Witchcraft

WOTC Extra – How to Do the Rooting Ritual

Dragon on Top of the Mountain

How to Do the Rooting Ritual

 

Rooting is a great ritual for flowing Earth energies deep into the ground, releasing excess energies of any kind, pulling Earth energies into the body and mineralizing the body. To perform this ritual, follow these instructions:

1. Place your palms or heels on the ground. These are the parts of your body from which you will extend “roots.”

2. Extend your roots out of your body, through the carpet or tile, into the sub floor and down into the Earth. Just imagine or “see” roots growing from your palms or heels and reaching into the Earth. If you are in a multi-level building, you will need to go through each level until you reach the Earth. If you are wearing shoes with thick soles, you may have to extend the roots out the sides of your shoes to avoid the soles.

3. Once your roots reach the Earth, keep extending them down through the topsoil and deeper layers until you reach bedrock. You will feel the bedrock as a more solid sensation than burrowing through the soil.

4. When you reach bedrock, dig your roots in, and lock them in.

5. With each exhalation, push excess tension, anger, frustration, sadness, distraction, or other unwanted energies through your roots into the bedrock. The Earth will easily accept these energies.

6. With each inhaled breath, pull up minerals and energies from the Earth for stability and balance.

7. Once you feel relaxed and nourished, pull your roots back up into your body. Just see the roots retracting and going back into your body. If you stand up without pulling in your roots, you will feel a slight “popping” sensation, and your body might be sore for a few days.

8. This is a very simple but highly useful magic ritual during times like these. If you are under a great deal of stress, do this ritual at least once per day to relieve daily tension and negativity.

Enjoy the relaxing sensations of connecting with Mother Earth. Don’t worry about affecting the Earth negatively— she can handle any and all kinds of energies!

 

 

Learn How to Do Witchcraft Rituals and Spells with Your Bare Hands

Alan G. Joel

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Ritual Working, Spellcrafting, Wicca, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

Let’s Talk Witch – The Magic Ritual of Getting Grounded

dragon fantasy globe

The Magic Ritual of Getting Grounded

 

One of the best ways to weather the ups-and-downs of the current world change is to practice rituals that connect you with Mother Earth. These are rituals that ground you into the Earth, and they work because the Earth is huge and absorbs just about anything you throw at it. Any magic ritual that grounds you, and connects you with the element Earth, will help you weather the storm. Now why is this? Because there are already a lot of Air, Fire, and Water energies zinging around, and these combined energies can often lead to fear, reactivity, negativity, and other junky emotions. Magically, these three elements represent the following:

Air

Thinking, planning, and communication. In a highly-charged situation, this could lead to arguments, negative thoughts, or plans for revenge.

Fire

Movement, action, desire, and will. If you are stressed, increasing your Fire energy by doing a Fire-based magic ritual could lead to road rage, frenetic but useless action, or a fist-fight.

Water

Emotions, feelings, and the language of Spirit. If you already feel down about your situation, doing a magic ritual that is too Watery can make you feel even sadder, triggering negative emotions.

For all of these reasons, rooting rituals that ground you and connect you with Mother Earth are definitely useful during these topsy-turvy world changes!

 

 

Learn How to Do Witchcraft Rituals and Spells with Your Bare Hands

Alan G. Joel

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Ritual Working, Spellcrafting, Wicca, Witchcraft | Tags: , | Leave a comment

How To Cast a Circle – Solitary Style

 

Egyptian Comments & Graphics

How To Cast a Circle – Solitary Style

 

In modern Paganism, one of the facets common to many traditions is the use of a circle as a sacred space. While other religions rely on the use of a building such as a church or temple to hold worship, Wiccans and Pagans can cast a circle pretty much any place they choose. This is particularly handy on those pleasant summer evenings when you decide to hold ritual out in the back yard under a tree instead of in your living room!

Bear in mind that not every Pagan tradition casts a circle – many Reconstructionist paths skip it altogether, as do most folk magic traditions.

