Posts Tagged With: Essential oil

Properties and Uses of Herb (S Thru Y)

Properties and Uses of Herb

(S Thru Y)

SANDALWOOD – Santalum album (Santalaceae) ,br>Native to eastern India, sandalwood is cultivated in South-East Asia for the extraction of wood and essential oil. Sandalwood’s aroma as been highly esteemed in China and India for thousands of year. The heartwood is most often used in perfumery, but it has also been taken as a remedy in China since around AD 500. Sandalwood and its essential oil are used for their antiseptic properties in treating genito-urinary conditions such as cystitis and gonorrhea. In India, a paste of the wood is used to soothe rashes and itchy skin. In China, sandalwood is held to be useful for chest and abdominal pain.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, aromatic.

SARSAPARILLA – Smilax spp. (Liliaceae)
Sarsaparilla is found in the tropical forest of the world, especially in Mexico, Peru and Brazil. There are more than 200 known species. Brought from the New World to Spain in 1563, sarsaparilla was heralded as a cure for syphilis. In Mexico, the herb has traditionally been used to treat a variety of skin problems. Sarsaparilla is anti-inflammatory and cleansing, and can bring relief to skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis and general itchiness, and help treat rheumatism, rheumatoid, arthritis and gout. Sarsaparilla also has a progesterogenic action, making it beneficial in pre-menstrual problems, and menopausal conditions such as debility and depression. In Mexico the root is still frequently consumed for its reputed tonic and aphrodisiac properties. Native Amazonian peoples take sarsaparilla to improve virility and to treat menopausal problems.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Diuretic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic.

SCOTS PINE – Pinus sylvestris (Pinaceae)
Native to the mountainous regions of Europe and north and west Asia. Its oil, extracted from the leaves, is added to disinfectants and other preparations. Scots pine leaves, taken internally, have a mildly antiseptic effect within the chest, and may also be used for arthritic and rheumatic problems. Essential oil from the leaves may be taken for asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory infections, and for digestive disorders such as wind. Scots pine branches and stems yield a thick resin, which is also antiseptic within the respiratory tract. The seeds yield an essential oil with diuretic and respiratory-stimulant properties.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, diuretic and anti-rheumatic.

SESAME – Sesamum indicum (Pedaliaceae)
Native to Africa, sesame is now cultivated in many tropical and sub-tropical areas of the world. In ancient Egypt, the seeds were eaten and also pressed to yield oil, which was burned in lamps and used to make ointments. Sesame is used in China to redress afflictions of the liver and kidneys. The seeds are prescribed for problems such as dizziness, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and blurred vision. Owing to their lubricating effect within the digestive tract, the seeds are also considered a remedy for constipation. Sesame seed oil benefits the skin and is used as a base for cosmetics. A decoction of the root is used in various traditions to treat coughs and asthma.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Digestive, aromatic, antispasmodic.

ST JOHN’S WORT – Hypericum perforatum (Guttiferae)
The plant is native to Europe but is widely cultivated elsewhere. St. John’s wort flowers at the time of the summer solstice, and in medieval Europe it was considered to have powerful magical properties that enabled it to repel evil. The most well-known action of St. John’s wort is in repairing nerve damage and reducing pain and inflammation. It is taken to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps, sciatica and arthritis. Th oils is applied to inflammations, sprains, bruises and varicose veins. St. John’s wort is also used to treat circulation problems, bronchitis and gout.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antidepressant, antispasmodic, astringent, sedative, relieves pain, anti-viral.

TARRAGON – Artemisia dracunculus (Compositae)
Tarragon is probably native of southern Europe or the steppes of Asia. Historians believe that tarragon reached Europe brought into Spain by invading Mongols. Tarragon is widely used as a herb in cooking. In French, it is sometimes known as herbe au dragon, because of its reputed ability to cure serpent bites. While tarragon stimulates the digestion, it is reputed to be a mild sedative and has been taken to aid sleep. With its mild menstruation-inducing properties, it is taken if periods are delayed. The root has traditionally been applied to aching teeth.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Anti-inflammatory, digestive.

