Pagan Craft Making

Frankincense Protective Necklet

Frankincense Protective Necklet

Several ounces of Frankincense “tears”
(small, rounded lumps)
Empower the frankincense tears with protective energies. Thread a short, thin needle with yellow cotton thread. Heat the needle in a gas flame, in hot water or in a candle flame. (If using a candle flame, quickly wipe off the lampblack – if any – that forms on the needle.) Push the hot needle through the center of a frankincense tear and move it down onto the thread. Repeat the heating and threading process until you’ve created a necklet of frankincense “beads” that you can slip over your head. Knot the ends well and wear for protection or during magickal rituals.
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making | 1 Comment

Magickal Goody for July 8th – Make a Simple Cornhusk Chain

Magickal Goody of the Day

Make a Simple Cornhusk Chain

(get a jump on Lammas decorations while you got all them husks handy!)

 

If you’re having a cookout and planning on eating corn on the cob, this is a great craft to do with all those leftover corn husks. The fresh ones work best, but dried ones can be used if you soak them in water for ten or fifteen minutes and then pat them dry with paper towels.

Separate the husks lengthwise into strips about one inch wide. They should tear easily on their own. Form the first strip into a circle and staple it closed.

Take the second strip, loop it through the first, and staple (this is just like those paper chains you made in school when you were a child). Repeat until all the strips of husk have been added to the chain.

Once you’ve completed your chain, there are a number of things you can do with it. Place it on your altar, drape it over a window or a door, or hang it on the wall. As it dries, the husks will shrink and fade from green to tan, but it will still make a great Lammas decoration!

 

Source:

 Paganism/Wicca Expert

Website: Article found on & owned by About.com

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How to Make Candle Wicks and Candles

WARNING: This is not something a child should help with because it is easy to accidently spill the hot wax and it can cause major burns. When making candles make sure the walkway is clear of all obstacles, children, and pets when carrying hot wax from heat source to molds. If you have a throw rug down pick it up instead of walking over it. Make sure your mold are on an even, sturdy surface before starting to pour them. Candle wax, when melted for making candles, can reach 200 degrees F.

You may have seen a candle-making demonstration where participants are invited to dip strings into hot wax and then cool them in cold water. The finished product often looks more like a bent pepper than a candle. Should you decide to make usable candles, you’ll first want to know how to fashion wicks.

A WICK’S PURPOSE
Wicks aren’t just pieces of string in the center of a candle. The flame of a candle is not made by the wick. Rather, the heated wax creates a vapor which ignites as the flame is carried to the candle’s body by the wick. The flame you see is the vapor being consumed.

To produce a brightly burning, reliable candle, you will require a well-made wick. Use 100% cotton yarn or thread without any dye or bleach. Any thin cotton string, found in some craft or garden supply stores, will suffice.

Wire-core wicks are available commercially and are rigid, but these can contain lead and other metallic toxins that release vapors into the air when a candle is burned. I strongly advise against using these. It is better to have a wick stiffened by proper priming.

SOAK YOUR COTTON
Section at least three pieces of cotton yarn or string. If you are dipping candles, you will want the length of your twine to equal twice the height of your finished candle plus another twelve inches. The reason for this is that a single wick will have a candle formed at each end. If you prefer to make a single candle, cut the wick to equal the height of your candle plus another six inches.

Let the cotton soak in one these solutions all night:

1st Solution
One Tbs salt, two Tbs boric acid (makes the flame deep red), and 1 c. warm water

2nd Solution
2 Tbs salt, 4 Tbs Borax (makes the flame yellowish green) & 1 ½ cups warm water

3rd Solution
Two and a half tablespoons of salt with five and a half tablespoons of Borax in two cups warm water.

OPTIONAL CHEMICALS
Choose one of the following for a different color flame:

  • A tsp of calcium burns reddish orange.
  • A tsp of table salt brings a yellow flame.
  • A tsp of Borax has a yellowish-green appearance.
  • Add a teaspoon of potassium sulfate or saltpeter (potassium nitrate) for a purple flame.
  • A tsp of Epsom salts burns white.
  • A tsp of alum burns green.

The next morning, take the string from the solution and hang until dried completely – for as long as five days.

Braid the dried strands together as tightly as possible.

BRAIDS USED FOR WICKS
Use a flat braid for candles that are tapered. This flattened braid will have a slight curl when it burns. If the wick is matched properly to the size of the candle, the natural curl of the flat braid will reduce the carbon buildup and make the wick self trimming. The ply of a wick refers to the number of strands used to create it. A wick’s ply will tell you if the candle should be a larger or smaller size.