Start by determining how big your space needs to be. A ceremonial circle is a place in which positive energy and power are kept in, and negative energy kept out. The size of your circle will depend on how many people need to be inside it, and what the circle’s purpose is. If you’re hosting a small coven meeting for a few people, a nine-foot-diameter circle is sufficient. On the other hand, if it’s Beltane and you’ve got four dozen Pagans preparing to do a Spiral Dance or a drum circle, you’ll need a space significantly larger. A solitary practitioner can work easily in a three- to five-foot circle.

Figure out where your Circle should be cast. In some traditions, a Circle is physically marked on the ground, while in others it is merely visualized by each member of the group. If you have an indoor ritual space, you can mark the Circle on the carpet. Do whichever your tradition calls for. Once the Circle is designated, it is usually navigated by the High Priest or High Priestess, holding an athame, a candle, or a censer.

Which direction will your circle face? The circle is almost always oriented to the four cardinal points, with a candle or other marker placed at the north, east, south and west and the altar in the center with all the necessary tools for the ritual. Before entering the circle, participants are purified as well.

How do you actually cast the circle? Methods of casting the circle vary from one tradition to another. In some forms of Wicca, the God and Goddess are called upon to share the ritual. In others, the Hight Priest (HP) or High Priestess (HPs) will begin at the north and call upon the deities of the tradition from each direction. Usually this invocation includes a mention of the aspects associated with that direction – emotion, intellect, strength, etc. Non-Wiccan Pagan traditions sometimes use a different format. A sample ritual for casting a circle might take place like this:

Mark the circle upon the floor or the ground. Place a candle in each of the four quarters – green to the North to represent Earth, yellow in the East to represent Air, red or orange symbolizing Fire in the South, and blue to the West in association with Water. All necessary magical tools should already be in place upon the altar in the center. Let’s assume that the group, called Three Circles Coven, is led by a High Priestess.

The HPs enters the circle from the east and announces, “Let it be known that the circle is about to be cast. All who enter the Circle may do so in perfect love and perfect trust.” Other members of the group may wait outside the circle until the casting is complete. The HPs moves clockwise around the circle, carrying a lit candle (if it’s more practical, use a lighter instead). At each of the four cardinal points, she calls upon the Deities of her tradition (some may refer to these as Watchtowers, or Guardians).

As she lights the candle in the East from the one she carries, the HPs says:

Guardians of the East, I call upon you to watch over the rites of Three Circles Coven. Powers of knowledge and wisdom, guided by Air, we ask that you keep watch over us tonight within this circle. Let all who enter the circle under your guidance do so in perfect love and perfect trust.

The HPs moves to the South, and lights the red or orange candle, saying:

Guardians of the South, I call upon you to watch over the rites of Three Circles Coven. Powers of energy and will, guided by Fire, we ask that you keep watch over us tonight within this circle. Let all who enter the circle under your guidance do so in perfect love and perfect trust.

Next, she circles around to the West, where she lights the blue candle and says:

Guardians of the West, I call upon you to watch over the rites of Three Circles Coven. Powers of passion and emotion, guided by Water, we ask that you keep watch over us tonight within this circle. Let all who enter the circle under your guidance do so in perfect love and perfect trust.

Finally, the HPs goes to the last candle in the North. When lighting it, she says:

Guardians of the North, I call upon you to watch over the rites of Three Circles Coven. Powers of endurance and strength, guided by Earth, we ask that you keep watch over us tonight within this circle. Let all who enter the circle under your guidance do so in perfect love and perfect trust.

At this point, the HPs will announce that the circle is cast, and other members of the group can ritually enter the circle. Each person approaches the HPs, who will ask:

How do you enter the circle?

Each individual will respond:

In perfect love and perfect trust or In the light and love of the Goddess or whatever response is appropriate to your tradition.

