Posts Tagged With: Common cold

Herb of the Day for Oct. 16th – Boneset

Herb of the Day

 

Boneset

Agueweed, Feverwort, Sweating plant           

                         
Medicinal Uses: Boneset is one the best remedies for the relief of the associated symptoms that accompany influenza. It will speedily relieve the aches and pains as well as aid the body in dealing with any fever that is present. One to two tablespoons of the tincture in hot water is used for sweat therapy to break fevers. Taken cold, the infusion has tonic and mildly laxative effects. Taken warm, it is diaphoretic and emetic and can be used to break up a common cold, for intermittent fever, cough, and for the flu. Promotes sweating, and relaxes peripheral blood vessels. Also used for muscle cramps, sore throat, cough, headache and stuffy nose.

Boneset is emetic and laxative in large doses and may contain controversial and potentially liver-harming pyrrolizidine alkaloid.

Magickal uses: An infusion sprinkled around the house will drive away evil spirits and negativity. To break a hex or evil curse, fill a red flannel bag with equal parts ague weed, dog rose, and five finger grass when the moon is waning. Seal the bag. Consecrate and charge it. Carry the bag or wear it daily. Boneset is a feminine herb. Its ruling planet is Saturn and its element is Water.

Properties: Laxative, antispasmodic, expectorant, vasoconstrictor, cholagogue, cathartic, emetic, febrifuge, tonic, aperient, diaphoretic, diuretic, nervine, carminative, stimulant.                                                                              
Contains sesquiterpene lactones ; eupafolin, euperfolitin, eufoliatin, eufoliatorin, euperfolide, eucannabinolide and helenalin. Immunostimulatory polysaccharides, mainly 4-0-methylglucuroxylans. Flavonoids; quercitin, kaempferol, hyperoside, astragalin, rutin, eupatorin & others. And diterpenes – dendroidinic acid, hebenolide, sterols and volatile oil.

Growth: Boneset prefers damp to moist rich soils. It is a North American native perennial that reaches 2 to 4 feet high, and grows in partial sun.  The rough, hairy stem grows to a height of 1-5 feet from a horizontal, crooked rootstock. The leaves are 4-8 inches long, rough, serrate, and taper to a long point. Leaves perfoliate (stem appears to be inserted through the middle of leaf pairs), wrinkled. Terminal corymbs of numerous, fuzzy, white or pale purple flower heads are borne in dense, flat-topped clusters terminating the stems, blossoms appear in August and September. The fruit is a tufted achene. It is found in swampy areas, moist meadows, low-lying damp ground, wet woods, and along stream banks in eastern North America.

Infusion: use 1 level tsp. herb with 1 cup boiling water; steep for 30 minutes and strain. As a tonic, take cold, 1 tsp. 3-6 times a day.

A salve for external application may be made by combining equal parts of the powdered herb and Vaseline.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day – GINGER

Herb of the Day – GINGER

Acts as an aid to ingestion or colds (tea form). Also in tea form, good for cramps, to stimulate the digestive organs, migraines and nausea, external stiffness. Can be added to the bath as a way to ease pain and increase circulation, but only use a few sprinkles, not too much, like cayenne, ginger quickly brings the blood to the surface of the skin. For pain you can also soak cloths in ginger tea and apply them directly to the painful areas. A good healing tea is made from a pinch of peppermint, a pinch of ginger and either a pinch of clove powder or 2 bruised cloves, add 1 cup of hot water and steep. Ginger tea sweetened with honey can help alleviate cold symptoms.

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Four Thieves Vinegar Tonic

Four Thieves Vinegar Tonic

 

This is a spring tonic which is also good for occasional use in the heat of the summer. It adds potassium to the system, and is supposed to clean the blood. It is definitely a home remedy curio—and is not included here as a serious medical recommendation.

