Posts Tagged With: Coat of arms

Quiz of the Day for July 18 – What Your Sleep Position Says About You

What Your Sleep Position Says About You

by Melissa Breyer

 

Starfish? Soldier? Yearner? How do you sleep? I fall firmly into the Fetus category of sleeping  positions–curled up on my side–which, according to researchers at the Sleep  Assessment and Advisory Service, suggests that I am a tough cookie with a  sensitive heart. (And yes, it’s true…underneath it all I am a big mush.)

Sleep scientists believe the position in which a person sleeps offers  important clues about their personality. Director of the Sleep Assessment and Advisory  Service, Professor Chris Idzikowski, analyzed six common sleeping positions and  found that each is associated with particular personality traits.

The Fetus This is the most common sleeping position,  adopted by 41 percent of the 1,000 people who took part in the survey. More than  twice as many women as men tend to adopt this position. Those who curl up in the  fetus position are described as tough on the outside but sensitive at heart.  They may be shy when they first meet somebody, but soon relax.

The Log Lying on your side with both arms down by your  side is the sleep position favored by 14 percent of the people in the study. I’d  adopt this position if it guaranteed sleeping like a log, but perhaps not at the  risk of being naive. These sleepers are easy going, social people who like being  part of the in-crowd, and who are trusting of strangers. However, they may be  gullible.

The Yearner 13 percent of people sleep in the pose of  the yearner–on their side with both arms out in front are said to have an open  nature, but can be suspicious and cynical. They are slow to make up their minds,  but once they have taken a decision, they are unlikely to change it.

Soldier Are you one of the 8 percent who sleep lying on  your back with both arms pinned to your sides? Well hello, soldier. People who  sleep in this position are generally quiet and reserved. They don’t like a fuss,  but set high standards for themselves and others. The soldier style is more  likely to lead to snoring and a bad night’s sleep.

The Freefaller If you sleep on your stomach with your  hands around the pillow and your head turned to one side, you sleep in the  freefall position. You are probably often gregarious and brash, but can be nervy  and thin-skinned underneath, and don’t like criticism or extreme situations.  Seven percent of sleepers assume this posture, which happens to be good for digestion.

The Starfish About 5 percent choose to lay on their back  with both arms up around the pillow. These sleepers make good friends because  they are always ready to listen to others, and offer help when needed. They generally  don’t like to be the center of attention. The starfish position is more likely  to lead to snoring and a bad night’s sleep

What do you think? Are these researchers on to something? Leave a comment  below.

 

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What Your Sleep Position Says About You

What Your Sleep Position Says About You

  • Melissa Breyer

Starfish? Soldier? Yearner? How do you sleep? I fall firmly into the Fetus category of sleeping positions–curled up on my side–which, according to researchers at the Sleep Assessment and Advisory Service, suggests that I am a tough cookie with a sensitive heart. (And yes, it’s true…underneath it all I am a big mush.)

Sleep scientists believe the position in which a person sleeps offers important clues about their personality. Director of the Sleep Assessment and Advisory Service, Professor Chris Idzikowski, analyzed six common sleeping positions and found that each is associated with particular personality traits.

 

The Fetus
This is the most common sleeping position, adopted by 41 percent of the 1,000 people who took part in the survey. More than twice as many women as men tend to adopt this position. Those who curl up in the fetus position are described as tough on the outside but sensitive at heart. They may be shy when they first meet somebody, but soon relax.

The Log
Lying on your side with both arms down by your side is the sleep position favored by 14 percent of the people in the study. I’d adopt this position if it guaranteed sleeping like a log, but perhaps not at the risk of being naive. These sleepers are easy going, social people who like being part of the in-crowd, and who are trusting of strangers. However, they may be gullible.

The Yearner
13 percent of people sleep in the pose of the yearner–on their side with both arms out in front are said to have an open nature, but can be suspicious and cynical. They are slow to make up their minds, but once they have taken a decision, they are unlikely to change it.

 

Soldier
Are you one of the 8 percent who sleep lying on your back with both arms pinned to your sides? Well hello, soldier. People who sleep in this position are generally quiet and reserved. They don’t like a fuss, but set high standards for themselves and others. The soldier style is more likely to lead to snoring and a bad night’s sleep.

The Freefaller
If you sleep on your stomach with your hands around the pillow and your head turned to one side, you sleep in the freefall position. You are probably often gregarious and brash, but can be nervy and thin-skinned underneath, and don’t like criticism or extreme situations. Seven percent of sleepers assume this posture, which happens to be good for digestion.

The Starfish
About 5 percent choose to lay on their back with both arms up around the pillow. These sleepers make good friends because they are always ready to listen to others, and offer help when needed. They generally don’t like to be the center of attention. The starfish position is more likely to lead to snoring and a bad night’s sleep

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Dragons In Heraldry

Dragons In Heraldry

Even through times of persecution, the dragon did not fade from sight. In European countries, and China in particular, the draconic image remained alive in stories. European families, especially used the dragon in coats of arms. The European art of heraldry and coats of arms still employs the depiction of dragons in its art. The Prince of Wales has a red and gold dragon in his coat of arms and on his flag. The families of de Drago, von Drachenfels, de Draek, de Dragon de Ramillies, and Dragomanni, among others, all have a dragon on their coats of arms, as did the family of Sir Francis Drake.


In heraldry, a dragon with two legs is called a wyvern; a dragon without wings is a worm; a serpentine dragon with wings but no legs is an amphiptere; a dragon with wings and legs is termed a guivre. Further meaning of these draconic images was determined by how the dragon was posed: rampant (forelegs raised), a passant (one foreleg raised), statant (all four feet on the ground), wings endorsed (upright over the back), displayed or depressed tail nowed (knotted). Even further definition was determined by color: or (gold), gules (red), sable (black), or vert (green).

Categories: Dragon Magick | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dragons In Heraldry

Dragons In Heraldry

 

Even through times of persecution, the dragon did not fade from sight. In European countries, and China in particular, the draconic image remained alive in stories. European families, especially used the dragon in coats of arms. The European art of heraldry and coats of arms still employs the depiction of dragons in its art. The Prince of Wales has a red and gold dragon in his coat of arms and on his flag. The families of de Drago, von Drachenfels, de Draek, de Dragon de Ramillies, and Dragomanni, among others, all have a dragon on their coats of arms, as did the family of Sir Francis Drake.


In heraldry, a dragon with two legs is called a wyvern; a dragon without wings is a worm; a serpentine dragon with wings but no legs is an amphiptere; a dragon with wings and legs is termed a guivre. Further meaning of these draconic images was determined by how the dragon was posed: rampant (forelegs raised), a passant (one foreleg raised), statant (all four feet on the ground), wings endorsed (upright over the back), displayed or depressed tail nowed (knotted). Even further definition was determined by color: or (gold), gules (red), sable (black), or vert (green).

Categories: Dragon Magick | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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