Pagan Craft Making

Ostara Incense

Ostara Incense

Recipe by Scott Cunningham

2 parts Frankincense 1 part Benzoin 1 part Dragon’s Blood 1/2 part Nutmeg 1/2 part Violet flowers (or a few drops Violet oil) 1/2 part Orange peel 1/2 part Rose petals

Burn during Wiccan rituals on Ostara (the Spring Equinox, which varies from March 20th to the 24th each year), or to welcome the spring and refresh your life.

(The above recipe for “Ostara Incense” is directly quoted from Scott Cunningham’s book: “The Complete Book of Incense, Oils & Brews”, page 83, Llewellyn Publications, 1992.)

 

Source

Ostara Lore

Researched and Compiled by StormWing

About these ads
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Natural Oestara Eggs

Natural Oestara Eggs

by Ariadne

Natural egg-dying is like recycling. It takes a li’l bit longer to do, but gives you that Oh-Im-soooooo-WC (witchly correct) feeling.

Cover your plant material (see list below) with about 3 inches of water, bring to a boil, and simmer until the color looks good. You’ll probably have to let the eggs sit in the dye overnight, so if you’re planning more than one color per egg, start this a few days before Oestara. Experimenting is half the fun, but here are some hints to get you started:

Yellows- daffodil petals, saffron, turmeric, onion skins Blues- blueberries, red cabbage leaves & vinegar Greens-broccoli, coltsfoot Pinks- cochineal, madder root Browns – walnut shells, tea, coffee

Wanna get fancy? Gather some small leaves, ferns, flowers and grasses. Dip them in water (to help them stick) and press them onto your eggs. Wrap each egg in a piece of cut up pantyhose and secure it with a twist tie before dyeing. When you remove the flower or leaf, it’s design will appear (either in white or in your first dye-color). Rub your finished eggs with a tiny bit of vegetable oil on a soft cloth to shine them.

Too hard?? No hosiery??? Okay, try using crayons to draw spirals and pentagrams on the eggs before dying them.

Now, plan a fertility ritual for your garden. Bury an Oestara egg in the east corner of your garden, or one egg for each direction, or dig an entire circle for them (depends on how much you hate egg-salad).

 

Source:

Ostara Lore

Researched and Compiled by StormWing

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

WOTC Extra – Making Your Own Ritual Robe

Witchy Comments & Graphics

WOTC Extra – Making Your Own Ritual Robe

Many Wiccans and Pagans prefer to perform ceremonies and rituals in special robes. If you’re part of a coven or group, your robe might have to be a certain color or style. In some traditions, the color of the robe indicates the level of training a practitioner has. For many people, donning the ritual robe is a way of separating themselves from the mundane business of everyday life — it’s a way of stepping into the ritual mindset, of walking from the mundane world into the magical world. Most people prefer to wear nothing at all under their ritual robe, but do what is comfortable for you.

It’s not uncommon to have robes for the different seasons, symbolizing the turning Wheel of the Year. You can make one in blue for spring, green for summer, brown for fall, and white for winter — or any other colors that symbolize the seasons for you. Do take the time to put some thought into your color selection — it used to be that most Wiccans wore white robes, but many people prefer to use earth tones, because it’s a way of establishing one’s connection with nature. Some people choose to avoid black, because it sometimes has negative connotations, but use the color that feels right for you.

Anyone can make a robe of their own, and it’s not hard to do. If you can sew a straight line, you can make a robe. First of all, for experienced sewers, there are a number of excellent commercially available patterns out there. You can check catalogs at your local fabric store under “Costumes”, which is where most of the good robes are hiding out, especially in the “historical” and “Renaissance” categories. Here are some that look nice and can be made without too much sewing experience:

* Simplicity 4795: Believe it or not, this is a set of patterns for a passion play. There’s an angel design in here that’s fantastic for a ritual robe. You may want to reduce the drop in the sleeves a bit, though, just to keep from setting yourself on fire while lighting candles.
* Simplicity 3623: This pattern is for a Scottish-themed costume, complete with tam. However, it also includes a pattern for a muslin underdress to be worn beneath the bodice and skirt — this makes a great ritual robe, and can be assembled in just a couple of hours.
* Simplicity 3616: Sure, the wizard costume seems campy, but if you eliminate the trim and the long white beard, it makes a version of the ritual robe that is far more masculine than some of the other patterns.
* McCalls 4490: For more advanced sewers, this lovely Renaissance-style dress can easily be adapted for a ritual robe.

