Posts Tagged With: Ancient Egypt

Poppet History – Global Poppet Magic

Poppet History – Global Poppet Magic

Ramses and the Poppets:

When most people think of a poppet, they automatically think of the Voodoo doll, thanks to this item’s negative portrayal in movies and on television. However, the use of dolls in sympathetic magic goes back several millennia. Back in the days of ancient Egypt, the enemies of Ramses III (who were numerous, and included some of his harem women and at least one high-ranking official) used wax images of the Pharaoh, to bring about his death.

Greek Kolossi:

It wasn’t uncommon for the Greeks to use sympathetic magic in workings related to love or war. Christopher Faraone, Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures at the University of Chicago, is one of the foremost authorities on Greek magic today, and says that Greek poppets called Kolossoi were sometimes used to restrain a ghost or even a dangerous deity, or to bind two lovers together. In Idyll 2, The Witch (Pharmakeutria), written about 200 b.c.e., the tragedian Theocritus refers to melting and burning wax dolls. He relates the tale of Simaetha, rejected by Delphis, attempts to get her lover back with magic.

The Princess Who Played with Dolls:

Wax dolls certainly weren’t limited to the ancient classical world. The one-time Princess of Wales, Caroline of Brunswick, was married to the man who later became King George IV, and evidently couldn’t stand him. She spent many hours forming wax dolls of her husband and jabbing them with pins. Although there’s no concrete evidence as to what this may have done to George, when Caroline ran off to Italy with her young lover, George didn’t object.

The royal couple remained married but lived separately until Caroline’s death in 1821, according to Witchcraft and Evidence in Early Modern England by Malcolm Gaskill.

West African Fetish Magic:

West African slaves brought with them a doll called a fetish when they were forced to leave their homes and come to the American colonies. In this case, the doll is not so much representative of an individual, but is in fact possessed by spirits connected to the doll’s owner. A fetish contains significant power and is typically worn or carried by its owner as a talisman. During America’s Colonial period, slave owners were allowed to kill any slave found with a fetish in his possession.

American Hoodoo and Folk Magic:

In American Hoodoo and folk magic, the use of poppets as a magical tool became popular following the Civil War. There is some dispute as to whether the dolls are used at all in Haiti, which is the home of Vodoun religion, and a few sources disagree on whether the use of poppets is truly a Vodoun practice or not. However, the Voodoo Museum of New Orleans does stock a variety of dolls in their gift shop.

Regardless of how you make your poppet — out of cloth, a chunk of meat, or a glob of wax, remember that poppets have a long tradition behind them, and that tradition is influences by the magical practices of a wide range of cultures. Treat your poppets well, and they will do the same for you.

 

Source:

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Some Changes in Directions in Posts on Coven Life

Merry meet brothers and sisters. Since I no longer classify myself as pure Wiccan and as my pagan spiritual path encompasses other traditions as well, I feel it is time I step away from only posting things based upon Wiccan tradition. The reason for this is so I and my site can introduce other types of pagan spirituality both from modern and ancient times to those who take lessons from me will have a broader range of what pagans and witches can believe in. Also for anyone interested in learning more about different pagan spiritual paths.

A pagan spiritual path is also referred to as ‘ The Old Ways” The definition of Pagan is:

noun
1.

(no longer in technical use) one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks.
2.

a member of a religious, spiritual, or cultural community based on the worship of nature or the earth; a neopagan.
3.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. (in historical contexts) a person who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim; a heathen.
  2. an irreligious or hedonistic person.
  3. an uncivilized or unenlightened person.
adjective
4.

of, relating to, or characteristic of pagans.
5.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. relating to the worship or worshipers of any religion that is neither Christian, Jewish, nor Muslim.
  2. irreligious or hedonistic.
  3. (of a person) uncivilized or unenlightened.

This came from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pagan If you want to know the origins or other information on the word just click on the link. You may find other definitions for the word pagan in different dictionaries, but this is the definition that I have been taught.

If there is an area of interest that I don’t post on and you would like me to please let me know and I will see what I can do. I won’t be posting daily horoscopes, runes, tarot cards or the other types of daily posts as seen on Witches of The Craft as Lady of the Abyss and her staff do a fantastic job covering those areas.

