The Sabbats

To Bless The Dead (Samhain)

TO BLESS THE DEAD

 

On Halloween night, anoint a black candle with three drops of frankincense or myrrh oil (or a blend of the two) to consecrate it. Light the candle’s wick with a match, and say:

 

FLAME OF MAGICK,
COME TO LIFE.
IN THY POWER BE MOST RIFE!

 

Fill your mind with images of your deceased loved one. Take a black feather in your power hand and use it to trace the symbol of the pentagram in the air over the flame of the candle. Do this thrice, each time reciting the following incantation:

 
BLESSED BE MY (STATE RELATIONSHIP)DECEASED,
FROM EARTHLY CHAINS BE NOW RELEASED,
PAIN AND SORROW BE NOW CEASED,
MAY THY SPIRIT REST IN PEACE.
AS IT IS WILLED, SO MOTE IT BE.
 
 
Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich
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A Witch’s New Year Chant

A WITCH’S NEW YEAR CHANT

 

The following chant is designed for coven use; however, it can be easily adapted for solitaries simply by changing the words “we” and “our” to “I” and “my,” respectively. On the thirty-first of October (the eve of the witches’ New Year), join hands to form a circle around a glowing jack-o’-lantern. Concentrate upon your New Year’s resolutions while repeating the following chant over and over, each time a bit louder and stronger until sufficient magickal energy has been raised and you feel your body tingling:

 

SAMHAIN EVE,
WE CHANT, WE WEAVE
A WEB OF MAGICK FOR
TO CLEAVE.
SPELLS CONCEIVE,
IN LOVE BELIEVE,
OUR NEW YEAR’S GOALS
WE SHALL ACHIEVE!

 

Gradually lower the chant, and then end it with:

So mote it be!

Don’t forget to uncast the circle.

 

Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore 
Gerina Dunwich
Categories: Articles, Chants, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Leave a comment

The Pumpkin-of-Passion Love Spell (Samhain)

The Pumpkin-of-Passion Love Spell

 

To bring two people together in a romantic fashion, perform this amatory enchantment during the Venus hour on Halloween. Ancient occult tradition holds that the hours ruled by the planet Venus and under the influence of the Roman love Goddess after whom this planet is named are the ideal hours for casting love spells. They are also believed to be the appropriate times for brewing love potions (known as “philters” in ancient times), performing love divinations, and basically engaging in any form of magick relating to matters of the heart. The best time to perform these is during the planetary hours of Venus.

According to the ancient grimoire (textbook of magick) known as The Key of Solomon, the planetary hours of Venus for each day of the week are as follows:

SUNDAY: 2nd, 9th, 16th, and 23rd hour from sunrise.

MONDAY: 6th, 13th, and 20th hour from sunrise.

TUESDAY: 3rd, 10th, 17th, and 24th hour from sunrise.

WEDNESDAY: 7th, 14th, and 21st hour from sunrise.

THURSDAY: 4th, 11th, and 18th hour from sunrise.

FRIDAY: 1st, 8th, 15th, and 22nd hour from sunrise.

SATURDAY: 5th, 12th, and 19th hour from sunrise.

Using a consecrated athalme, cut a lid in the top of a small pumpkin. Remove the lid and clean out the pumpkin. Then place inside of the pumpkin the following magickal ingredients: a heart-shaped piece of red wax upon which the names (written in runes—characters of ancient alphabets, particularly Teutonic, Scandinavian, and Anglo-Saxon) and astrological symbols of the two intended lovers have been inscribed, a lock of hair from each person at whom this spell is directed, a handful of red or pink rose petals (a plant associated with love magick), a seashell (a symbol sacred to the love Goddess Aphrodite), and a pinch of powdered orris root (a powerful ingredient of love spells).

Replace the lid on the top of the pumpkin, and enchant it by thrice reciting the following incantation over it:

 

EARTH BELOW AND MOON ABOVE,
BRING TO LIFE THIS CHARM OF LOVE.
WITH THY SECRET POWERS TRUE
LET THE PANGS OF LOVE ENSUE.
MOON ABOVE AND EARTH BELOW,
I PRAY THEE YEARNING TO BESTOW
UPON THE TWO WHO SHARE ONE HEART:
LET NOW THE ENCHANTMENT START.
SO MOTE IT BE!
 