To make a basic robe without buying a pattern, you can follow these simple steps. You’ll need the following:

* A piece of material in the color of your choice — make sure you select something that will be easy to sew and comfortable to wear. On the average, you’ll need about three yards, but if you’re heavyset or extra-tall, add in some more. A flat bedsheet is actually the perfect size for this.
* Scissors, thread, tailor’s chalk, and a measuring tape.
* A sewing machine.
* A length of cord or light rope, approximately 6 feet long.

You’ll need some help for this first step, because you need to measure yourself from wrist to wrist with your arms outstretched. Unless you have a third arm, get a friend to do this for you. This measurement will be Measurement A. Next, figure the distance from the nape of your neck to a point even with your ankle — this will be Measurement B. Fold the fabric in half (if the material has a print on it, fold it with the pattern side in). Using your A and B measurements, cut out along the lines indicated in Figure 1, making a sort-of T-shape. Don’t cut out along the top fold — that’s the part that will go along the top of the arms and shoulders.

Next, cut a hole for your head (X) at the center of Measurement A. Don’t make it too big, or your robe will slide off your shoulders! On each side, sew along the underside of the sleeve, leaving an opening at Y for the arms (Figure 2). Then sew from the armpit down to the bottom of the robe. Turn your robe right-side out, try it on, and adjust it for length if needed.

Finally, add a cord around the waist, as shown in Figure 3. In some traditions the cord may be knotted to indicate degrees of training or education. In others, it acts simply as a belt to keep the robe from flapping around during ritual. You can also add trim, beadwork, or magical symbols to your robe. Personalize it, and make it yours. You may also wish to consecrate your robe before wearing it for the first time.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Witch, The Witch's Tools, Witchcraft | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How To Make a Priapic Wand for Imbolc

How To Make a Priapic Wand

By

Priapus was a god of fertility, and was always depicted with an erect phallus. In some traditions of Paganism and Wicca, a Priapic wand — phallus-like in appearance — is made, and used in ritual to bring forth the new growth of spring. You can easily make one out of a few outside supplies and some bells. This is a simple project for children as well, and they can go outside at Imbolc and shake the bells at the ground and the trees, calling for spring’s return.

Difficulty: Easy
Time Required: 30 minutes

Here’s How:

  1. First, you’ll need the following items:

    • A stick
    • An acorn
    • Craft glue (hot glue works fine as well)
    • Ribbons or yarn in brown, green, yellow, and gold
    • Small bells (get little jingle bells at your local craft store)

    Strip the bark from the stick, and create a small notch on one end. Glue the acorn to the end of the stick.

    When the glue is dry, wrap the stick in the ribbons or yarn beginning at the acorn — leave extra ribbon at the end to hang down like streamers. Tie the bells on to the end of the streamers.

  2. Use the wand by going outside around the time of Imbolc. Explain to children that the wand symbolizes the god of the forest, or whatever fertility god exists in your tradition. Show them how to shake the bells, pointing the wand at the ground and trees, in order to wake the sleeping plants within the earth. If you like, they can say an incantation as they do so, like:

    Wake, wake, plants in the earth, spring is a time of light and rebirth. Hear, hear this magical sound, and grow, grow, out of the ground.

What You Need

  • A stick
  • An acorn
  • Ribbons or yarn
  • Small jingly bells

 

About.com

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Yule Soap

Yule Soap

1 cup grated unscented soap

1/4 cup hot water

1 tbsp. apricot oil

1 tbsp. chamomile

1/2 tbsp. rosemary

1/2 tbsp. ginger

6 drops frankincense oil

6 drops myrrh oil

3 drops cinnamon oil

Place grated soap in a heat-proof non-metallic container and add the hot water and apricot oil. Leave until it is cool enough to handle, and then mix together with your hands. If the soap is floating on the water, add more soap. Leave to sit for 10 minutes, mixing occasionally, until the soap is soft and mushy. Once the soap, water, and oil are blended completely, add the dry ingredients. Once the mixture is cool, then add the essential oils (essential oils evaporate quickly in heat). Enough essential oils should be added to overcome the original scent of the soap. Blend thoroughly and then divide the soap mixture into four to six pieces. Squeeze the soaps, removing as much excess water as possible into the shape you desire, and tie in a cheesecloth. Hang in a warm, dry place until the soap is completely hard and dry.