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Today Is …


Ostara Comments

Today Is …

 

March 20-21 Spring Equinox. Do a ritual bath today for personal “spring cleaning.”

On this day, an annual Spring Harvest Festival was celebrated in ancient Egypt, along the banks of the River Nile, in honor of the Mother-Goddess and the enchantress, Isis.
This day is sacred to the goddess Fortuna, the Morrigan, the Norns, the Three Fates, and the Three Mothers (Lakshmi, Parvati, and Sarasvati).

The Spring or Vernal Equinox – 8:00 P.M. EST. The word equinox is derived from the Latin words meaning “equal night.” The equinox refers to the point at which the Sun crosses the plane of the Earth’s Equator from south to north, making night and day equal length all over the planet, signaling the beginning of nature’s renewal in the northern part of the world. Pagan: The Spring Equinox — called the Festival of Trees, Ostara, and the Rites of Eostre, among many names in many traditions — is a fertility festival celebrating the birth of Spring and the reawakening.
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Southern Hemisphere ~ Mabon  Thanksgiving (Second Harvest) Autumn Equinox ~ Giving thanks, Reflection.

Egyptian: Feast of Sexual Fertility of Min.

March 21  Day Dedicated to Sun Goddesses. Honor the Sun’s role in Spring’s rebirth with incense and flame.

On this date (approximately), the Sun enters the astrological sign of Aries. Persons born under the sign of the Ram are said to be courageous, intelligent, impulsive, and aggressive. Aries is a fire sign and is ruled by the planet Mars.
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Slavic Pagan: Maslenitsa – Suhii (March) 21 – Maslenitsa is a very ancient festival, the holiday of the Spring Equinox and the end of the winter frosts.People enjoy themselves, engaging in much feasting, dancing,wearing of masks, playing on traditional musical instruments, and contests of strength, all to enact spring unbridled, in action and fighting. Traditional pastries are also baked, called blini (a type of potato pancake), to symbolize the sun. More: http://www.irminsul.org/arc/010sz.html

Attis – Attis was the lover and grandson of Cybele, the Attic Goddess who was known as mother of mountains and depicted flanked by lions. When Attis betrayed her, she hunted him down and drove him insane. He tore off his genitals because they had caused him to betray her.

Originally a Phyrgian Goddess, Cybele’s worship was imported to Rome, where she was called Magna Mater (Great Mother). Emperor Claudius popularized the Phyrgian tradition of bringing a young pine tree representing Attis into the city like a corpse, swathed in linen and woolen sashes and decked with violets. Members of the Tree Bearer’s Guild (dendrophori) carried it through the city gate and into Cybele’s sanctuary which stood on Vatican Hill, near where St Peter’s stands now.
Rufus, Anneli, The World Holiday Book, Harper San Francisco 1994

Remember the ancient ways and keep them sacred!

•           •           •           •

Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast

 

 

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Deity of the Day for March 2 is Bastet

Deity of the Day

Bastet

 

Bastet was a goddess in ancient Egyptian religion, worshiped as early as the Second Dynasty (2890 BC). As Bast, she was the goddess of warfare in Lower Egypt, the Nile River delta region, before the unification of the cultures of ancient Egypt. Her name is also spelled Baast, Ubaste, and Baset.

The two uniting cultures had deities that shared similar roles and usually the same imagery. In Upper Egypt, Sekhmet was the parallel warrior lioness deity to Bast. Often similar deities merged into one with the unification, but that did not occur with these deities with such strong roots in their cultures. Instead, these goddesses began to diverge. During the Twenty-Second Dynasty (c. 945–715 BC), Bast had changed from a lioness warrior deity into a major protector deity represented as a cat. Bastet, the name associated with this later identity, is the name commonly used by scholars today to refer to this deity.