TEA TREE – Malaleuca alternifolia (Myrtaceae)
Tea tree is native to Australia and is now cultivated extensively. Tea tree, and in particular its essential oil, is one of the most important natural antiseptics. Useful for stings, burns, wounds and skin infections of all kinds, the herb merits a place in every medicine chest. Its therapeutic properties were first researched during the 1920s and it is now widely used in Europe and the US, as well as in Australia.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, antibacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral.

THYME – Thymus vulgaris (Labiatae)
Thyme occurs in the west Mediterranean to the southwest Italy. The herb was known to the Sumerians, used by the Egyptians, Greeks and Romans. Thyme was praised by the herbalist Nicholas Culpeper (1616-1654) as “a notable strengthener of the lungs”. Its main medicinal application is in treating coughs and clearing congestion. Many current formulas for mouth washes and vapor rubs contain thymol, one of the constituents found in thyme. It also improves digestion, destroys intestinal parasites and is an excellent antiseptic and tonic.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, tonic, relieves muscle spasm, expectorant.

TURMERIC – Curcuma longa syn. C. domestica (Zingiberaceae)
Turmeric is native to India and southern Asia where it is extensively cultivated. Best known for its bright yellow color and spicy taste to lovers of Indian food, its medicinal value is not so well known. However, recent research has confirmed the effects traditionally associated in ancient practices in the treatment of digestive and liver problems. The herb has also been shown to inhibit blood-clotting, relieve inflammatory conditions and help lower cholesterol levels.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Stimulates secretion of bile, anti-inflammatory, eases stomach pain, antioxidant, antibacterial.

VALERIAN – Valeriana officinalis (Valerianaceae)
Valerian is native to Europe and western Asia. The medicinal properties of valerian were well known at least since Roman times. Valerian root is a general tranquilizer used for relieving nervous tension, insomnia and headaches. Valerian decreases muscular spasm, being useful in cases of nervous digestion, bowel syndrome, stomach and menstrual cramps. Valerian helps relieve stress and has become an increasingly popular remedy in recent decades. It is a safe, non-addictive relaxant that reduces nervous tension and anxiety and promotes restful sleep.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Sedative, relaxant, relieves muscle spasm, relieves anxiety, lowers blood pressure.

VERBENA – Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae)
Native of Europe, verbena is extensively cultivated in other countries. Verbena has long been credited with magical properties and was used in ceremonies by the Romans, Druids of ancient Britain and Gaul. It is a traditional herbal medicine in both China and Europe. Verbena is used in mouth washes for infected gums and as a poultice for hemorrhoids. A tea has been used as a nerve tonic, to treat insomnia and to help digestion. D It has tonic, restorative properties, and is used to relieve stress and anxiety, and to improve digestive function.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Nervine, tonic, mild sedative, stimulates bile secretion, mild bitter.

WHITE WILLOW – Salix alba (Salicaceae)
White willow is native to Europe but is also found in North Africa and Asia. White willow is an excellent remedy for arthritic and rheumatic pain, affecting the joints like knees and hips. Famous as the original source of salicylic acid, first isolated in 1838 and synthetically produced in the laboratory in 1899, white willow and closely related species have been used for thousands of years in Europe, Africa, Asia and North America to relieve joint pain and manage fevers. The Greek physician Discorides in the 1st century AD, suggested taking “willow leaves, mashed with a little pepper and drunk with wine” to relieve lower back pain.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, reduces fever, anti-rheumatic, astringent.

WORMWOOD – Artemisia absinthium (Compositae)
Native to Europe, wormwood was called absintium by the Romans, what means “bitter”. Wormwood leave’s primary uses is to stimulate the gallbladder, help prevent and release stones, and to adjust digestive malfunctions. It also increases bile secretion and is useful in expelling intestinal worms. It is taken in small doses and sipped, the intensely bitter taste playing an important part in its therapeutic effect. In the past, wormwood was one of the main flavorings of vermouth (whose name derives from the German for wormwood).
HEALING PROPERTIES: Aromatic bitter, stimulates secretion of bile, anti-inflammatory, eliminates worms, eases stomach pains, mild antidepressant.