Once all members are present within the circle, the circle is closed. At no time during ritual should anyone exit the circle without performing a ceremonial “cutting.” To do this, hold your athame in your hand and make a cutting motion across the line of the circle, first to your right and then to your left. You are essentially creating a “door” in the circle, which you may now walk through. When you return to the circle, enter it in the same place you exited, and “close” the doorway by reconnecting the line of the circle with the athame.

When the ceremony or rite has ended, the circle is usually cleared in the same manner in which it was cast, only in this case the HPs will dismiss the deities or Guardians and thank them for watching over the coven. In some traditions, the temple is cleared simply by having all members raise their athames in salute, thanking the God or Goddess, and kissing the blades of the athame.

If the above method of casting a circle seems boring or dull to you, that’s okay. It’s a basic framework for ritual, and you can make yours as elaborate as you like. If you’re a very poetic person who likes lots of ceremony, feel free to use creative license – call upon “the weavers of the wind, the breezes that blow from the East, blessing us with wisdom and knowledge, so mote it be,” etc, etc. If your tradition associates various deities with the directions, call upon those Gods or Goddesses in the ways that they expect you to do so. Just make sure that you don’t spend so much time casting the Circle that you don’t have any time left for the rest of your ceremony!

Tips:

Have all your tools ready ahead of time — this will save you from scrambling around during the middle of the ritual looking for things!

If you forget what you mean to say when casting the circle, improvise. Talking to your deities should come from the heart.

If you make a mistake, don’t sweat it. The universe has a pretty good sense of humor, and we mortals are fallible.

What You Need:

Athame

Candles

Censer

Other tools of your tradition

 

 

By Patti Wigington

Article found on & owned by About.com

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Ritual Working, Spellcrafting, Wicca, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

WOTC Extra – 5 Tips for Solitary Pagans


Egyptian Comments & Graphics

5 Tips for Solitary Pagans

 

In many modern Pagan belief systems, there are far more people who practice as solitaries than there are people who have joined covens or established traditions. Why is this? It’s partly because most people who want to learn about Paganism develop the interest long before they meet a coven or trad that they’re interested in joining. It’s also because even if you decide you want to be part of a coven or group, it’s not always easy to find one. Wiccan covens and Pagan groups don’t exactly have a listing in the Yellow Pages, so you may have five covens right up the street from you, and you’d never know it.

Certainly, practicing as a solitary can have its rewards. After all, you can make your own guidelines and follow your own set of ethics. Worship can be done at your convenience, rather than according to a schedule dictated by others. As a solitary, you’re really under no obligation to anyone but yourself and your gods. Many people spend their entire lives practicing as solitaries, and never feel a need to join a coven or group.

Occasionally, you may find some drawbacks to practicing as a solitary Pagan or Wiccan. You might sometimes feel alone, like you have no one to network with or share ideas with. You may at some point feel like you’ve stagnated — it’s hard to figure out what the next step is if you don’t have someone to compare notes. Sometimes, it’s nice to just get feedback from like-minded people — someone who can help you when you’re wondering about what to do.

If you’ve decided to practice as a solitary — either temporarily, or in the long-term — here are some tips on how to have a successful experience:

