Posts Tagged With: Chinese philosophy

Your Daily MahJong Tile for November 7th is Summer, Symbol: The Woodcutter

Your Daily Tile
November 7, 2014 

Summer
Symbol: The Woodcutter

The Woodcutter employs three of the 5 elements central to Chinese philosophy: Fire, Wood and Metal. He is ambitious and full of drive and energy. He represents gain and success through dedicated work.

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Your Ancient Symbol Card for December 5th is Balance

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

Balance

Balance denotes the benefits of keeping the use of your energies justifiably proportioned between your pursuits. The symbol Yin and Yang is used to represent the balance. Yin and Yang is possibly the most elegant and sometimes elusive definition of  Balance there is. While Balance is rarely if ever perfect, being far out of Balance means that while one part of you may be thriving tremendously, another part of your life may be wilting.

As a daily card, Balance indicates a need to find and maintain a level physical and spiritual state. It suggest you may be concentrating your energy on one or a few things so much that you are neglecting other important aspects of your life. While this is often necessary to make immediate gains it can lead to missing out on the diverse richness of life in the long term.

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Today’s I Ching Hexagram for Oct. 8: 38: Diverging Interests

38: Diverging Interests

An image of estrangement is indicated here. One example used in ancient Chinese texts is how when brothers and sisters marry, they grow apart, since their allegiances now lie with new family groups. Though they will remain close enough to successfully deal with problems and share minor interests, they will be unable to undertake anything big together. Simply put, when people grow apart — even for the most natural of reasons — their points of view, values and interests start to diverge.

Diverging interests bring opposition into the world of human affairs. And when differences morph into alienation and enmity, no good results. But when opposition takes the form of healthy competition, or when contrasting energies or positions are seen as part of the natural order of things, good fortune is still possible.

Even when diverging energies make a situation seem stagnant or futile, there are always creative possibilities inherent in polarities. One is reminded of the yin-yang interplay that is fundamental to the creation of life itself. But when opposition arises from issues of principle, you must hold to your integrity and individuality. And avoid becoming involved with vulgar or base people who do not share your values. With both people and companies, one measure of stature is the quality of the competition.

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