WILD THYME – Thymus serpyllum (Labiatae)
Thyme is native to the west Mediterranean to southwest Italy. Like its close relative thyme (Thymus vulgaris), wild thyme is strongly antiseptic and anti-fungal. It may be taken as an infusion or syrup to treat flu and colds, sore throats, coughs, whooping cough, chest infections, and bronchitis. Wild thyme has anti-catarrhal properties and helps clear a stuffy nose, sinusitis, ear congestion and related complaints. It has been used to expel thread worms and roundworms in children, and is used to settle wind and colic. Wild thyme’s antispasmodic action makes it useful and is used to settle wind and colic. Wild thyme is also used in herbal baths and pillows.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, anti-fungal, antispasmodic.

YARROW – Achillea millefolium (Compositae)
Yarrow is a native European plant, with a long history as a wound healer. In classical times, it was known as herba militaris, being used to staunch war wounds. It has long been taken as a strengthening bitter tonic and all kinds of bitter drinks have been made from it. Yarrow helps recovery from colds and flu and is beneficial for hay fever. It is also helpful for menstrual problems and circulatory disorders.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antispasmodic, astringent, bitter tonic, increases sweating, lowers blood pressure, reduces fever, mild diuretic and urinary antiseptic.

YLANG -YLANG – Canananga odorata syn. Canangium odoratum (Annonaceae)
Ylang-ylang is native to Indonesia and the Philippines. The flowers are a traditional adornment in the Far East. Their scent is thought to have aphrodisiac qualities. The flowers and essential oil are sedative and antiseptic. The oil has a soothing effect, and its main therapeutic uses are to slow an excessively fast heart rate and to lower blood pressure. With its reputation as an aphrodisiac, ylang-ylang may be helpful in treating impotence.
HEALING PROPERTIES: Antiseptic, aromatic, regulates blood pressure

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Herb of the Day for July 6th is Mint (various)

Herb of the Day

Mint (various)


Medicinal Uses: The infusion of the Mint herb has been used for diarrhea and as an
emmenagogue (it brings down the menses). It is great for colds and influenza,
especially when mixed with elder flower (this remedy will induce sweating). Stomach
flu is helped by a mint, elderflower, and yarrow combination in a standard infusion of
two teaspoons per cup steeped for twenty minutes and taken in quarter-cup doses.
Mint is helpful in stomach complaints, but a strong infusion will become a emetic. Mint
tea eases colic and depression. The menthol in peppermint soothes the lining of the
digestive tract an stimulates the production of bile, which is an essential digestive
fluid. It relieves earaches when the fresh juice of a few drops of the essential oil are
placed in the ear.
Mint tea with honey soothes a sore throat. A classic cold remedy that will unblock the sinuses is two drops of mint essential oil, two drop eucalyptus essential oil and the juice of half a lemon in a cup of hot water. The mix is first inhaled and then drunk when warm.  Nervous headaches can be relieved if you lie in a dark room with fresh peppermint leaves on the forehead.
A few drops of the oil in water, applied with a cloth, help burning and itching, heat prostration, and sunburn. Apply it directly to an itchy skin condition or sunburn. For heat prostration place the cool fomentation on the forehead and wrists. Peppermint oil is the most extensively used of all the volatile oils.
For insomnia try the following:
1 oz. Peppermint herb, cut fine, 1/2 oz. Rue herb, 1/2 oz. Wood Betony. Well mix and place a large tablespoonful in a tea cup, fill with boiling water, stir and cover for twenty minutes, strain and sweeten, and drink the warm infusion on going to bed. Peppermint is an excellent breath freshener. When using peppermint tea as a breath freshener, increase the effectiveness by adding a pinch of anise, caraway or cinnamon.
Wild Mint (Mentha sativa) is considered to have emetic, stimulant, and astringent qualities, and is used in diarrhea and as an emmenagogue. The infusion of 1 oz. of the dried herb to 1 pint of boiling water is taken in wineglass full, doses.
Rub pennyroyal on the skin as an insect repellent.

