Posts Tagged With: Goddess

Deity of the Day for September 16th is Goddess Pomona

Deity of the Day

Goddess Pomona

Areas of Influence: Pomona was one of the Numina, the Roman guardian spirits who watched over people, homes and special places. She protected fruiting trees and gardens.

She is an agricultural Goddess , responsible for the care and cultivation of fruit trees and orchards. Her name is actually derived from the Latin word pomun, meaning fruit. Her dedication to her work left her little time for love. She turned down the offers of marriage from Silvanus and Picus but was eventually tricked into marriage by Vertumnus. This deity was served by high priests known as Flamen Pomonalis in a sacred grove known as the Pomonal.

 

Origins and Genealogy: I can find no references to her parents, siblings and children.

Strengths: A nurturer, dedicated to her job.  As a fertility Goddess she represented abundance.

Weaknesses: So busy looking after her trees that she has little time for herself.

Symbolism: A popular figure in art she is shown as a beautiful Goddess carrying a knife to prune with and a platter of fruit or a cornucopia.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples.

Festival: A feast was held annually on the November 1st when apples, nuts and grapes were consumed to celebrate the harvest.

Unlike many of the Roman Goddesses she has no specific Greek equivalent.

Pomona’s Archetype

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

As Goddess of the harvest she represents the Mother Archetype as she nurtures the fruits, trees and the plants in the garden.

How to Work With This Archetype

The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 10th is The Goddess Lakshmi

Deity of the Day

 The Goddess Lakshmi

 

Lakshmi is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, both material and spiritual. The word ”Lakshmi” is derived from the Sanskrit word Laksme, meaning “goal.” Lakshmi, therefore, represents the goal of life, which includes worldly as well as spiritual prosperity. In Hindu mythology, Goddess Lakshmi, also called Shri, is the divine spouse of Lord Vishnu and provides Him with wealth for the maintenance and preservation of the creation.

In Her images and pictures, Lakshmi is depicted in a female form with four arms and four hands. She wears red clothes with a golden lining and is standing on a lotus. She has golden coins and lotuses in her hands. Two elephants (some pictures show four) are shown next to the Goddess. This symbolism conveys the following spiritual theme:

  • The four arms represent the four directions in space and thus symbolize omnipresence and omnipotence of the Goddess. The red color syinbolizes activity. The golden lining (embroidery) on Her red dress denotes prosperity. The idea conveyed here is that the Goddess is always busy distributing wealth and prosperity to the devotees. The lotus seat, which Lakshmi is standing upon, signifies that while living in this world, one should enjoy its wealth, but not become obsessed with it. Such a living is analogous to a lotus that grows in water but is not wetted by water.
  • The four hands represent the four ends of human life: dharma (righteousness), kama (genuine desires), artha (wealth), and moksha (liberation from birth and death). The front hands represent the activity in the physical world and the back hands indicate the spiritual activities that lead to spiritual perfection.
  • Since the right side of the body symbolizes activity, a lotus in the back right hand conveys the idea that one must perform all duties in the world in accordance with dharma. This leads to moksha (liberation), which is symbolized by a lotus in the back left hand of Lakshmi. The golden coins falling on the ground from the front left hand of Lakshmi illustrate that She provides wealth and prosperity to Her devotees. Her front right hand is shown bestowing blessings upon the devotees.
  • The two elephants standing next to the Goddess symbolize the name and fame associated with worldly wealth. The idea conveyed here is that a true devotee should not earn wealth merely to acquire name and fame or only to satisfy his own material desires, but should share it with others in order to bring happiness to others in addition to himself.
  • Some pictures show four elephants spraying water from golden vessels onto Goddess Lakshmi. The four elephants represent the four ends of human life as discussed above. The spraying of water denotes activity. The golden vessels denote wisdom and purity. The four elephants spraying water from the golden vessels on the Goddess illustrate the theme that continuous self-effort, in accordance with one’s dharma and governed by wisdom and purity, leads to both material and spiritual prosperity.

Goddess Lakshmi is regularly worshipped in home shrines and temples by Her devotees. A special worship is offered to Her annually on the auspicious day of Diwali, with religious rituals and colorful ceremonies specifically devoted to Her. 

- Bansi Pandit

Website: Hindu Deities

 

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 5th is The Goddess Pomona

Deity of the Day

Pomona

Areas of Influence: Pomona was one of the Numina, the Roman guardian spirits who watched over people, homes and special places. She protected fruiting trees and gardens.