Wrap the pumpkin in a piece of red satin and secretly bury it in the ground at night when the moon is shining bright. The pumpkin-of-passion love spell is now complete.

To reverse this spell, carefully dig up the heart-shaped piece of red wax and destroy it by casting it into a fire or into a pot of boiling water as you recite the original incantation backwards. Be sure to do this on a night when the moon is in a waning phase, for this is the appropriate time to reverse love spells and perform magick that brings things to an end.

If done correctly, the magickally inspired feelings of love between the two people whose names were inscribed upon the wax will immediately begin to subside.

 

 

Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore 
Gerina Dunwich

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Love Spells, The Sabbats | Tags: , | Leave a comment

A Lover’s Candle Spell (Samhain)

A LOVER’S CANDLE SPELL

 

The following is an old witches’ love spell from England. It is traditionally performed on Halloween night and calls for the following items: a new candle (preferably pink in color), as many pins as you have suitors, and a strand of hair from each man’s head (assuming that none of them are bald).

Begin by tying a strand of hair from one suitor to the first pin, a strand of hair from the next suitor to the second pin, and so forth. Stick the pins into the side of the candle, spacing them lengthwise. As each pin is stuck into the wax, recite the following magickal rhyme:

 

TIS NOT THIS CANDLE ALONE I STICK,
BUT MY LOVE’S HEART I MEAN TO PRICK.
 

Light the candle with a match and watch it as it burns down to the first pin, and then to the next. When it reaches the pin of your true mate, the front door is supposed to open and your true love will appear.

 
Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich
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A Witchs Lucky Candle Spell (Samhain)

A WITCH’S LUCKY CANDLE SPELL

To bring good luck into your life, take a brand-new orange-colored candle that has never been lit and anoint it with three drops of cinnamon, clove, or lotus oil. (Each one of these oils is said to possess strong luck-attracting vibrations, which make them ideal for this spell.) When the clock strikes midnight on Halloween, light the candle with a match and thrice recite the following incantation:

 

BRIMSTONE, MOON,
AND WITCH’S FIRE,
CANDLELIGHT’S BRIGHT SPELL,
GOOD LUCK SHALL I NOW ACQUIRE,
WORK THY MAGICK WELL.
MIDNIGHT TWELVE, THE WITCHING HOUR,
BRING THE LUCK I SEEK.
BY WAX AND WICK NOW WORK THY POWER
AS THESE WORDS I SPEAK.
HARMING NONE, THIS SPELL IS DONE.
BY LAW OF THREE, SO MOTE IT BE!

 

Gaze into the flame of the candle and fill your mind only with thoughts about good luck. Visualize the Wheel of Fortune turning in your favor. Allow yourself to genuinely feel lucky, as though you had just won a prize. The more emotion you put into your spellcasting, the better the outcome will be. It is also important to never doubt the power of a spell, otherwise your negative thoughts will inadvertently undermine its effectiveness.

Allow the candle to burn until sunrise (the morning of November 1) and the spell shall be fixed. Note: To prevent accidental fires from occurring, many witches place their candles in a sink or bathtub if they are to burn all night long unattended.

If the candle has not burned itself out by sunrise, you may now extinguish its flame by pinching it out with your moistened fingertips or by using a candle snuffer. Remember, as mentioned before, never blow out the flame with your breath because, according to old occult folklore, you will cause all of your good luck to blow away.

To peer into the future or into the realms of the unknown, sit before a mirror at midnight on Halloween. Place a black candle to the left of the mirror, and an orange candle to the right. With a match in each hand,light both candles at the same time, gaze into the reflection of your own eyes in the mirror and concentrate upon that which you desire to know until a vision (often misty at first) appears in the glass. Within this vision your answer may be found.

Another Halloween method of candle divination calls for a small cauldron to be filled with water in which a handful of mugwort gathered on Saint John’s Eve (June 23) has been steeped. (Mugwort is an herb that has long been used by witches to aid divination.) Light two pillar candles—one black and one orange—and hold them about one foot above the cauldron in your left and right hands, respectively. Concentrate upon whatever it is that you desire to know, and then recite it thirteen times in the form of a question as you tilt the candles so that the melted wax spills into the water below. Examine the patterns created by the black and orange wax to find a symbolic divinatory message.