Block candles (without a tapered end) require a square braided wick. Block candles are formed by pouring wax into molds that can be round or square. The square braid is braided in the round and is not flat.

Whichever braid you select, it should be bound tightly. A candle will burn longer and brighter with a quality wick. A loose, poorly constructed wick will shorten the life of your candle.

HOW TO PRIME A WICK
Priming a wick helps to insure that your candles will light more easily. Your primed wick will burn more consistently. Additionally, the wax makes your wick water-resistant. Cotton wicks would easily absorb water otherwise.

Dipping your wick into hot wax until it is thoroughly saturated will prime your wick. When you see bubbles, you will know the wax is saturating your wick. To protect your fingers, you should use a small clip to hold the braid as you dip it. Take the wick out of the wax, tug it taught, lower it into water and then lay it onto waxed paper. Use a paper towel to dab off any excess water. Allow as least 30 seconds for each wick to dry. To encourage stiffness, repeat this process several times. When you are finished, primed wicks can be stored in rolled newspapers.

GUIDELINES FOR SAFETY
If wax boils, it is flammable. Baking soda or a fire extinguisher should be used to stop a fire involving wax. Water will just cause the wax (and the fire) to spread; don’t use it.

Use a double boiler to heat wax; it shouldn’t be placed directly on the heat source. Make your own by placing water at a 3-inch or so depth in a large pot. Put something (i.e. old tuna can or metal cookie cutter) onto the bottom of this pot to act as a barrier between it and the wax container. Bring the water to a boil. Place the wax into a can and lower this onto the barrier in the pot of boiling water.

It is best to work with hot wax while children and pets are away.

Hot wax should never be discarded down a drain. When the wax hardens, it will clog your pipes.

FEATURED VIDEO

http://learnandlivewell.blogspot.com/2009/08/you-may-have-seen-candle-making.html

Posted by Kay

Here is a link to a site that has different type of candle instructions.: http://www.candlescience.com/learn-candle-making

Or you can find one yourself from this general search: https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=easy%20candle%20making%20recipe

Many witches and pagans like to make their own candle for rituals, spell casting or just to burn around the house. The reason for this is they know exactly what type of energy when into the candle when it is formed. There are many way of making candles, pillars, tapers, volitive, tea, ice, sand, the list is almost endless.

Categories: Coven Life, Pagan Craft Making | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Magickal Goody of the Day – Making Your Own Ink

Magickal Goody of the Day

 

Making your own ink can be as simple as going out in the woods and finding a fallen twig and charring the end of it and then using that as a writing utensil. If you are going to use this method, you will need to make a new char-pen for each ritual that you perform. You simply burn the end of the twig until it becomes charcoal (not ash) and then you let it cool and use that to write with. While you are burning the end of the twig, visualize your intent, and continue visualizing your intent while the twig cools off. Once the twig is cool, you can then use it.

You can also make liquid magickal inks, and these will require the use of a quill or a dip pen. Dip pens can usually be found at any stationary store and some office supply stores. Which ever you decide to use, you will need to practice with the quill or dip pen until you are used to the way it functions.

The easiest way to make magickal ink is by using lampblack. It is a long process, but it is well worth it in the end as you have made the ink yourself, saved yourself some money and you have added your own personal power to the ink while you are making it. When using lampblack as the method for making your ink all you need is a candle of appropriate color (white if for general purposes, or if you do not have the proper color candle), a metal spoon, a small piece of card stock or cardboard to scrape the spoon, a small bowl, gum arabic and some distilled water. You may also need something to hold the spoon with if it starts to get hot.