No more than two drops of the essential oils should be taken at any time, and no more that two cups a day of the above mixture. Larger doses can be toxic to the kidneys.
Never eat pennyroyal, as it is toxic.

Magickal Uses: Mint is used in the home as a protective herb. It belongs to the sphere of Venus and has long been used in healing potions and mixtures. Mint worn at the wrist assures that you will not be ill. Mint is used in money and prosperity spells. Bergamot mint is sometimes rubbed on money to cause it to return to its owner.
Fresh mint laid on the altar will call spirits to be present and ready to assist you in magick, especially healing spells. Added to incenses it cleanses the house or ritual area. Mint is masculine, and ruled by the planet Mercury or Venus. It is associated with the Element of Air.

Properties: Anti-inflammatory, stimulant, carminative, antispasmodic and antiseptic. The chief constituent of Spearmint oil is Carvone. There are also present Phellandrine, Limonene and dihydrocarveol acetate. Esters of acetic, butyric and caproic or caprylic acids.
The chief constituent of Peppermint oil is Menthol, but it also contains menthyl acetate and isovalerate, together with menthone, cineol, inactive pineneand limonene.

Growth: The common types of mint are peppermint, pennyroyal, crinkle-leafed spearmint, spearmint, and applemint. Mint is a perennial herb that is propagated by root division or rooting cuttings in water. The plant is invasive and should be grown in pots or in lengths of plastic pipe buried in the ground. It enjoys a damp location, shaded from strong afternoon sun, and rich soil.
Source:
Author: Crick

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Create a Spiritual Barrier (Voodoo)

Create a Spiritual Barrier

 

To make a spiritual barrier between you and evil influences, make spiritual protection magic oil that contains the following:

• Angelica essential oil

• Rosemary essential oil

• Bay leaves

• Piece of mandrake root

Add to a base of almond oil. Anoint entryways, windowsills, and doorknobs to your home and workplace to keep out negative influences.

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Erzulie Freda Floral Perfume Oil

Erzulie Freda Floral Perfume Oil

 

Use this oil to increase your personal magnetism, and to draw love and prosperity to you.

• 3/4 cup jojoba oil

• 1/2 teaspoon essential oil of rose

• 1/2 teaspoon essential oil of lavender

• 1 teaspoon essential oil of geranium

• 1/4 teaspoon essential oil of ylang-ylang

Mix together and store in a tightly sealed bottle, in a dark place. Wear as a perfume or anoint charms.

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Formulas or Measurements Commonly In Voodoo

Formulas or Measurements Commonly In Voodoo

 

Some of the following formulas will provide precise blending requirements, while others do not. This is because the way I make my oils is similar to the way I cook – like a Creole, with a little bit o’ dis and little bit o’ dat. Sometimes I want the strength of a particular herb or scent to be more or less depending on the work or purpose I have in mind and so I will adjust it accordingly. You can do this too, once you get comfortable with both the process of blending oils, as well as their properties.  In the meantime, here are some basic guidelines to go by when the precise measurements are not provided for a particular formula.

• Anointing Oil – Anointing Oils can be made using different concentrations of essential oils.  Add 60-75 drops of essential oil or essential oil blend to approximately 1 oz. of carrier oil.

• Perfume – Add up to 20 drops of essential oil to 1/3 ounce of carrier oil.  There are two types of carrier oils that work well for perfumes, jojoba oil and fractionated coconut oil.  These carrier oils have a long shelf life and are nearly odorless.

• Spray – Add 30-50 drops of an essential oil or essential oil blend to an 8 oz.  spray bottle.  Fill the remainder of the bottle with distilled water.  Most spray bottles of this size will be plastic; however, remember the oils will erode the plastic bottle in time.

• Bath Oil– Add 5-7 drops of essential oils or essential oil blend to one ounce of carrier oil.  Pour a small amount of the blend into a tub of running water.  Stir the water and oil together before getting in the tub.   Now, here are some recipes for a variety of oils and potions for use in your magickal works. Anointing oils may be used for general purpose prayer or other applications, except for the Holy Anointing Oil, which is reserved for consecration and blessing purposes only.