  1. Try to establish a daily routine. It’s easy to let your studies go by the wayside if you’re all by yourself, so establishing a daily routine will help you keep on task. Whether your routine includes meditation, reading, ritual work, or whatever, try to do something each day that helps you work towards achieving your spiritual studies.
  2. Write things down. Many people choose to keep a Book of Shadows, or BOS, to chronicle their magical studies. This is important for a variety of reasons. First, it allows you to document what you’ve tried and done, as well as what works and doesn’t work for you. Secondly, by writing down your rituals, prayers, or spellwork, you’re laying the foundation for your tradition. You can go back and repeat things that you find to be useful later one. Finally, it’s important to keep track of what you do magically and spiritually because as people, we evolve. The person you are now is not the same person you were ten years ago, and it’s healthy for us to be able to look back and see where we were, and how far we’ve come.
  3. Get out and meet people. Just because you’ve chosen to practice as a solitary doesn’t mean you should never come into contact with other Pagans or Wiccans. Most metropolitan areas — and a lot of smaller communities — have informal Pagan groups that get together regularly. This offers solitaries a chance to network and chat with each other, without having to form specific organized groups. Take advantage of resources like Witchvox and Meetup to see what’s in your area. If there’s nothing around you, consider starting a study group of your own for like-minded folks.
  4. Ask questions. Let’s face it, we all need to start somewhere. If your read or hear something and you want to know more about it, ask. If something isn’t clear, or contradicts something you’ve already read, ask. Don’t accept everything at face value, and remember that just because one person had a particular experience doesn’t mean that you’ll have an identical experience. Also, keep in mind that just because you read something in a book doesn’t necessarily mean it’s valid — learn to ask whether a resource is worth using or not. Don’t be afraid to be a skeptic sometimes.
  5. Don’t ever stop learning. Ask other people in the Pagan community — either online, or in real life — for recommendations about books and other resources. If you read a book that you enjoy, check the back for a bibliography and see what other books that author suggests. Remember that learning can take place by reading, but it can also develop from personal experience, and from speaking with other people involved in Paganism.

 

 

By Patti Wigington

Article found on & owned by About.com

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Witch, Witchcraft | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Let’s Talk Witch – Practicing as a Solitary Pagan


Egyptian Comments & Graphics

Practicing as a Solitary Pagan

Many contemporary Wiccans and other Pagans find that rather than joining a group, they prefer practicing as a solitary. The reasons for this as are as varied as those who walk the path – some may find that they work better by themselves, while others who wish to join a coven may be limited by geography or family and job obligations. Regardless, there are a number of things to keep in mind if you’re.

Covens vs. Solitaries

For some people, it’s hard to make the decision to practice as a solitary. For others, it’s a no-brainer. Both methods have their benefits, and you can always change your mind if you find that one isn’t working for you. Some of the advantages of practicing as a solitary Pagan include setting your own schedule, working at your own pace, and not having to deal with the dynamics of coven relationships. The downside, of course, is that you’re working alone, and at some point, you may find yourself wishing you had someone to tell you where to go and what to do next in order to expand your knowledge.

How Do I Practice?

The first thing many people wonder is “How do I practice as a solitary?” After all, you’ve got no one to suggest rituals and practice to you, no one to ask if you don’t understand. So what do you do? One of the best things to do to develop as successful practice as a solitary

Pagan is to form a routine – doing things the same way each time is really the foundation of ritual, and is a good habit to get into. Also, try networking – attending public Pagan events may be just the thing for someone who wants to meet other Pagans and Wiccans, but doesn’t want (or need) the commitment of joining an established group. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it. There are plenty of people out there, both in your “real world” life and on the Internet. You’re always welcome to visit the About Pagan/Wiccan forums if you’ve got something you’d like to ask about, or if you just want to communicate with some new people.

Eclectic Practice

If you’ve decided that practicing as a solitary Pagan is the right path for you, you may find you work best not with a structured system of belief and practice, but by developing things on your own. This is fine – many people create and enhance their own traditions, taking what they need from other, established traditions, and blending it together to create a brand new system of belief. Eclectic Wicca is an all-purpose term applied to NeoWiccan traditions that don’t fit into any specific definitive category. Many solitary Wiccans follow an eclectic path, but there are also covens that consider themselves eclectic. A coven or individual may use the term “eclectic” for a variety of reasons.

Self Dedication

One of the benchmarks for many people involved in the Pagan community is the initiation ritual – it’s a ceremony that marks us as belonging to something, as being part of a community, a coven, or some fellowship that we have not known before. It’s also, in many cases, a time to formally declare ourselves to the gods of our traditions. By the very definition of the word, however, one cannot self-initiate, because “initiate” is something that must include two people. Many solitaries find instead that a self-dedication ritual fills that need perfectly – it’s a way of making a commitment to one’s spiritual growth, to the deities we honor, and to learning and finding our way.