Recipe adapted from Kate West’s The Real Witches’ Kitchen Sabbat Soap recipe.

Categories: Articles, Baths/Soaps/Foams/Shampoos, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Solstice Ritual Potpourri

Winter Solstice Ritual Potpourri

Recipe by Gerina Dunwich

20 drops musk oil

25 drops pine oil

1 cup oak moss

2 cups dried mistletoe

1 cup dried poinsettia flowers

1 cup dried bayberries

1/2 cup dried rosemary

1/2 cup dried holly leaves and berries

3 crushed pinecones

Mix the musk and pine oils with the oak moss, and then add the remaining ingredients. Stir the potpourri well and store in a tightly covered ceramic or glass container.

(The above recipe for “Yule Ritual Potpourri” is quoted directly from Gerina Dunwich’s book “The Wicca Spellbook: A Witch’s Collection of Wiccan Spells, Potions and Recipes”, page 162, A Citadel Press Book, Carol Publishing Group, 1994/1995)

 

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to Make Ice Candles

How to Make Ice Candles

By , About.com

Ice candles are a lot of fun and easy to make during the winter months. Since February is traditionally a snow-filled time, at least in the northern hemisphere, why not make some ice candles to celebrate Imbolc, which is a day of candles and light?

You’ll need the following:

  • Ice
  • Paraffin wax
  • Color and scent (optional)
  • A taper candle
  • A cardboard container, like a milk carton
  • A double boiler, or two pans

Melt the paraffin wax in the double boiler. Make sure that the wax is never placed directly over the heat, or you could end up with a fire. While the wax is melting, you can prepare your candle mold. If you want to add color or scent to your candle, this is the time to add it to the melted wax.

Place the taper candle into the center of the cardboard carton. Fill the carton with ice, packing them loosely in around the taper candle. Use small chunks of ice — if they’re too large, your candle will be nothing but big holes.

Once the wax has melted completely, pour it into the container carefully, making sure that it goes around the ice evenly. As the hot wax pours in, it will melt the ice, leaving small holes in the candle. Allow the candle to cool, and then poke a hole in the bottom of the cardboard carton so the melted water can drain out (it’s a good idea to do this over a sink). Let the candle sit overnight so the wax can harden completely, and in the morning, peel back all of the cardboard container. You’ll have a complete ice candle, which you can use in ritual or for decoration.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Let’s Get Crafty – Making a Smudging Stick

Making a Smudging Stick

Be aware of any dangerous chemical reactions or allergies to the plants being used. If you intend to burn a plant in a smudge stick do your research into the plant first to ensure that what you are burning is not dangerous to your health. Always find out if you are allergic first, and have another person on hand or ready to help you if something goes wrong. Call 911 or the appropriate telephone number if a dangerous condition occurs.

Always be careful of how you burn your smudge stick, ensuring that you do not burn yourself. Always use proper fire preventative measures; place burning objects within or upon the appropriate fire burning apparatus. Be aware that holding the smudge stick within your hands can result in burning your hands.

When wrapping the bundle, you should be careful to wrap tightly enough to hold the stems and leaves in place, but not to cut them.

Humidity is a factor in dry time, ensure that your bundle has dried fully before attempting to burn it.

Ensure that there is no mold/mildew growth upon your bundle before burning it.

~Ingredients~

  • Herb(s) appropriate for the smudging
  • String that will safely burn, such as jute line or cotton string

~Process~

  1. Select your fresh herb from the plant (unless you can get long stems of plants elsewhere).
  2. Cut the plant according to size. Plants which are more leafy should be cut in smaller sections, and those that are less leafy can be cut in larger sections.
  3. Cut the string to a good length, such as five to six feet.
  4. Place the pieces according to like, stems to stems and leafs to leafs.
  5. Wrap string around the base, leaving a few inches of string loose.
  6. Wrap up from stems to leafs, then back again in a crisscross pattern.
  7. After returning to the base, tie the few inches from before to the end of your string.
  8. Trim if necessary to give a uniform look.
  9. Place your bundle in a place where it shall dry.
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Witch's Tools | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,553 other followers