 

 Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich

 

Categories: Articles, Candle Magick, Daily Posts, Luck Spells, The Sabbats | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Halloween Candle Magick

HALLOWEEN CANDLE MAGICK

 

In olden times when Halloween night drew nigh and the season of the witch made its presence strongly felt, many people throughout Europe burned special candles in their windows to light the way for, and welcome back, the returning spirits of deceased ancestors. Halloween candles were also employed as amulets to scare away any unfriendly ghosts that might be wandering about in the night in search of dwellings to haunt.

In the present day, the Halloween custom of candle burning lives on in many parts of the world, including the United States. Candles molded into the shapes of witches, grinning pumpkins, ghosts, skeletons, skulls, black cats, bats, owls, and other Halloween symbols can be found in most stores and are bought by the average person as nothing more than a holiday decoration. However, there is far more to Halloween candles than just their decorative function.

Candles that are fashioned in the stereotypical image of a witch (with black cloak and pointed hat) are displayed on the shelves of many stores around Halloween time. Some are cute and whimsical, while others are intended to look wicked and haglike.

Some modern witches are greatly insulted by such an irreverent and unflattering depiction of witches. They feel it portrays them in an unfavorable fashion, is degrading to those in the Craft, and is greatly detrimental to the progress that many witches’ liberation activists have achieved in combating the numerous negative stereotypes and misconceptions that have long been associated with witches.

On the other hand, many witches take little or no offense to the pointed-hat-wearing witch symbol. Instead, they find it to be humorous or charming. Some witches even embrace it proudly as a kind of mascot, pointing out that the cone-shaped witches’ hat is an obvious phallic symbol, which identifies witchcraft’s ancient roots as a European fertility religion. The hat is also a symbol of what is known as the cone of power (the raising of magickal energy). Either way, the image of a witch is a highly powerful symbol and one that is extremely magickal.

Use white witch-shaped candles in spells and rituals that involve healing, divination, wisdom (witchcraft is not called the “Craft of the Wise” for nothing), transformation, and the strengthening of clairvoyant or magickal abilities. They are also ideal as altar candles for initiation and self-dedication rites, as well as for meditational work. Black witch-shaped candles work especially well in uncrossing rituals and banishing negativity.

Jack-o’-lantern- or pumpkin-shaped candles are appropriate for use in spells and rituals designed for protection against malevolent supernatural forces, negativity, enemies, destructive energies, and all manners of evil.

The image of a pumpkin naturally invokes the special magick of the autumn season, and in many circles it is a symbol of transition. Pumpkin candles are generally orange—a color which, in the art and practice of candle magick, increases the powers of concentration and feelings of courage.

Use any of the following anointment oils to increase a jack-o’-lantern- or pumpkin-shaped candle’s protective powers: cypress (ruled by the planet Saturn and the element of Earth), frankincense (ruled by the Sun and the element of Fire), geranium (ruled by the planet Venus and the element of Water), hazelnut (ruled by the Sun and the element of Air), myrrh (ruled by the Moon and the element of Water), olive (ruled by the Sun and the element of Fire), patchouli (ruled by the planet Saturn and the element of Earth), rosemary (ruled by the Sun and the element of Fire), or vervain (ruled by the planet Venus and the element of Earth).

Ghost-, skeleton-, and skull-shaped candles, with their obvious theme of death, are used by many witches on Halloween in rituals designed to bless and/or welcome back the spirits of the dead. They are also used in séances and spirit channelings, and some people use them to illuminate their Ouija boards as they attempt to communicate with the world beyond.

Many modern-day necromancers (persons who practice the ancient occult method of divining the future through communication with the spirits of men, women, or children who have passed over to the other side) often used skullshaped candles in the rituals to call forth the dead. In earlier times, candles affixed to the top of actual human skulls were utilized for this purpose.

The skull was, at one time, said to be the “seat of the soul.” It was believed by many to possess potent magickal qualities, and it was viewed by most practitioners of the magickal arts as a focus of supernatural power. Its image in candle form is by no means deficient of magickal strength.

The essential oil of anise (ruled by the planet Jupiter and the element of Air) is traditionally used for anointing candles used in spells and rituals to conjure spirits. Orris oil (ruled by the planet Venus and the element of Water) has long been reputed to offer protection against evil spirits, while occult folklore holds that lavender oil (ruled by the planet Mercury and the element of Air), when it is used in the correct magickal manner, can bestow upon a human being the rare power to see ghosts.