Never Stop Learning

If you’re practicing as a solitary Pagan, it’s easy to fall into the trap of “I’ve read all my books.” Don’t ever stop learning – once you’ve read all your books, go find some new ones. Borrow them from the library, buy them (used if you prefer), or check them out online from reputable sources like Sacred Texts or Project Gutenberg. If there’s a particular subject you’re interested in, read about it. Keep expanding your knowledge base, and you’ll be able to continue and grow spiritually.

Celebrating with Ritual

When it comes to celebrating rituals, the ceremonies on this site are typically designed so that they can be adapted either for a group celebration or a solitary ritual. Browse the listings for the various Sabbat rituals, find the rite you want to perform, and tweak it to meet your needs. Once you feel comfortable with ritual practice, try writing your own! Planning and Creating a Ritual

 

By Patti Wigington

Article found on & owned by About.com

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Witch, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

WOTC Extra – 5 Tips for Solitary Pagans

 5 Tips for Solitary Pagans

 

In many modern Pagan belief systems, there are far more people who practice as solitaries than there are people who have joined covens or established traditions. Why is this? It’s partly because most people who want to learn about Paganism develop the interest long before they meet a coven or trad that they’re interested in joining. It’s also because even if you decide you want to be part of a coven or group, it’s not always easy to find one. Wiccan covens and Pagan groups don’t exactly have a listing in the Yellow Pages, so you may have five covens right up the street from you, and you’d never know it.

Certainly, practicing as a solitary can have its rewards. After all, you can make your own guidelines and follow your own set of ethics. Worship can be done at your convenience, rather than according to a schedule dictated by others. As a solitary, you’re really under no obligation to anyone but yourself and your gods. Many people spend their entire lives practicing as solitaries, and never feel a need to join a coven or group.

Occasionally, you may find some drawbacks to practicing as a solitary Pagan or Wiccan. You might sometimes feel alone, like you have no one to network with or share ideas with. You may at some point feel like you’ve stagnated — it’s hard to figure out what the next step is if you don’t have someone to compare notes. Sometimes, it’s nice to just get feedback from like-minded people — someone who can help you when you’re wondering about what to do.

If you’ve decided to practice as a solitary — either temporarily, or in the long-term — here are some tips on how to have a successful experience:

Try to establish a daily routine. It’s easy to let your studies go by the wayside if you’re all by yourself, so establishing a daily routine will help you keep on task. Whether your routine includes meditation, reading, ritual work, or whatever, try to do something each day that helps you work towards achieving your spiritual studies.

Write things down. Many people choose to keep a Book of Shadows, or BOS, to chronicle their magical studies. This is important for a variety of reasons. First, it allows you to document what you’ve tried and done, as well as what works and doesn’t work for you. Secondly, by writing down your rituals, prayers, or spellwork, you’re laying the foundation for your tradition. You can go back and repeat things that you find to be useful later one. Finally, it’s important to keep track of what you do magically and spiritually because as people, we evolve. The person you are now is not the same person you were ten years ago, and it’s healthy for us to be able to look back and see where we were, and how far we’ve come.

Get out and meet people. Just because you’ve chosen to practice as a solitary doesn’t mean you should never come into contact with other Pagans or Wiccans. Most metropolitan areas — and a lot of smaller communities — have informal Pagan groups that get together regularly. This offers solitaries a chance to network and chat with each other, without having to form specific organized groups. Take advantage of resources like Witchvox and Meetup to see what’s in your area. If there’s nothing around you, consider starting a study group of your own for like-minded folks.

Ask questions. Let’s face it, we all need to start somewhere. If your read or hear something and you want to know more about it, ask. If something isn’t clear, or contradicts something you’ve already read, ask. Don’t accept everything at face value, and remember that just because one person had a particular experience doesn’t mean that you’ll have an identical experience. Also, keep in mind that just because you read something in a book doesn’t necessarily mean it’s valid — learn to ask whether a resource is worth using or not. Don’t be afraid to be a skeptic sometimes.