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WOTC Extra – Precautions When Working with Magickal Oils

 Precautions When Working with Magickal Oils

 

Precautions

Please note that it is always possible to have an allergic reaction to any oil or oil blend. A skin patch test should be conducted prior to using any essential oil that will have contact with the skin. This is to determine if you may be allergic or have a sensitization reaction to the oil.

1) Keep all essential oils out of the reach of children and pets.

2) Pregnant women and persons with health problems must consult doctor.

3) Essential oils should never be used undiluted on the skin.

4) Essential oils should not be taken internally.

5) Products made with natural ingredients may still cause allergic reactions with some individuals.   When using oils on skin, be aware of any reactions that seem to be happening, and take first aid measures immediately. Flush the area with a lot of clean water and seek medical attention. Take the same steps (flush with clean water, seek medical help) if you spill undiluted essentials on yourself, or get them in your eyes, nose, mouth or an open wound. Working with essential oils requires knowing the properties of the oils and being aware of the safety issues about the oils you use. You are encouraged to purchase the book and study it to gain the in depth knowledge required to master the art of apothecary.

Hazardous Oils:

Bitter Almond, Arnica, Boldo, Broom, Buchu, Calamus, Camphor, Cassia, Chervil, Cinnamon (bark), Costus, Elecampane, Fennel (bitter), Horseradish, Mugwort, Mustard, Oregano, Pennyroyal, Pine (dwarf), Rue, Sage (common), Santolina, Sassafras, Savine, Savory, Tansy, Thuja, Thyme (red), Tonka, Wintergreen, Wormseed and Wormwood.

Toxicity:

Essential oils which should be used in moderation (only in dilution and for a maximum of two weeks at a time) because of toxicity levels are: Ajowan, Anise Star, Basil (exotic), Bay Laurel, Bay (West Indian), Camphor (white), Cassie, Cedarwood (Virginian), Cinnamon (leaf), Clove (bud), Coriander, Eucalyptus, Fennel (sweet), Hops, Hyssop, Juniper, Nutmeg, Parsley, Pepper (black), Sage (Spanish), Tagests, Tarragon, Thyme (white), Tuberose, Turmeric, Valerian.

Dermal/Skin Irritation:

Oils which may irritate the skin, especially if used in a high concentration: Ajowan, Allspice, Aniseed, Basil (sweet), Black Pepper, Boreol, Cajeput, Caraway, Cedarwood (Virginian), Cinnamon (leaf), Clove (bud), Cornmint, Eucalyptus, Garlic, Ginger, Lemon, Parsley, Peppermint, Thyme (white) and Turmeric.

Sensitization:

Some oils may cause skin irritation only in those people with very sensitive skins or can cause an allergic reaction in some individuals. Always do a patch test before using a new oil to check for individual sensitization. Oils which may cause sensitization include: Basil (French), Bay Laurel, Benzoin, Cade, Canagaa, Cedarwood (Virginian), Chamomile (Roman and German), Citronella, Garlic, Geranium, Ginger, Hops, Jasmine, Lemon, Lemongrass, Lemon Balm (melissa), Litsea Cubeba, Lovage, Mastic, Mint, Orange, Peru Balsam, Pine (Scotch and long-leaf), Styrax, Tea Tree, Thyme (white), Tolu Balsam, Turmeric, Turpentine, Valerian, Vanilla, Verbena, Violet, Yarrow and Ylang Ylang.

Phototoxicity:

Some oils are phototoxic, meaning they can cause skin pigmentation if exposed to direct sunlight. Do not use the following oils either neat or in dilution on the skin, if the area will be exposed to the sun: Angelica Root, Bergamot (except bergapten-free type), Cumin, Ginger, Lemon (expressed), Lime (expressed), Lovage, Mandarin, Orange and Verbena.

