Posts Tagged With: American Civil War

Celebrating Spirituality 365 days a Year – Memorial Day

Celebrating Spirituality 365 days a Year

May 30th

Memorial Day

The origins of Memorial Day, or Decoration Day, as it was first known, are remote and mixed. In rural America, the custom of cleaning the cemeteries and decorating graves was an occasion for reunions and picnics. It is possible that this legal holiday grew from the more ancient and widespread festivals of the dead, such as that of the Japanese Obon or Festival of Lanterns when the graves of ancestors are ritually cleaned and decorated. Historically, it seems that Memorial Day grew up almost spontaneously from a need to pay homage to the dead, especially those who gave of their lives in a patriotic fashion.

General order No. 1 1 from General John A Logan, dated May 5, 1868, begins: The 30th of May 1868 is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion…. In 1966 by Congressional resolution and presidential proclamation Waterloo, New York, was designated the “birthplace” of Memorial Day.”

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4 Dangerous Drugs Doctors Gave Your Grandparents

4 Dangerous Drugs Doctors Gave Your Grandparents

Written by Randy Fritz, co-creator with Diana Herrington at Real Food for Life

Many of the drugs that we know are illegal and dangerous, like heroin, were  once easily bought at the corner drugstore and recommended by doctors. When you  see the old advertisements for these substances, sometimes you cringe, and  sometimes you can’t help but laugh!

This is why I am cautious with any “new” health advance that has not yet  stood the test of time. I will explain more on this later.

Many of the medicines of the 19th and early 20th century contained  psychoactive drugs – alcohol, opium, and cocaine. Doctors didn’t know how these  drugs worked but they gave some small relief since you were actually slightly  high or drunk. Meanwhile nature took it’s course and if it could, the body  naturally healed as it would have anyway without the medicine.

1.  Heroin

 

The German company Bayer, which now produces one of the most popular pain  medications on earth, aspirin, also developed heroin and sold it at your local  drugstore.

In fact, when a chemist first developed ASA (aspirin) and presented it to  Bayer, management was not interested right away.  They were more excited  with another drug they had rediscovered – diacetylmorphine. They trademarked  this drug “heroin” because early testers said it made them feel heroisch (a  German word for heroic).

Heroin was marketed as a non-addictive morphine substitute  and cough suppressant. Medicines containing “smack” were sold  in stores just as aspirin is today. The American Medical Association gave heroin  its stamp of approval in 1907.

According to a Bayer watchdog group, Bayer promoted heroin for use in  children suffering from coughs, colds and “irritation”  as late as 1912.

Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Syrup contained 65 mg of morphine, another opiate  analgesic, per fluid ounce and was used “for children teething.”

This seems amazing to us now because we know so much more, but people somehow  survived! The body is amazing.

Natural Alternatives:

For coughs:  Honey and finely ground black pepper is a time tested  ayurvedic remedy for cough and sore throat used for  centuries.

For colds: Many powerfoods are rich in antioxidants  necessary to prevent colds and infections before they happen. They also support  the immune system once you have a cold. There are many examples:

  • Broccoli: is a rich source of the premier antioxidant  nutrient—vitamin C,  plus the flavonoids that allow vitamin C to recycle  effectively, plus carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta-carotene,  other powerful antioxidants.
  • All alkaline foods: create balance in the body.  An  acidid body is an inflamed, unsettled body with unbalanced immunity.  Alkaline-forming foods include lemons, spinach, zucchini, watermelon, millet, almonds, and raspberries and even weeds like dandelions. Each one of these foods offers a host of  powerful health benefits which you can enjoy with no long list of side  effects.

2. Cocaine

In the US, cocaine was sold over the counter until 1914 and was commonly  found in products like toothache drops, dandruff remedies, and medicinal  tonics.

Coca leaves, which can be transformed into the more concentrated cocaine,  have been used for centuries in native cultures in South America for day to day  remedies and religious ceremonies.