Don’t ever stop learning. Ask other people in the Pagan community — either online, or in real life — for recommendations about books and other resources. If you read a book that you enjoy, check the back for a bibliography and see what other books that author suggests. Remember that learning can take place by reading, but it can also develop from personal experience, and from speaking with other people involved in Paganism.

 

 

By Patti Wigington

Article found on & owned by About.com

 

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

Let’s Talk Witch – Practicing as a Solitary Pagan

 

 

Practicing as a Solitary Pagan

 

Many contemporary Wiccans and other Pagans find that rather than joining a group, they prefer practicing as a solitary. The reasons for this as are as varied as those who walk the path some may find that they work better by themselves, while others who wish to join a coven may be limited by geography or family and job obligations. Regardless, there are a number of things to keep in mind if you’re

Covens vs. Solitaries

For some people, it’s hard to make the decision to practice as a solitary. For others, it’s a no-brainer. Both methods have their benefits, and you can always change your mind if you find that one isn’t working for you. Some of the advantages of practicing as a solitary Pagan include setting your own schedule, working at your own pace, and not having to deal with the dynamics of coven relationships. The downside, of course, is that you’re working alone, and at some point, you may find yourself wishing you had someone to tell you where to go and what to do next in order to expand your knowledge.

How Do I Practice?

The first thing many people wonder is “How do I practice as a solitary?” After all, you’ve got no one to suggest rituals and practice to you, no one to ask if you don’t understand. So what do you do? One of the best things to do to develop as successful practice as a solitary

Pagan is to form a routine doing things the same way each time is really the foundation of ritual, and is a good habit to get into. Also, try networking attending public Pagan events may be just the thing for someone who wants to meet other Pagans and Wiccans, but doesn’t want (or need) the commitment of joining an established group. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it. There are plenty of people out there, both in your “real world” life and on the Internet.

Eclectic Practice

If you’ve decided that practicing as a solitary Pagan is the right path for you, you may find you work best not with a structured system of belief and practice, but by developing things on your own. This is fine many people create and enhance their own traditions, taking what they need from other, established traditions, and blending it together to create a brand new system of belief. Eclectic Wicca is an all-purpose term applied to NeoWiccan traditions that don’t fit into any specific definitive category. Many solitary Wiccans follow an eclectic path, but there are also covens that consider themselves eclectic. A coven or individual may use the term “eclectic” for a variety of reasons.

Self Dedication

One of the benchmarks for many people involved in the Pagan community is the initiation ritual it’s a ceremony that marks us as belonging to something, as being part of a community, a coven, or some fellowship that we have not known before. It’s also, in many cases, a time to formally declare ourselves to the gods of our traditions. By the very definition of the word, however, one cannot self-initiate, because “initiate” is something that must include two people. Many solitaries find instead that a self-dedication ritual fills that need perfectly it’s a way of making a commitment to one’s spiritual growth, to the deities we honor, and to learning and finding our way.

Never Stop Learning

If you’re practicing as a solitary Pagan, it’s easy to fall into the trap of “I’ve read all my books.” Don’t ever stop learning once you’ve read all your books, go find some new ones. Borrow them from the library, buy them (used if you prefer), or check them out online from reputable sources like Sacred Texts or Project Gutenberg. If there’s a particular subject you’re interested in, read about it. Keep expanding your knowledge base, and you’ll be able to continue and grow spiritually.

Celebrating with Ritual

When it comes to celebrating rituals, the ceremonies on this site are typically designed so that they can be adapted either for a group celebration or a solitary ritual. Browse the listings for the various Sabbat rituals, find the rite you want to perform, and tweak it to meet your needs. Once you feel comfortable with ritual practice, try writing your own!