She is an agricultural Goddess , responsible for the care and cultivation of fruit trees and orchards. Her name is actually derived from the Latin word pomun, meaning fruit. Her dedication to her work left her little time for love. She turned down the offers of marriage from Silvanus and Picus but was eventually tricked into marriage by Vertumnus. This deity was served by high priests known as Flamen Pomonalis in a sacred grove known as the Pomonal.

 

Origins and Genealogy: I can find no references to her parents, siblings and children.

Strengths: A nurturer, dedicated to her job.  As a fertility Goddess she represented abundance.

Weaknesses: So busy looking after her trees that she has little time for herself.

Symbolism: A popular figure in art she is shown as a beautiful Goddess carrying a knife to prune with and a platter of fruit or a cornucopia.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples.

Festival: A feast was held annually on the November 1st when apples, nuts and grapes were consumed to celebrate the harvest.

Unlike many of the Roman Goddesses she has no specific Greek equivalent.

Pomona’s Archetype

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

As Goddess of the harvest she represents the Mother Archetype as she nurtures the fruits, trees and the plants in the garden.

How to Work With This Archetype

The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

 

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 4th is Fortuna

Deity of the Day

Fortuna

Fortuna is the Roman Goddess of Luck, Fate, and Fortune, as Her name implies. She was a very popular Goddess, and was worshipped under many epithets depending on the type of luck one wished to invoke or the circumstances in play. She had many temples in Rome itself, as well as having important cult-centers in Antium (the modern Anzio), a city on the west coast of Italy about 30 miles south of Rome, and Praeneste (modern Palestrina), about 20 miles south-east of Rome, both of which were cities of Latium, the land of the Latini tribes. Her many temples in Rome, and the various aspects of Her worship are a reflection of the manners in which She was honored: from personal Goddess, overseeing the fate of the individual mother, young man, or soldier, to a Goddess of the State, ensuring the fortune of the populace, the luck of the Emperor, or the glorious fate of the entire Roman Empire.

Fortuna was usually depicted holding in one hand a cornucopia, or a horn of plenty, from which all good things flowed in abundance, representing Her ability to bestow prosperity; in the other She generally has a ship’s rudder, to indicate that She is the one who controls how lives and fates are steered. She could also be shown enthroned, with the same attributes of rudder and cornucopia, but with a small wheel built into the chair, representing the cycles of fate and the ups and downs of fortune. Sometimes She is blind, as an acknowledgment that good luck does not always come to those who seem to most deserve it; at other times She is described as having wings, much like many Etruscan Goddesses—and indeed She was equated with the old Etruscan Fate Goddess Nortia, who was often shown winged.

The name Fortuna finds its root in the Latin fero, meaning “to bring, win, receive, or get”. She may have originally been a Goddess of Fertility, Who brought prosperity and success in the form of abundant harvests and offspring. Her worship in Rome traditionally goes back to the time of Ancus Martius, the 4th King of Rome, who is said to have reigned from 640-616 BCE. According to the propaganda of the time (and the Romans invented an awful lot of it to make it seem that their city had always been destined for greatness, and wasn’t just some upstart town founded by a bunch of sheep herders on some hills surrounded by malaria-infested swampland, which it was), when Fortuna first came to Rome, She immediately threw off Her shoes and discarded Her wings, announcing that She’d found Her true home and intended to never leave it.

Alternatively, Fortuna’s name may derive from that of the Etruscan Goddess Veltha or Voltumna, whose name encompasses ideas of turning and the alternating seasons. Voltumna in turn may be related to the Roman Goddess Volumna, Who watched over and protected children; and both of these themes are found with Fortuna, who was often depicted with a wheel, and who was said to predict the fates of children at their births. As a Goddess of Fate Fortuna naturally had the power to foretell the future; and under Her aspect of Fortuna Primigenia in Praeneste She had an oracle, in which tablets inscribed with messages were chosen from a jar. She also had an oracular shrine at Her cult-center in Antium.

Fortuna had a very old temple in Rome on a hill between the Forum Romanum (the Roman Forum) and the Forum Boarium (supposedly the old cattle-market), near to the temple of Mater Matuta. Both temples had the same dedication day, the 10th of June, and each had a horseshoe-shaped altar before it of the earliest type. Fortuna’s temple had a very old statue of gilded wood inside, also of an archaic type; and the altar and statue indicate that Her worship dates at least to the earliest days of Rome, if She is not an earlier Goddess of the Latins.