In America and Europe, the coca leaves were combined with wine “to invigorate  the mind and decrease depression and sleepiness.” It was suggested that you  should take a full glass with or after every meal. Children should only take  half a glass.

Coca-Cola was invented in the late 1800s as a “coca wine,”  but the alcohol and cocaine were later replaced with syrup and coca leaves,  respectively.

It was considered “a valuable brain tonic, and a cure for all nervous  affections — sick head-ache, neuralgia, hysteria, melancholy.”

Natural alternatives for energy and mental  clarity:

Green tea: the second most popular beverage  on earth enlivens the body, mind,  and spirit without overstimulating it. It  also helps with weight loss, cancer and heart disease,

All fruits are smart carbs and thus contain natural sugars for  energy, but are full of the micronutrients which actually make you smarter and  balanced instead of just high on white sugar and chemicals.

3.  Opium

Opium poppy seed (from which heroin is processed) has been cultivated for  food, anesthesia, and ritual purposes since at least the new stone age.

In the 18th century, opium was found to be a good remedy for nervous  disorders: to quiet the mind, help the insane, and to treat insomnia.  In  the American Civil War, the Union Army used 2.8 million ounces of opium  tincture and powder and about 500,000 opium pills. It was called “God’s Own  Medicine.”

Until 1970, Paregoric, whose main ingredient was powdered opium, could be  purchased at a pharmacy without a medical prescription.

4.  Cigarettes

Cigarettes with unknown contents claimed to provide temporary relief for  everything from asthma to colds, canker sores, and bad  breath. They were “not recommended for children under 6.” As the effects of  nicotine became more apparent, cigarette companies had to be more subtle in  their marketing.

During World War II, soldiers were issued free cigarettes, courtesy of the  tobacco companies, resulting in millions of nicotine-addicted G.I.s returning home after the  war.

Natural approaches to asthma:

Asthma is primarily an inflammatory condition so any whole foods that  decreases inflammation helps.

Studies have shown that intakes of apples, tomatoes, carrots, green leafy vegetables and generally lots of fresh  fruit and vegetables reduces the prevalence of asthma.

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation and asthma. Omega-3s are found in  flax seeds, walnuts, beans and winter squash. Each of these foods have amazing additional  benefits – again without side effects.

But We Know Better Now, Don’t We?

We certainly have come a long way since the era of patent medicines. Our  understanding of how chemistry interacts with our bodies is increasing daily.  But is it far enough?  Future generations may well laugh at our present day  advertisements for Viagra and sleep medication and we already cringe at the  destructive effects of chemotherapy and radiation.

I don’t want to pick on any doctors specifically or in general. They just  tend to represent (sometimes unknowingly) the established medical and  pharmaceutical industries.

Sometimes the same thing happens in the natural health field; new discoveries  which at the beginning sound like the cure for everything turn out to be not  appropriate for everyone and in some cases are even harmful.

As I said before though, I am very cautious of any new discovery that has not  been verified by time. By “time” I don’t mean months or years of testing but  rather decades or centuries of use!

At Real Food For Life, we understand that peak health has been enjoyed by  millions over the centuries using only simple whole foods traditional in their  culture. We call these power  foods and they are probably in your kitchen right now.

It is up to us to take responsibility for our own health and educate  ourselves. We can’t expect a government organization to do it all for us.

This is what many of the people are doing within Care2: learning and sharing  and participating. We congratulate you on your efforts.

I’m sure you know of other deadly medications and procedures that have been  offered to the public.

 

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Create a Memorial Garden

 

by Judi Gerber

For many people, Memorial Day is just another day off, and is seen as little more than the unofficial start of summer and a great day to barbecue. But, the real purpose of the day is to remember those who have died in service to the United States.

If you are looking for a way to truly observe Memorial Day, you can visit a cemetery and place some of your homegrown flowers on the graves of fallen soldiers. Or, if you aren’t a gardener, but are equally concerned about the negative environmental impacts of conventional flowers, buy organic flowers.