 

Name

Bastet, the form of the name which is most commonly adopted by Egyptologists today because of its use in later dynasties, is a modern convention offering one possible reconstruction. In early Egyptian, her name appears to have been 𓃀ꜣ𓊃𓏏𓏏. In Egyptian writing, the second 𓏏 marks a feminine ending, but was not usually pronounced, and the aleph may have moved to a position before the accented syllable, ꜣ𓃀𓊃𓏏. By the first millennium, then, 𓃀ꜣ𓊃𓏏𓏏 would have been something like *Ubaste (< *Ubastat) in Egyptian speech, later becoming Coptic Oubaste.

During later dynasties, Bast was assigned a lesser role in the pantheon bearing the name Bastet, but retained. Thebes became the capital of Ancient Egypt during the 18th Dynasty. As they rose to great power the priests of the temple of Amun, dedicated to the primary local deity, advanced the stature of their titular deity to national prominence and shifted the relative stature of others in the Egyptian pantheon. Diminishing her status, they began referring to Bast with the added suffix, as “Bastet” and their use of the new name was well-documented, becoming very familiar to researchers. by the 22nd dynasty the transition had occurred in all regions.

The town of Bast’s cult (see below) was known in Greek as Boubastis (Βούβαστις). The Hebrew rendering of the name for this town is Pî-beset (“House of Bastet”), spelled without Vortonsilbe.

What the name of the goddess means remains uncertain. One recent suggestion by Stephen Quirke (Ancient Egyptian Religion) explains it as meaning “She of the ointment jar”. This ties in with the observation that her name was written with the hieroglyph “ointment jar” (𓃀ꜣ𓊃) and that she was associated with protective ointments, among other things.[3] Also compare the name alabaster which might, through Greek, come from the name of the goddess.

She was the goddess of protection against contagious diseases and evil spirits.

She is also known as The Eye of Ra.

From lioness-goddess to cat-goddess

Bastet first appears in the 3rd millennium BC, where she is depicted as either a fierce lioness or a woman with the head of a lioness. Images of Bast were often created from a local stone, named alabaster today. The lioness was the fiercest hunter among the animals in Africa, hunting in co-operative groups of related females.

Originally she was viewed as the protector goddess of Lower Egypt. As protector, she was seen as defender of the pharaoh, and consequently of the later chief male deity, Ra, who was also a solar deity, gaining her the titles Lady of Flame and Eye of Ra.

Her role in the Egyptian pantheon became diminished as Sekhmet, a similar lioness war deity, became more dominant in the unified culture of Lower and Upper Egypt known as the Two Lands.

In the first millennium BC, when domesticated cats were popularly kept as pets, Bastet began to be represented as a woman with the head of a cat and ultimately, by the 22nd dynasty emerged as the quintessential Egyptian cat-goddess. In the Middle Kingdom, the domestic cat appeared as Bast’s sacred animal and after the New Kingdom she was depicted as a woman with the head of a cat or a lioness, carrying a sacred rattle and a box or basket.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

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Deity of the Day for November 25th – Amun, Egyptian God

Deity of the Day

 

Amun

Egyptian God

 

Amun is considered as one of the most important and powerful gods of ancient Egypt. He existed as early as the primeval times of the Ogdoad cosmogony and evolved as one of the gods responsible for the creation of the world from the chaos that is Nun. He if often represented as bearded man wearing a cap surmounted by two tall plumes made of red ostrich feathers usually seated on a throne holding the ankh on one hand and the was scepter on the other. His name may also be spelled as Amon, Amoun, Ammon, Amoon, or Amen that translates into the “Hidden One” suggestive of his role as the invisible god of the wind and air. His wife and consort in the Hermopolitan worship is Amaunet.

Aside from his human form, he may also be seen in several other representations. He used to take the form of the goose thus acquiring the epithet “the Great Cackler”. He is sometimes seen as a man with the head of the frog, uraeus or cobra. As a snake, he could regenerate himself by shedding his skin. He is also seen as a man with head of the ram or simply just as ram because at some point he was a god of fertility. He may also be seen as lion crouching by the throne or an ape or even a crocodile. During the Ptolemaic Period, he is depicted as a man with four arms, the body of a beetle, the wings of the hawk, the legs of a human, and the paws of a lion.