The Emperor Trajan (97-117 CE) dedicated a temple to Fortuna, at which offerings were made to the Goddess on the 1st day of January, at the start of the New Year, probably to ensure good luck and success for the coming year. This temple was dedicated to Fortuna in all of Her aspects.

With Greek influence, Fortuna was equated to Tykhe, their Goddess of Luck and Fortune. Under the title Dame Fortune, Fortuna never lost Her power as an allegorical figure—She makes an appearance on card 10 of the Tarot Major Arcana, the Wheel of Fortune, and She is still to some extent honored today, for She features in gamblers’ prayers to “Lady Luck”.

She is associated with the Goddess Felicitas, the personification of happiness, and Spes, the Goddess of Hope.

Source:

Obscure Goddess Online

 

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Call of Justice to the Dark Goddess

 

Call of Justice to the Dark Goddess

Items needed:
* blessing oil with drop of your blood added, altar cover with pentacle drawn with your blessing/blood

*sage smudge stick

*red candle


Set up and smudge altar to the right of Goddess altar. Always work this spell inside of your scared circle as altar of self. Place red candle as representation of self in the center of pentagram.


I call on you, the Dark Mothers of the Night! Hear me and come to me. You who are Hecate, Crone of Magick; you who are Persephone, raped and despoiled; you who are Kali-Ma, the Mother of Destruction… hear me. Erinyes, black maidens of vengeance. Adsagsona, she who seeks out, I call to thee.
The violation against me cries out. I have been __ by one who escapes justice. Dark Mothers, I invoke you, turn your eyes to this abuser and bring __ to justice. Let __not hide from your eyes, let __ be exposed for all to see and let ___wrongful deeds be known to all. I ask, Dark Mother, that you take ___ into your realm and show no mercy, as ____has shown no shame.
Persephone, you have undergone pain and grown strong. I ask that you protect me in your arms and be the Magick Mirror that reflects ____ violation back. Give me the strength and inner will to overcome the injustice and negativity that is directed towards me.
Dark Mothers I ask that you act, according to the law of three or your own wills as you see fit.


I am _____. I am a priestess of my Goddess. This is my bidding and these are my words. May this spell not reverse, or place upon me any curse. So mote it be.

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Deity of the Day for Aug. 25th – The Fates

Deity of the Day

 

The Fates

 

The Fates were three female deities who shaped people’s lives. In particular, they determined how long a man or woman would live. Although a number of cultures held the notion of three goddesses who influenced human destiny, the Fates were most closely identified with Greek mythology.

The Greek image of the Fates developed over time. The poet Homer * , credited with composing the Iliad and the Odyssey, spoke of Fate as a single force, perhaps simply the will of the gods. Another poet, Hesiod * , portrayed the Fates as three old women. They were called the Keres, which means “those who cut off,” or the Moirai, “those who allot.” They may have originated as goddesses who were present at the birth of each child to determine the course of the child’s future life.

deity god or goddess destiny future or fate of an individual or thing

allot to assign a portion or share

The parentage of the Fates is something of a mystery. Hesiod described them as daughters of Nyx, or night, but he also said that they were the children of Zeus, the chief of the gods, and Themis, the goddess of justice. The Fates had power over Zeus and the gods, and many ancient authors, including the Roman poet Virgil * , stressed that even the king of the gods had to accept the decisions of the Fates. Occasionally, however, fate could be manipulated. One myth says that Apollo * tricked the Fates into letting his friend Admetus live beyond his assigned lifetime. Apollo got the Fates drunk, and they agreed to accept the death of a substitute in place of Admetus.