A more lasting remembrance is to plant a tree, or even a garden, in memory of a lost loved one or other service members. As I have written about before, giving somebody the gift of a garden is one of the most memorable things that you can do. This is all the more true if you create a “memorial” garden either in remembrance or in honor of someone.

Aside from remembering those we have lost, there are some things we can do to help the thousands of men and women now serving. For example, are you a gardener? Do you want to make a difference? Then why not put your green thumb to use. For service members that are deployed, consider “adopting” their garden while they are gone. You can even involve his or her family in the care of the garden. Not only will they benefit from beautiful flowers and delicious food, but working in the garden is therapeutic and can help them deal with the stress that comes with the deployment of their loved one.

Not only can you take care of their garden for them, but, if you incorporate edibles, when it comes time to harvest, you can donate that produce to a local veteran’s agency or hospital, or to other military families whose loved one is also deployed.

You can also create a cut flower garden and give the flowers to the same veteran’s organizations. Or, you can go and regularly place them on military grave sites and deliver bouquets to other military families as well.

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Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

United States Department of Veterans Affairs

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This Day In History, Friday, April 27th

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A Timeline Of Events That Occurred On This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

April 27

1296   Edward I defeats the Scots at the Battle of Dunbar.
1509   Pope Julius II excommunicates the Italian state of Venice.
1565   The first Spanish settlement in Philippines is established in Cebu City.
1773   British Parliament passes the Tea Act.
1746   King George II wins the battle of Culloden.
1813   American forces capture York (present-day Toronto), the seat of government in Ontario.
1861   President Abraham Lincoln suspends the writ of habeas corpus.
1861   West Virginia secedes from Virginia after Virginia secedes from the Union.
1863   The Army of the Potomac begins marching on Chancellorsville.
1865   The Sultana, a steam-powered riverboat, catches fire and burns after one of its boilers explodes. At least 1,238 of the 2,031 passengers–mostly former Union POWs–are killed.
1909   The Sultan of Turkey, Abdul Hamid II, is overthrown.
1937   German bombers of the Condor Legion devastate Guernica, Spain.
1941   The Greek army capitulates to the invading Germans.
1950   South Africa passes the Group Areas Act, formally segregating races.
1961   The United Kingdom grants Sierra Leone independence.
1975   Saigon is encircled by North Vietnamese troops.
1978   The Afghanistan revolution begins.
1989   Protesting students take over Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China.
Born on April 27
1737   Edward Gibbon, historian (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire).
1791   Samuel F.B. Morse, inventor of the telegraph and the code.
1822   Ulysses S. Grant, Union general during the American Civil War, 18th President of the United States (1869-1877).
1840   Edward Whymper, the first man to climb the Matterhorn.
1900   Walter Lantz, cartoonist, creator of Woody Woodpecker.
1904   Cecil Day-Lewis, Irish poet, father of actor Daniel Day-Lewis.
1927   Coretta Scott King, civil rights activist, wife of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Historynet.com

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On this day…

On this day…

May 31: World No Tobacco Day; Feast of the Visitation in Roman Catholicism and Anglicanism

MV Mavi Marmara

  • 1279 BC – According to estimates accepted by most Egyptologists today, Ramesses II became Pharaoh of Egypt.
  • 1223 – Mongol invasions: Mongol forces defeated a combined army of Kiev, Galich, and the Cumans on the banks of the Kalchik River in present-day Ukraine.
  • 1862 – American Civil War: Confederate forces under Joseph E. Johnston and G. W. Smith engaged Union forces under George B. McClellan at the Battle of Seven Pines outside Richmond, Virginia.
  • 1981 – An organized mob of police and government-sponsored paramilitias began burning the public library in Jaffna, Sri Lanka, destroying over 97,000 items in one of the most violent examples of ethnic biblioclasm of the 20th century.
  • 2010 – During an attempt to break the ongoing blockade of the Gaza Strip, the Israeli Navy engaged in armed conflict with the crew of the MV Mavi Marmara (pictured), resulting in nine civilian deaths.
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