goddess of the lower Nile who protected the Pharaoh and the sun God Ra. This is why she has the title of Goddess of protection. In this role she became Goddess of the rising sun and holder of the Utchat, the all seeing eye of Horus. Statues of this Goddess would be placed in households to protect them from thieves.

In the Book of the Dead she is mentioned as destroying the bodies of the deceased, with the royal flame, if they failed the judgment hall of Maat.

Later she was depicted with the head of a domestic cat, representing her more nurturing aspects. Woman of the time would buy amulets of this Goddess illustated with different numbers of kittens, representing the number of children they wished to have. The links to fertility and childbirth were further strengthened by the Greeks. They likened this Goddess to Artemis and she also became associated with the moon and children.

As a cat Goddess she also protected houses from rats and snakes and so ensured the health of the occupants.

The Goddess was linked to the music and dance due to the special rattle that she carried known as the Sistrum. The rattles were used to celebrate her festivals.

She was connected with perfumes as she shares a hieroglyph with that which represented the bas jar. These were ceramic vessels used to hold expensive perfumes. Her son was also linked to perfumery.

A Patron Goddess of fire fighters due to the Eygptian belief that if a cat ran through a burning household she would draw the flames out behind her.

Her cult was centered in Bubastis, when her temple was excavated they found the mummified remains of over 300 000 cats. She was worshipped throughout the lower Nile.

She was also known by several different names including Bastet, Basthet, Ubasti and Pasht. The name Pasht is the root of our word passion, linking this Goddess to physical pleasure.

Origins and Genealogy: In common with many Egyptian Goddesses her lineage is complicated. She was the daughter of Ra and is often said to be the sister of Sekhmet.

Linked with many of the Egyptian Gods and Goddesses she bore a son called Nefertem. Mut later absorbed her identity together with that of Wadjet to become Mut-Wadjet-Bast before also taking over the identities of Sekhmet and Nekhebet.

Strengths: Protector, sensual and caring mother figure.

Weaknesses: Chameleon like and fierce when threatened.

Bast’s Symbolism

Presented as a lion headed or Cat headed woman often carrying an ankh or papyrus wand. She is associated with the all seeing eye (the utchat) and a rattle (the sistrum).

Sacred Animals: Lions and domestic cats.

Sacred Plants: Catnip.

Festivals: According to the Herodotus her festivals were licentious and popular affairs also celebrated with music, dancing, drinking. No wonder Bast is considered the Goddess of Pleasure.

Bast’s Archetypes

The Warrior:

Represents physical strength, and the ability to protect and fight for your rights and those of of others.

Whilst the shadow side of the Warrior reflects the need to win at all costs, abandoning ethical principals to prove your supremacy.

Bast is a Warrior protecting her father and the Pharoh. As a mother cat figure she is fierce in the protection of her young.

The Lover:

Represents passion and selfless devotion to another person. It also extends to the things that make our hearts sing, like music art or nature.

The shadow aspect is obsessive passion that completely takes over and negatively impacts on your health and self esteem.

Bast was the Lover of many Gods and Goddesses. She is also associated the pleasures of music, dancing and perfumery.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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