Amun is believed to be a self-created god. His first wife was named Wosret but later married Amaunet and Mut. With Mut, he sired a son named Khonsu, the god of the moon. He was originally a deity of local importance in Thebes as a creative force. He rose to prominence when he assimilated another Theban god Montu, the deity of war in the Eleventh dynasty. He became the principal god of the city. During the Middle Kingdom, he rose to national importance when the Theban chief Ahmose I expelled Hyskos from the country. The royal family, in honor of the deity, built several temples to his name – the most prominent of which are the Luxor Temple and the Great Temple in Karnak.

During the New Kingdom, Egypt came close to being a monotheistic state with Amun at the center of attraction. Amun was adopted into the Ennead cosmogony. He and the sun god, Ra, became the hybrid god Amun-Ra. Amun-Ra was thought of as the father and protector of all the pharaohs of Egypt since then. His cult was responsible for the rising role of the women in the society – they wielded great powers and held positions of authority and responsibility. Queen Ahmose Nefertari, for example, was granted the title the “God’s Wife of Amun” – an epithet given to the wife of the pharaoh in acknowledgment of her role and position in the state religion of Amun. The pharaoh Hatshepsut even claimed that her mother was impregnated by Amun in the guise of Pharaoh Thutmoses II

His cult spread further even to neighboring states and countries particularly Nubia. Amun-Ra became the principal deity of Napata during the twenty-fifth dynasty. The people there believed he was Gebel Barkal. By this time, he was considered an equivalent of Zeus by the Greeks.

One of the grandest festivals in ancient Egypt is the Opet Festival. Here, the statue of Amun traverses in the route of the Nile from his temples in Luxor to Karnak in celebration of his marriage to Mut. This festival epitomizes his role in procreation as the “Ka-mut-ef” or the “bull of his mother”.

To date, he and Osiris are one of the most chronicled male deities especially in relics and tablets both of which were referred to as the King of Gods.

 

Source:

Egyptian Gods and Goddesses

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As The Wheel Turns ~ Legends and Lore for November 24

Dragon Comments & Graphics

As The Wheel Turns ~ Legends and Lore for November 24

Feast of Burning Lamps in Egypt for Isis and Osiris.

International Protest Against War Toys Day.

Festival Of Silence.

Guru Tegh Bahadur Martyrdom – Sikh Lion Day

Japan: Tori-no-Ichi – Bamboo rakes decorated with symbols of good fortune are carried through the streets in order to attract benevolent spirits

In Japan, the annual festival known as Tori-No-Ichi takes place on or around this date. Traditionally, special bamboo rakes decorated with symbols of good fortune are carried through the streets in order to attract benevolent spirits.

In ancient Egypt, the sacred Goddesses of Light and Birth were honored and invoked annually on or around this day with prayers, libations, and the ritual burning of special lamps.

11/27 U.S. Thanksgiving. Give thanks for the bounty of the harvest and bless native peoples everywhere.

Remember the ancient ways and keep them sacred!
•           •           •           •

Live each Season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each.
~Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862)
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NOTE: Because of the large number of ancient calendars, many in simultaneous use, as well as different ways of computing holy days (marked by the annual inundation, the solar year, the lunar month, the rising of key stars, and other celestial and terrestrial events), you may find these holy days celebrated a few days earlier or later at your local temple.

Courtesy of Granny Moon’s Morning Feast

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Deities of Ancient Egypt

Deities of Ancient Egypt

The gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt were a complex group of beings and ideas. As the culture evolved, so did many of the deities and what they represented. Here are some of the best-known gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt.

•Anubis, God of Funerals and Embalming

Anubis is known as being a jackal-headed god of the dead, but he plays a significant role in the tale of Isis and Osiris. Find out why Anubis was important to the ancient Egyptians.

•Bast, the Cat Goddess

In ancient Egypt, cats were often worshipped as deities, Bast was one of the most highly honored feline gods. Also called Bastet, she was a goddess of sex and fertility. Originally, she was portrayed as a lioness, but was sometimes portrayed with kittens beside her, as an homage to her role as a goddess of fertility.

