Posts Tagged With: Chinese dragon

Whispering Woods Dragon Lore course – Lesson Four

Whispering Woods Dragon Lore course
Types of Chinese Dragons

Lesson Four

    Types of Dragons:

There are nine major types of Chinese dragons. These include the horned dragon, the winged dragon, the celestial dragon (which supports and protects the mansions of the gods), the spiritual dragon which generates wind and rain for the benefit of mankind), the dragon of hidden treasures (which keeps guard over concealed wealth), the coiling dragon (which lives in water), and the yellow dragon (which once emerged from water and presented the legendary Emperor Fu Shi with the elements of writing)

The last of the nine is the dragon king, which actually consists of four separate dragons, each of which rules over one of the four seas, those of the East, South, West, and North.

The most powerful generalized type of Chinese dragon is the horned dragon, or “lung”, which can produce rain and is totally deaf. Additionally, there is a homeless dragon (Ii) that lives in the ocean and another type (chiao) that is scale-covered and usually inhabits marshes but also keeps dens in the mountains.

There are also nine ways the Chinese have traditionally represented these dragons, each one revealing a different dragon characteristic.

There are dragons carved on the tops of bells and gongs, because of the beast’s habit of calling loudly when attacked.

A second type is carved on the screws of fiddles, since most dragons are fond of music.

A third is carved on the tops of stone tablets, because of dragons’ love of literature.

A fourth is found at the bottom of stone monuments, as dragons can support heavy weights.

A fifth is placed on the eaves of temples, as dragons are ever alert to danger.

A sixth occurs on the beams of bridges, since dragons are fond of water.

A seventh is carved on Buddha’s throne, as dragons like to rest.

An eighth is placed on the hilts of swords, since dragons are known to be capable of slaughter.

The ninth is carved on prison gates, as these are dragons that are fond of quarreling and trouble making.

The colors of Chinese dragons are evidently quite variable, but in the case of the chiao type its back is striped with green, its sides are yellow, and it is crimson underneath.

The nine major characteristics of a lung type dragon include a head like a camel’s, horns like a deer’s, eyes like a hare’s, ears like a bull’s, a neck like an iguana’s, a belly like a frog’s, scales like a carp’s, paws like a tiger’s, and claws like an eagle’s. It has a pair of large canine teeth in its upper jaw. The long, tendril-like whiskers extending from either side of its mouth are probably used for feeling its way along the bottom of muddy ponds.

In color dragons varies from greenish to golden, with a series of alternating short and long spines extending down the back and along the tail, where they become longer. One specimen had wings at its side, and walked on top of the water. Another tossed its mane back and forth making noises that sounded like a flute.

Cow-heads are also common. A ten-footer, found lying on the banks of China’s Yangtze River, was different from most because of its long, thick eyebrows. A Yellow River variety, seen on shore in the 1920s by a Chinese teacher, was bright blue, and as big as five cows. Both dragons crawled into the water as soon as it started to rain.

A few dragons begin life as fish. Carp, which successfully jump rapids and leap over waterfalls, change into fish-dragons. A popular saying, “The carp has leaped through the dragon’s gate,” means success, especially for students who have passed their exams.

Chinese Dragons are divided into five categories and these are:

Celestial Dragons who guard the mansions of the gods

Spiritual Dragons who rule wind & rain but can also cause flooding

Earth Dragons who cleanse the rivers & deepen the oceans

Treasure-Guarding Dragons who protect precious metals & stones

Imperial Dragons; dragons with five claws instead of the usual four

Male dragons sometimes mate with other kinds of animals. A dragon fathers an elephant when he mates with a pig, and he sires a racehorse, after mating with a mare.

Having sinuous serpentine bodies and four legs, eastern dragons do not usually breath fire, nor do they fly. According to Wang Fu (Han 206 BCE-220 CE) dragons are made up of many different types of animals of the Earth: the body of a snake, scales of a carp, head of a camel, horns of a deer, the eyes of a hare, ears like a bull, a neck like an iguana, belly of a frog, paws like a tigers, and claws like an eagle. A lion-type mane decorates its neck, its chin, and each elbow.