 

 

By Patti Wigington

Article found on & owned by About.com

 

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

WOTC Extra, Extra – How to Break a Hex or Curse


Fantasy Comments & Graphics

How to Break a Hex or Curse

One of the most popular articles on this site is one about magical self-defense and protection. In this piece, we discuss how to know if you are curse or hexed, and ways of protecting yourself to keep such things from taking place from the get-go. However, we also receive, on a pretty regular basis, emails from people who are positive they’re under magical attack already, and want to know how to break or lift the curse, hex, or spell that is causing them harm.

Be sure to read the Magical Self-Defense article before you continue on this one, because it does detail ways to determine if you are, in fact, under magical attack. In general, though, you should be able to answer ALL THREE of the following questions with a yes:

Is there someone in your life that you have angered or offended in some way?

Is that person someone who has the magical knowledge to place a harmful spell on you?

Is a hex or curse the only possible explanation for what is happening to you?

If the answer to all three is “yes”, then it’s possible you’ve been cursed or hexed. If that’s the case, then you may need to take protective measures.

There are a number of different ways to break a spell that is causing you harm, and those will vary depending on the guidelines and tenets of your tradition. However, the following methods are some of the most popular means of breaking a curse or hex.

Magic Mirrors

Remember when you were a child and you figured out that you could reflect sunlight at people with your mom’s hand mirror? A “magic mirror” works on the principal that anything reflected in it – including hostile intent – will be bounced back to the sender. This is especially effective if you know the identity of the person who is sending bad mojo your way.

There are several methods of creating a magic mirror. The first, and simplest, is to use a single mirror. First, consecrate the mirror like you would any other of your magical tools. Place the mirror, standing up, in a bowl of black salt, which is used in many hoodoo traditions to provide protection and repel negativity.

In the bowl, facing the mirror, place something that represents your target – the person who is cursing you. This can be a photo, a business card, a small doll, an item that they own, or even their name written on a piece of paper. This will reflect that individual’s negative energy back to them.

A similar technique is to create a mirror box. It works on the same principle as the single mirror, only you’ll use several mirrors to line the inside of a box, gluing them in place so they don’t move around. Once you’ve done so, place a magical link to the person inside the box, and then seal the box. You may use black salt if you wish to add a little more magical oomph.

In some folk magic traditions, the mirror box is created using shards of a mirror you’ve smashed with a hammer while chanting the person’s name. This is a great method to use – and smashing anything with a hammer is pretty therapeutic – but be careful you don’t cut yourself. Wear safety glasses if you opt for this approach.

Protective Poppets

Many people use poppets, or magical dolls, in spellwork as a tool of offense. You can create a poppet to represent people you’d like to heal or bring good fortune to, help find a job, or to protect. However, the poppet can also be used as a defensive tool.

Create a poppet to represent yourself – or whoever the victim of the curse is – and charge the poppet with the task of taking on the damage in your place. This is actually pretty simple. Follow the instructions on Poppet Construction, and once your poppet is done, tell it what it’s for.

I have made you, and your name is ______. You shall receive the negative energy sent by ______ in my place.”

Place the poppet someplace out of the way, and once you believe the curse’s effects are no longer effecting you, get rid of your poppet.

Folk Magic, Binding, and Talismans

There are a number of different methods of curse-breaking found in folk magic.

Take a purifying bath that includes a blend of hyssop, rue, salt and other protective herbs. Some people believe this will wash away the curse.

In some forms of rootwork, an “uncrossing” spell is performed, and often involves the recitation of the 37th Psalm. If you don’t feel comfortable saying a Psalm during spellwork, you can burn uncrossing incense, which is typically a blend of rue, hyssop, salt, sage and frankincense.

Create a spell-breaking talisman or amulet. This can be an existing item that you consecrate and charge, and ritually assign the task of repelling the curse, or it can be a piece of jewelry that you create specifically for this purpose.

Binding is a method of magically tying the hands of someone who is causing harm and discontent. Some popular methods of binding include creating a poppet in the person’s likeness and wrapping it with cord, creating a rune or sigil specifically to bind them from causing further harm, or a spell tablet restricting them from performing negative actions towards their victim.

 

By Patti Wigington

Article Found On & Owned By About.com

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

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