Take a tablespoon of Four Thieves Vinegar, place it in a small glass or cup. Add a teaspoon of honey and mix. Then add a tablespoon of hot water and drink

 

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Daily Feng Shui Tip for Nov. 12 – ‘Chicken Soup for the Soul Day’

It’s ‘Chicken Soup for the Soul Day’ so let’s serve a bowl of therapy for the body and spirit. This soup is the traditional ‘go to’ when nursing the common cold, but it’s also a protective food that can ward off the evil eye. Legend speculates that chicken soup can protect from negative energies created by angry, irrational people. In fact, even mainstream medical science supports its protective benefits. Chicken soup contains several nutrients that stimulate and strengthen the immune system while cleansing your aura, especially if you’ve been exposed to someone else’s negativity. Eating protein-rich foods like chicken, fish, eggs and dairy can help one feel more grounded and balanced and better connected to our bodies and to the earth around us. So the next time you settle in with a good book, why not have a big bowl of self-nurturing to go with it? But if soup just doesn’t cut it when dealing with negative people, then this recipe might. Write the offending person’s name in green ink on white paper. Fold that paper in four and put it in a glass, lidded jar. Pour enough honey over the paper to cover it and then tightly seal the jar. Place a small white candle either atop or immediately alongside the jar and then each day for nine days straight light the candle while sending healing and forgiveness to that person. On the ninth day allow the candle to burn completely out while disposing of the sealed jar anywhere outside your living space. Sweet and sour, just like Chinese chicken soup for the soul!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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Herb of the Day for November 5th – Hyssop

Herb of the Day

 

 

HYSSOP

(Hyssopus officinalis)

To Grow:
Perennial herb. Grows to 1 1/2-2 ft. high. Has narrow, dark green, pungent leaves and a profusion of dark blue flower spikes that appear July-November. There are also white and pink-flowered forms available. Plant in full sun or light shade. Fairly drought resistant.

Uses:
It is used in coughs, bronchitis, and chronic catarrh. It can be used for the
common cold due top its diaphoretic state. As a Nervine it may be used in
anxiety, hysteria, and petite mal (a form of epilepsy).

Part used:
Dried aerial parts. Collect the flowering tops in late summer.

Infusion:
Pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1-2 tsp. of the dried herb and leave to infuse
for 10-15 minutes. Drink three times a day.

Tincture:
Take 1-4 ml of the tincture three times a day.

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Slippery Elm Bark

SLIPPERY ELM BARK

Historically used to soothe sore throats, coughs, and upset stomachs, this beneficial bark is still available in bulk and in herbal cough drops and throat lozenges.

How to use:

For tea, 1 to 3 teaspoons of powdered bark per cup, boiled and simmered 15 minutes. Up to 3 cups per day.

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Daily Feng Shui Tip for September 12 – ‘Mallow’

According to the Feng Shui floral calendar, the plant most associated with the month of September is the perennial aromatic plant mallow, also called the marsh mallow. This herb blossoms between May and August but reaches maturity in September. Mallow is often called a ‘cure-all’ herb due to the fact that its roots and mucilage were believed to heal digestive disorders, urinary tract inflammations and infections, as well as relieving upper respiratory problems caused by the common cold. Native Americans highly recommended this herb as a poultice to alleviate pain and soreness from insect stings. The soothing effects of the marshmallow plant are generally understood in holistic circles to relieve irritated or inflamed skin. It is also used in infusions and tinctures aimed at helping to heal gastritis, ulcers and throat ailments such as laryngitis. It’s clear that there’s more to the marsh mallow than being just a confectionary delight!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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Herb of the Day for June 11 – Chaparral Leaf

Herb of the Day – Chaparral Leaf
Native to the Southwestern parts of US and Mexico, Chaparral Leaf, or Larrea tridentata has long been used among Native Americans to treat arthritis, respiratory ailments, and even cancer. Interestingly, the plant produces a sap that keeps other plants from growing near itself, and while the branches may wither or fall off, the crown rarely dies and sometimes reproduces itself. Indeed, an example in California is believed by some to be well over 11,000 years old. For these qualities it was often revered within local lore, and the Southwestern Native Americans often used the sap as a sunscreen, and the plant in general as a treatment for assorted ailments, including blood poisoning, and liver disease. They also used to the leave to brew a tea that they would use to rid the body of parasites.

Modern herbalists see it most commonly as an expectorant, of great use in treating respiratory issues like asthma, bronchitis, and the coughing symptoms of the common cold. Chaparral Leaf has also been shown to possess antioxidant qualities, believed to help destroy the particles that destroy cells and possibly cause cancer. Studies have been conducted that show the leaf to aid in restricting cancerous growth. While the leaf possesses a great many positive qualities, it has been shown to occasionally react poorly with the liver, and you should discontinue use if you experience nausea, fever, fatigue, or Jaundice while using the herb.

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