High Blood Pressure:

Avoid the following oils in cases of high- hypertension: Hyssop, Rosemary, Sage (Spanish and common) and Thyme.

Epilepsy:

Fennel (sweet).

Diabetes:

Hyssop, Rosemary, Angelica, and Sage (all types).

Homeopathy:

Homeopathic treatment is not compatible with the following: Black Pepper, Camphor, Eucalyptus and Peppermint.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Oils & Ointments | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Special Request for Information On Honeysuckle Oil

Honeysuckle Essential Oil

 

Honeysuckle Essential Oil is:

Used to treat skin rashes, such as poison oak, cuts and abrasions on the skin. Mix a few drops in a carrier oil and massage into affected area. An anti-inflammatory; helping with arthritis, sore muscles and joints. Has antibiotic properties, therefore is effective in treating infections, colds and flu. Relaxing and calming and can be used in massage oil or bath oil.

 

Bless the Mind HoneySuckle spray
Bliss in a bottle
1 cup water
*4 drops Raw HoneySuckle Essential Oil
Combine water and honeysuckle essential oil in small spray bottle. I prefer glass bottles. I reuse glass spray bottles from other products I’ve purchased. Spray anywhere you wish. It makes a great facial mist, as well as linen mist and air freshener. I love to mist this on my face in a warm bath, and all around the house to uplift my spirit. Enjoy!

 

 

Apricot HoneySuckle Relief Oil
1 cup apricot oil
*4 drops Raw honeysuckle essential oil
Combine apricot oil and honeysuckle essential oil in any glass jar or bottle. Shake it liberally to mix well. Apple to lower back, knees, shoulders or anywhere that feels sore or tight or inflamed. HoneySuckle essential oil is a wonderful anti-inflammatory. The aroma will stimulate brain function to relax and encourage healing. Enjoy this delightful gift from the earth.

 

Aromatherapy and air purification
In glass spray bottle mix the following:
6 oz water
3 drops Honeysuckle essential oil

Use to deodorize room, lift energy and mood, as a perfume, great to spray first thing in the morning.

 

Cut and wound healer
¼ tsp hemp oil
2 drops Honeysuckle essential oil

Mix ingredients in your palm, and smooth over open cut or wound. This is a pleasing way to dress a child’s wound. The aromatic quality helps to soothe them, while the powerful healing components work fast.

 

Flower Fresh Cleaning
In spray bottle mix the follow:
1 cup white wine vinegar
1 cup water
3 drops Honeysuckle essential oil

In the kitchen, use vinegar-and-water spray to clean countertops,  range surfaces and backsplash areas.

In the bathroom, use vinegar spray cleaner to clean countertops, floors, and exterior surfaces of the toilet.

 

Honeysuckle steam facial
4 cups hot water
3 drops Honeysuckle  essential oil

Boil water, and place hot water in a glass bowl, add the honeysuckle essential oil. Lean your face over the bowl, cover your head with a towel. Remain over the steam for several minutes. Take deep breathes and enjoy the aroma-therapeutic benefits, while the honeysuckle steam opens and cleans your facial pores.

 

Leave in conditioner
1/4 – 1/2 tsp Coconut oil, depending on hair length
2 drop Honeysuckle essential oil

Combine ingredients in the palm of your hand, and massage into the ends of your hair.

 

 

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Essential Oil Flea Collar

Essential Oil Flea Collar

Another natural flea control method is to make a flea collar for your pet using essential oils. Be sure to use 100% natural pure essential oils and always dilute the oils in a base oil such as olive oil, sweet almond oil, etc.

To make a flea-repellent oil, we need:

7-8 drops of Peppermint

1-2 drops of Citronella

3-4 drops of Lemon

3-4 drops of Clary Sage

Dilute the oils in half an ounce (15 ml) of base oil. Add a few drops of the oil mixture to your pet’s bandanna or a cotton collar and, voila, you have made a natural, safe, and nice-smelling flea collar for your four-legged friend! Note that the oils will not kill the fleas, but since the smell repels them, a herbal flea collar will stop the fleas from camping out in your dog’s fur.

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