•Geb, God of Earth

In the ancient Egyptian religion, Geb is known as the god of the earth and is the first king of Egypt. He is often portrayed lying beneath the sky goddess, Nut. In his role as a god of earth, he is a fertility deity. Plants grow within his body, the dead are imprisoned inside him, and earthquakes are his laughter. He is more than a god of the surface of the earth – in fact, he is a god of everything contained within the earth.

•Hathor, Patron of Women

In Egyptian religion, Hathor was a predynastic goddess who embodied femininity, love and the joy of motherhood. In addition to being a symbol of fertility, she was known as a goddess of the underworld, in that she welcomed the newly departed to the West

•Isis, Mother Goddess

Originally a funerary goddess, Isis was the lover of Osiris. After his death, she used her magic to resurrect him. Isis is honored for her role as the mother of Horus, one of Egypt’s most powerful gods. She was also the divine mother of every pharoah of Egypt, and ultimately of Egypt itself.

•Ma’at, Goddess of Truth and Balance

Maat is the Egyptian goddess of truth and justice. She is married to Thoth, and is the daughter of Ra, the sun god. In addition to truth, she embodies harmony, balance and divine order. In Egyptian legends, it is Maat who steps in after the universe is created, and brings harmony amidst the chaos and disorder.

•Osiris, King of Egyptian Gods

Osiris was the son of earth and sky, and beloved of Isis. He is known as the god who taught mankind the secrets of civilization. Today, he is honored by some Pagans as a god of the underworld and of the harvest.

•Ra, the Sun God

Ra was the ruler of the heavens. He was the god of the sun, the bringer of light, and patron to the pharaohs. According to legend, the sun travels the skies as Ra drives his chariot through the heavens. Although he originally was associated only with the midday sun, as time went by, Ra became connected to the sun’s presence all day long.

•Taweret, Guardian of Fertility

Taweret was an Egyptian goddess of childbirth and fertility – but for a while, she was considered a demon. Associated with the hippopotomus, Taweret is a goddess who watches over and protects women in labor and their new babies.

•Thoth, God of Magic and Wisdom

Thoth was an Egyptian god who spoke as the tongue of Ra. Find out what’s special about this ibis-headed deity of ancient Egypt, and how he factors in to the story of Isis and Osiris.

 Source:

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As the Wheel Turns – Legends and Lore for September 22


Mabon Comments & Graphics

As the Wheel Turns – Legends and Lore for September 22

 

 Autumn Equinox or Harvest Home: From sundown. Also known as Mabon, Alban Elfred, or Winter Finding, the Autumn Equinox is one of two times of equilibrium — when the hours of day and night are matched — on the great Wheel of the Year.

 

 Autumnal Equinox; Death of the Goddess Tiamat – Study the lore of dragons (Tiamat’s animal form). Burn blue candles for Her sky and sea aspects.

 

 Slavic Pagan celebrate Svarog’s Holiday in their month of Ruen. This is the day honoring Svarog, the God of Fire and the Sky, a day to drink mead and celebrate. In ancient Egypt (Kemet), they celebrated the Feast of Divine Life in honor of the Moon and the life-giving waters which came from it by sacrificing a pig. This was also the time of the Ritual of the Netjeru of the Two Lands. The Inca celebrate the Coya Rayni festival honoring the Moon Goddess Quilla, focusing on purging sickness and evil.

 

(Southern Hemisphere) The Spring or Vernal Equinox, also called the Festival of Trees, Alban Eilir, Ostara, and the Rites of Eostre. The great fertility celebration of the birth of Spring and the reawakening of life from the Earth is the origin of many of the traditions surrounding the Christian holiday of Easter.

 

1692: Salem, Massachusetts. In memory of Mary Easty, Alice Parker, Ann Pudeator, Margaret Scott, Wilmot Redd, and Samuel Wardwell, hanged for witchcraft.

 

 NOTE: Because of the large number of ancient calendars, many in simultaneous use, as well as different ways of computing holy days (marked by the annual inundation, the solar year, the lunar month, the rising of key stars, and other celestial and terrestrial events), you may find these holy days celebrated a few days earlier or later at your local temple.  

 

 Live each Season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each. ~Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862)

Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast

 

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