Many witches, especially those who are cat-lovers or who have a cat-familiar, use candles in the shape of black cats in spells designed to end streaks of bad luck, strengthen one’s night vision, awaken or increase the powers of clairvoyance, restore balance, banish negative energies, and break the power of curses and hexes. Additionally, black cat candles are appropriate as altar candles for rituals that invoke and/or pay homage to the ancient Egyptian cat Goddess Bastet.

Another popular candle found around Halloween is the bat. This mysterious creature of the night has been linked with witchcraft and the darker side of superstition since the earliest of times. In the Middle Ages it was said that witches used bats’ blood as an ingredient in flying ointments, love potions, and spells to gain the power to see in the dark. It was also believed that witches possessed the ability to shapeshift into bats by means of special charms and incantations. In bat form they could easily gain entry into people’s houses, cause untold mischief, and then disappear quickly and unscathed into the darkness of the night.

Most witches have always considered the bat to be a creature of good luck, even though it is regarded as an unlucky omen in a vast number of folkloric beliefs. Candles that resemble bats are highly effective tools of magick when used in spells and rituals designed to conjure forth good fortune, banish feelings of depression, strengthen one’s night vision, and promote longevity.

A candle in the shape of an owl—another popular symbol of Halloween—is perfect for spells and rituals that are performed to gain wisdom. To make it an even more potent tool of magick, anoint the candle with seven drops of olive oil (ruled by the Sun and the element of Fire, and sacred to the Goddess Athena) or sunflower oil (also ruled by the Sun and the element of Fire).

 

 
Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Wizardry and Enchantments on Samhain/Halloween

Wizardry and Enchantments on Samhain/Halloween

 

Halloween is not only a night for contacting spirits, divination, and revelry. For witches throughout the world it is also a time for conjuring, spellcasting, and brewing up the finest of potions.

Magick that inspires love, connects a witch with the spirit world, or works like a magnet to attract good luck is traditionally practiced at this time of year. Since ancient times, there have existed three basic types of magick that witches and other practitioners of the magickal arts have utilized. They are known as imitative, contagious, and sympathetic.

Imitative magick dates back to prehistoric Europe, and is based on the primitive belief that the act of painting or drawing a picture of something happening will actually cause it to manifest. It is believed that many of the pictures painted on the walls of caves over twenty thousand years ago were created for magickal purposes. For instance, a painting of a hunter spearing his four-legged game would have served to magickally empower the hunter whom the painting depicted.

Contagious magick uses various items belonging to the person to whom the spell is directed. Such items commonly include, but are in no way limited to, an article of worn clothing, a lock of hair, and fingernail clippings. Historically, contagious magick has been used in both the arts of love enchantment and the casting of hexes on enemies.

Sympathetic magick, also known as image magick, is a popular form of magick that operates on the basic principle that “like attracts like.” It is common among those who practice Voodoo, African tribal magick, and Hoodoo folk magick. The sticking of pins into a Voodoo doll to bring pain or death to the person whom the doll represents is one example of the darker side of sympathetic magick. Although the use of Voodoo dolls is generally uncommon among practitioners of the Craft, many modern witches have been known to employ special herb-stuffed cloth dolls known as “poppets” in their healing rituals and amatory enchantments. However, sorcery (also known as Black Magick) and the spreading of negative energy to harm others, gain revenge, or satisfy selfish desires is not what Halloween is about.

The majority of modern witches adhere to a simple and benevolent moral code known as the Rede (or Wiccan Rede), which is as follows: “An’ it harm none, do what thou wilt.” The exact origin of the Rede is somewhat of a mystery; however, some writers have suggested that it is the witches’ version of the Christian’s “Golden Rule.” Its meaning is basically this: Be free to do, either magickally or mundanely, what your heart tells you is the correct thing to do as long as your actions bring harm to none. Most witches believe that if they work any form of magick that is contradictory to the Rede, bad karma (threefold or greater) will return to haunt him or her sooner or later.