They also carry two antler-like horns on their wide-mouthed head, and two long whiskers spread out from their snout. They are depicted in many colors like blue, black, white, red, or yellow. Oriental dragons are usually shown with a pearl in their mouth, under their chin, or in their claws.

They use the power emendating from the pearl to ascend to heaven. The male dragon holds a war club in its tail while the female dragon holds a sensu or fan in its tail.

Quiz:

1. Chinese Dragons are divided into ______ categories.
2. The ninth dragon is carved on _______   ______.   3. The most powerful generalized type of Chinese dragon is the ________   _______.
4. There are ______   major types of Chinese dragons.
5. The carp has leaped through the dragon’s gate,” means _______.
6. Spiritual Dragons rule the ______ and _____.
7. Eastern dragons do not usually breathe ______, nor do they ____.

Source:

Author & Researcher

Crick

Website: Whispering Woods

Crick also offers an online ezine which is located at Black Hen E-Zine

 

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Your Ancient Symbols Card for Feb. 11 is The Western Dragon

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Western Dragon

Unlike the beneficent Easter Dragon, The Western Dragon is a symbol of totally unleashed destructive power that is set upon anyone who crosses the Dragon’s path. The Western Dragon also hordes treasures that should rightfully be ours, and whose absence deprives us from being complete. The challenges set  before us by the Western Dragon are truly prodigious, because they denote a force whose sole intent is not simply to keep us from moving forward in our lives, but to usurp all that we have previously gained as well. What is even more disturbing about the force behind the Western Dragon is that it may well indicate primal forces in ourselves so powerful that they do in fact turn us into our own worst enemy.

As a daily card, The Western Dragon is a powerful negative force intent upon thwarting your progress. In such a short time frame it is most likely you’re being undermined by an external force–someone who wants what you have gained or gains your are near realizing. While formidable, this bellicose entity does have vulnerabilities. First, there is nothing subtle about the forces represented by The Western Dragon, so the source will be easy for you to identify. Secondly, The Western Dragon represents undisciplined, primal energies that aren’t easy to control, so they are susceptible to logical responses steeped in self control. In short, don’t panic, act deliberately and decisively, and you will weather this storm.

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Your Ancient Symbol Card for Jan. 16th is The Western Dragon

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Western Dragon

Unlike the beneficent Easter Dragon, The Western Dragon is a symbol of totally unleashed destructive power that is set upon anyone who crosses the Dragon’s path. The Western Dragon also hordes treasures that should rightfully be ours, and whose absence deprives us from being complete. The challenges set  before us by the Western Dragon are truly prodigious, because they denote a force whose sole intent is not simply to keep us from moving forward in our lives, but to usurp all that we have previously gained as well. What is even more disturbing about the force behind the Western Dragon is that it may well indicate primal forces in ourselves so powerful that they do in fact turn us into our own worst enemy.

As a daily card, The Western Dragon is a powerful negative force intent upon thwarting your progress. In such a short time frame it is most likely you’re being undermined by an external force–someone who wants what you have gained or gains your are near realizing. While formidable, this bellicose entity does have vulnerabilities. First, there is nothing subtle about the forces represented by The Western Dragon, so the source will be easy for you to identify. Secondly, The Western Dragon represents undisciplined, primal energies that aren’t easy to control, so they are susceptible to logical responses steeped in self control. In short, don’t panic, act deliberately and decisively, and you will weather this storm.

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Your Ancient Symbol Card for Nov. 12 is The Western Dragon

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Western Dragon

Unlike the beneficent Easter Dragon, The Western Dragon is a symbol of totally unleashed destructive power that is set upon anyone who crosses the Dragon’s path. The Western Dragon also hordes treasures that should rightfully be ours, and whose absence deprives us from being complete. The challenges set  before us by the Western Dragon are truly prodigious, because they denote a force whose sole intent is not simply to keep us from moving forward in our lives, but to usurp all that we have previously gained as well. What is even more disturbing about the force behind the Western Dragon is that it may well indicate primal forces in ourselves so powerful that they do in fact turn us into our own worst enemy.

As a daily card, The Western Dragon is a powerful negative force intent upon thwarting your progress. In such a short time frame it is most likely you’re being undermined by an external force–someone who wants what you have gained or gains your are near realizing. While formidable, this bellicose entity does have vulnerabilities. First, there is nothing subtle about the forces represented by The Western Dragon, so the source will be easy for you to identify. Secondly, The Western Dragon represents undisciplined, primal energies that aren’t easy to control, so they are susceptible to logical responses steeped in self control. In short, don’t panic, act deliberately and decisively, and you will weather this storm.