Light the candle, and hold the bottom side of the spoon in the flame until the bottom of spoon is covered with soot. This typically takes about 30-60 seconds depending on the size of the spoon, size of the flame, and how close you hold the spoon to the flame. Once the bottom of the spoon is covered in soot, hold the spoon over the bowl and use the card stock or cardboard to scrape the soot into the bowl. Be careful not to breathe too heavily, as this stuff is almost weightless and will happily fly everywhere if you let it. Also, be sure to do this somewhere where it will not get on your carpet, as it will stain fabric. Repeat this process about sixty times, which will take you anywhere from half an hour to an hour. While you are doing this, if you are making this ink for a specific goal, visualize that goal while you are burning the spoon, and scraping the soot into the bowl. If the spoon gets hot, use a pot holder so that you do not burn your hands. Once you are finished gathering the lampblack (soot), you will need to add, one drop at a time, some hot distilled water. Stop adding water before you think you should. Use your finger to mix the soot and water until the soot has completely dissolved. Lampblack will float on the top of the water, so it will take some effort to get it to dissolve completely. Once the lampblack is dissolved completely, and you have rich dark colored water, add some powdered gum arabic to the mix and again stir with your finger until the gum arabic has dissolved. Add enough gum arabic to make the ink have the same consistency has commercial produced ink. After you have completed the ink, you can store it in a jar and use it as needed.

 

 

Practical Magick for the Penny Pinching Witch

Carol Moyer

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making | 1 Comment

Magickal Goody of the Day for June 30 – Make Your Own Moon Water

Magickal Goody of the Day

witch potion 001Make Your Own Moon Water

Moon water is simple to make and can be used for all sorts of spell work, rituals and anointing. It is useful to have in stock when you need to use the power of the Moon phase at a different time.

Using a dish, bowl or bottle, fill it with spring water and leave it outside (if it can be safely done) or on a windowsill so that it can soak up the power of the Full Moon. You can also do the same process on the New, Waxing, Waning or Dark Moon phases also. Once the water has absorbed the power of the Moon, you can keep it in an air-tight bottle for future use.

You can also add a pinch of sea salt to the water to give it extra cleansing and purifying oomph.

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Magical Goody of the Day for June 22nd – Citrus Delight Potpourri

Magickal Goody of the Day

 

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Citrus Delight Potpourri

2 tbsp of dried Orris root
5 tbsp of Bearberry leaves
6 – 8 drops of lemon essential/fragrance oil
1/2 cup of dried Yarrow blossoms
1/2 cup of Lemon verbena
1/4 cup of dried Safflower flowers
1/4 cup of Orange peels finely sliced and dried.

This potpourri recipe makes your house smell so good, everyone will then you have just cleaned it. Fresh, lovely and invigorating!

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Simple New Moon Charm

Simple New Moon Charm

One of the easiest charms to use for luck is a hag stone (stone with a hole in it). These are found on many beaches and river beds. Leave the stone out on the night of a Waxing Moon, then thread a piece of green ribbon or cord through the hole and wear it as a pendant or hang it from your handbag, your altar or in your car to bring you good luck.

Moon Magic – Pagan Portals
Rachel Patterson

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Magickal Boosters, The Sun, The Moon, etc., Pagan Craft Making | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Magickal Goody of the Day for June 14th is A Summer Solstice Herb Pouch

Magickal Goody of the Day

Summer Solstice Herb Pouch

 

The summer solstice is a great time to harvest your herbs. Usually by now, gardens are in full bloom, and if you do any wildcrafting, midsummer is a perfect season to find some goodies out in the woods. You can take some of the herbs associated with the Litha season and make an herb pouch to hang in your home (or carry with you) as a multi-purpose talisman.

In many magical traditions, the number nine is seen as sacred, so we’re going to use nine different herbs in this pouch project.

These are all herbs commonly available during the midsummer season, but if you don’t have access to them, feel free to substitute other herbs that grow in your area. Usually people use dried herbs in craft projects, but because these are growing right now, you may want to just use them fresh.

Gather equal amounts of the following herbs:

  • Basil, for good fortune
  • Hyssop, for cleansing and purifying
  • Lavender, for calmness and peace
  • Mugwort, for divination and dreams
  • Peppermint, for passion and love
  • Rosemary, for remembrance
  • Sage, for wisdom
  • Thyme, for psychic development
  • Yarrow, for healing

Blend your herbs together in a bowl. If you’re using dried herbs, crush them into a fine powder using your mortar and pestle. If you’re using fresh ones, it’s probably better to simply tear or chop them into equally sized pieces. This will help release the essential oils, and allow you to take advantage of the fragrances.

Stitch together a basic drawstring pouch using a summery color fabric (yellow or orange is perfect, but work with what you have).

If you don’t have any bright colors available, a plain muslin or cloth fabric will do just fine. Place the herbs in the pouch, and pull the drawstring tightly.

You can keep the pouch on your altar during your midsummer celebrations, hang it over your door to welcome guests, or even carry it in your pocket as a summertime talisman.

 

Source:

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: | 1 Comment

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