 

 

Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

The Witches’ Sabbat

The Witches’ Sabbat

 

In the Middle Ages, Halloween was referred to as the “Black Sabbath” by churchmen who firmly believed, and devoted a major part of their lives and religious careers to making the masses believe, that witches celebrated Halloween by sacrificing and cannibalizing children, dining on bread made from human feces and urine, kissing the backsides of goats and black cats, copulating with the Devil, and other atrocities.

These bizarre acts, and many others, were said to take place each year at the midnight hour on Halloween Eve. They were also said to be held at a secret location where broomstick-riding witches and warlocks gathered in the nude to pay homage to the Lord of Hell, stir up vile potions in their cauldrons, and use their knowledge of the forbidden arts of sorcery to make life as miserable as possible for all of the God-fearing Christian folk.

According to Rossell H. Robbins’s The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology, the investigators and judges connected with the Inquisition appear to be largely responsible for fabricating the conception of the witches’ Sabbat and its celebration of diabolical rites during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. By the sixteenth century, the Sabbat was an established part of belief in witchcraft throughout most of the European countries.

It is believed that the link between the word “Sabbat” (Hebrew for the seventh day) and the seasonal gatherings of witches was forged by the early church. Pagan folks who remained true to the Old Religion (as well as those who were Jews and Mohammedans) were branded by the Church as “traitors to God” and made targets for Christian opposition. Interestingly, in early works, even the word “synagoga,” from “synagogue,” was used by the Church to mean the witches’ Sabbat or Black Mass.

It is doubtful that the above-mentioned practices associated with the witches’ Sabbat actually took place at any location outside of the minds of those possessing overactive, if not twisted, imaginations! In the interest of dispelling the many die-hard myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes that are connected to witches and their celebration of Halloween, it seems only appropriate to discuss the ways that witches do not celebrate it.

First and foremost, witches do not believe in or worship the Christian Devil. He plays no role whatsoever in contemporary witchcraft, Wicca, and paganism (which is often referred to as neo-paganism). Therefore, the Devil is not incorporated into the celebration of Halloween as a Sabbat in any way. Witches do not offer prayers, libations, or sacrifices to him, sign pacts in blood with him, sell their souls to him, involve or invoke him in any aspect of their spirituality or magickal practices, or even acknowledge his existence outside of symbolism and mythology.

Witches do not perform human or animal sacrifices at Sabbats, or for the sake of any spell or ritual. The Goddess and the Horned God—the two central deities worshipped and invoked by most who follow the path of Wicca—do not thirst for blood or hunger for the souls of sacrificial victims. Witches also do not feast upon human flesh, nor do they dine on cakes, breads, or any other food made with the feces, urine, or blood of humans or animals. Witches, of course, never actually flew on broomsticks, although they may have used them as a safe substitute for a magick wand during the “Burning Times,” as brooms were a necessity in every kitchen. Brooms (or “besoms,” as many witches call them) are generally reserved for handfasting ceremonies, in which couples traditionally “jump the broom” for good luck and fertility (as an obvious phallic symbol), or for use within the ritual circle as a tool to symbolically sweep away negative energy vibrations.

Last, Sabbat orgies are not engaged in by the average modern witch, although it is not an uncommon practice for many Wiccan traditions to perform their rites and celebrate their Sabbats skyclad (a word used by witches to mean “in the nude”). The Great Rite (a Wiccan ritual involving sexual intercourse between the High Priestess and High Priest of a coven) is performed at certain Sabbats; however, not all covens incorporate this intimate ritual into their religious practices.

So, what does the Sabbat of Halloween mean then to modern witches? And how do they celebrate it? Halloween is one of the four major Sabbats celebrated by the modern witch, and it is by far the most popular and important of the eight that are observed within the course of a year. It is a point in time that marks both the end and the beginning of the Wheel of the Year, and is a night devoted to honoring all spirits of departed loved ones. Witches regard Halloween as their New Year’s Eve, celebrating it with sacred rituals; feasts consisting of traditional pagan foods, song, and dance; and plenty of old-fashioned merrymaking. Many strive to keep alive the old pagan customs associated with Halloween, while others delight in incorporating new traditions into their Sabbat celebrations and observances. It is also common for spells designed to banish weakness to be cast at this time of the year.

 

Witch’s Halloween: A Complete Guide to the Magick, Incantations, Recipes, Spells, and Lore
Gerina Dunwich
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Sabbats | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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