Hesiod called the Fates Clotho (“the spinner”), Lachesis (“the allotter”), and Atropos (“the unavoidable”). In time, the name Clotho, with its reference to spinning thread, became the basis for images of the three Fates as controlling the thread of each person’s life. Clotho spun the thread, Lachesis measured it out, and Átropos cut it with a pair of shears to end the life span. Literary and artistic works often portray the Fates performing these tasks.

manipulate to influence or control in a clever or underhanded way

The Romans called the Fates Parcae, “those who bring forth the child.” Their names were Nona, Decuma, and Morta. Nona and Decuma were originally goddesses of childbirth, but the Romans adopted the Greek concept of the three weavers of Fate and in Greek mythology, the Fates were three goddesses who shaped people’s lives. They determined how long a man or woman would live.

added a third goddess to complete the triad. In addition, they sometimes referred to fate or destiny as a single goddess known as Fortuna.

triad group of three

A triad of goddesses linked with human destiny appears in various forms in mythology In addition to the Moirai, the Greeks recognized a triad of goddesses called the Horae, who were associated with the goddess Aphrodite

 

* . Their names were Eunomia (Order), Dike (Destiny), and Irene (Peace.) The Norse * called their three Fates the Norns: Urth, the past; Verthandi, the present; and Skuld, the future. Sometimes the Norns were referred to as the Weird Sisters, from the Norse word wyrd, meaning “fate.” The Celts * had a triad of war goddesses, collectively known as the Morrigan, who determined the fate of soldiers in battle. The image of a triple goddess may be linked to very ancient worship of a moon goddess in three forms: a maiden (the new moon), a mature woman (the full moon), and a crone (the old moon).
Source:

Myths Encyclopedia

 

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“GOOD MORNING WOTC!” What A Beautiful Tuesday The Goddess Has Given Us!

See us, 0 Goddess

Wise and warm

We am your children

And we search for answers

Our visions are at times clouded

And so we ask for clarity during

These times of cloudiness and cluttered minds

Our hearts is uncertain

And so we ask for clarification

Help me, 0 Goddess

To find our paths

And reveal our true selves.

So Mote It Be

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Deity of the Day for July 14th is Hecate, Goddess Of Witchcraft

Deity of the Day

Hecate

Goddess of Witchcraft

 

Hecate (or Hekate) is the Goddess of Witchcraft and of Justice. She is also a Goddess of the Underworld, Secrets and Wisdom. Hers is the power of knowing. She is often seen as a dark force, but she is a protector of women and those who seek justice. Her justice is like that of the hounds that accompany her: simple, direct, swift and uncompromising.

This Goddess’ quest for pure justice, combined with her witchcraft and secret knowledge, can be seen as harsh by many modern cultures. As a result, this type of justice is sometimes seen by many people as vengeance. However, she is not interested in simple vengeance; justice is a much in raising up the just as it is in bringing down the unjust.

The Goddess is most often seen depicted with dogs. There is some debate about the meaning of this, but it is thought to be either a symbol of birth or of death. She is a Goddess of both. She is the Goddess of the Crossroads – not only in this world, but between this world and the next. Although most often associated with dogs, she is also associated with frogs, horses, serpents, cows and owls. In her three-headed form, she is often depicted with one or more animal heads.

This goddess is also associated with medicinal and poisonous plants, and the arts of using them. These plants include aconite (aka monkshood and wolfsbane), belladonna (aka nightshade) , dittany, and mandrake. Yew, Cyprus and garlic are also sacred to this Goddess. Yew in particular was used in Ancient Greek death rites and during sacrifices to the goddess.

Hecate in the Ancient World

This is one of the most confusing Goddesses in the Greek Pantheon. Depending on the region and historical period that one looks at, she is a virgin goddess, a crone, a young woman, a three-bodied Goddess, or a being with three different heads. She is associated with magic, witches, ghosts, crossroads, childbirth, nurturing the young, gates, walls, doorways, lunar lore, torches and dogs.

This Goddess’ origins are as varied as her purpose. In some cases she was a Titan, in others, a child of Olympians. Most who study such things believe that she was the patron Goddess of a smaller culture that was conquered or absorbed by the Greeks. This is demonstrated in the way this Goddess was incorporated into major myths of the time.

Her Roman name, Trivia, means “Three (Tri) Ways (Via)”, and has little to nothing to do with the modern English word “trivia”. Small statues of her were placed at crossroads and at the entrances to private homes and cities. Statutes at crossroads often depicted her Triple Goddess, while those at entrances were usually of a woman carrying two torches.

Final Note

The worship of Hecate often leads to difficult choices that are not often accepted by society. She is a Goddess of rebirth, and those who she chooses become stronger and more comfortable with themselves and their own choices. Many people first come to her seeking some form of vengeance, but learn that justice and their own strength is more important.

 

Source:

Author: Psychic Wolf

Website: Pagan Growth

 

 

 

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