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Your Ancient Symbol Card for Nov. 10th is The Western Dragon

Your Ancient Symbol Card for Today

The Western Dragon

Unlike the beneficent Easter Dragon, The Western Dragon is a symbol of totally unleashed destructive power that is set upon anyone who crosses the Dragon’s path. The Western Dragon also hordes treasures that should rightfully be ours, and whose absence deprives us from being complete. The challenges set  before us by the Western Dragon are truly prodigious, because they denote a force whose sole intent is not simply to keep us from moving forward in our lives, but to usurp all that we have previously gained as well. What is even more disturbing about the force behind the Western Dragon is that it may well indicate primal forces in ourselves so powerful that they do in fact turn us into our own worst enemy.

As a daily card, The Western Dragon is a powerful negative force intent upon thwarting your progress. In such a short time frame it is most likely you’re being undermined by an external force–someone who wants what you have gained or gains your are near realizing. While formidable, this bellicose entity does have vulnerabilities. First, there is nothing subtle about the forces represented by The Western Dragon, so the source will be easy for you to identify. Secondly, The Western Dragon represents undisciplined, primal energies that aren’t easy to control, so they are susceptible to logical responses steeped in self control. In short, don’t panic, act deliberately and decisively, and you will weather this storm.

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Your Ancient Symbol for November 4th is The Eastern Dragon

Your Ancient Symbol for Today

The Eastern Dragon

The Eastern Dragon derives its symbolism from eons of rich, Asian culture. The Eastern Dragon is a revered creature who brings good fortune and power to those under its influence. It influences situations by supplying courage, nobility and perseverance. The Eastern Dragon is the most Yang of creatures in Chinese mythology, and represents the male character at its strongest and best.

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The Element of Fire: Fafnir (Dragons of Fire and Sunbeams)

The Element of Fire: Fafnir (Dragons of Fire and Sunbeams)

The element of Fire governs the southern quarter of the circle. Its dragon ruler is Fafnir (faf’-near) who oversees the dragons of Fire and the sunbeams. Its color is pure red; it is considered warm and dry. The positive association of Fire are: Noon, summer, the dagger and sword, candles, incense burner, any kind of helpful fire, the Sun, blood, enthusiasm, activity, change, passion, courage, daring, will power, leadership. Negative associations are: hate, jealousy, fear, anger, war, ego, conflicts, lightning, volcanoes, harmful fire of any kind.

Subspecies of the Fire—element dragon family are those of fire and volcanoes. The subspecies of desert and arid–region dragons, and those of chaos and destruction, often work closely with draconic entities of this element.

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Dragon and Weather Magick

Dragon and Weather Magick

 

Chinese dragons are said to have a 4,000 year birth cycle and do not grow their wings to fly until the last thousand years. They are described as having bearded lion’s mane-like faces, 81 or more scales on their back (in multiples of nine, their sacred number) and five huge claws. Japanese dragons only have three claws.

Chinese dragons are made up of the parts of many creatures, including two antlers like horns on their heads. They are depicted in blue, black, white or red and often carry a pearl in their mouth or between their claws. The pearl symbolizes wisdom, the power of healing, fertility and the moon.

Their mating and birthing cycles can cause extremes of weather, whirlwinds, hurricanes and storms that last for many hours, especially when the male dragon stirs up the energies of the newborn dragon (a mere 1,000 years old) as it emerges from its jewel-like egg.

Clouds, mists and fog were believd to be formed from dragon breath and rain was thought to fall as they fought. Rain also was caused if their claws caught in a cloud as they roamed across the skies. If the fighting became too fierce, a storm occurred. Certain powerful dragons could regulate the rainfall to ensure a good harvest and they are still recalled in dragon processions like those held on the Chinese New Year.

Chinese and Japanese dragons are also associated with waters, such as lakes, river and the ocean. The four Japanese dragon kings who control the four seas, are given offering if there is too much or little rain since they, like the Chinese dragons, are believed to have the power to control the weather.

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