Herbal Remedies

Herbs For Children

Herbs For Children

There are many herbal treatments that are safe and effective for use with children of all ages. Here I will deal with the childhood illnesses and problems I am most often asked about. The most important factor in dealing with any illness, whether acute or chronic, is diet. A proper diet goes a long way to alleviating problems and illnesses that stem from inadequate nutrition. Were you aware that medical studies are proving that diet can profoundly affect illness in children? It has also been proven that a lot of dietary factors are responsible for worsening such problems as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), hyperactivity, asthma, and others. A child who is getting what his or her body needs through good nutrition is going to develop more normally, be less prone to illness, and the duration of common illnesses is shortened.

Remember too that our children today are under a lot of stress, just as us adults are. Peer pressures, pressures in the classroom, dealing with separation anxieties and broken marriages are just some of the things creating stressful situations for our youngsters. This stress can manifest itself in many mysterious physical and mental ailments. Teaching your children when young how to meditate and relax is an important building block for their young lives, and is a useful tool that they will carry with them through adulthood.

Externally, these problems can be alleviated with a warm herbal bath at bedtime. Combine a handful of lavendar and a handful of chamomile in one quart of water. Bring to a boil, cover, and let steep for 15 to 20 minutes. Strain, then add the liquid to a warm bath for the child. This is good for colicky infants as well. Allow the child to bathe and relax in the warm water. Internally, a cup of the infusion of chamomile and/or scullcap can be very beneficial and calming.

Chickenpox usually strikes in young children, but older ones do get it as well. To relieve the itching that usually makes the pox so unbearable, you can make a decoction of chickweed, comfrey, and rosemary. Apply the warm mixture with a clean cloth. Don’t rub, as this will irritate the sores and can cause them to leave scars, but gently pat the solution on. Allow to air dry. This can be applied several times per day to relieve the itching. Internally, the child may benefit from a mild infusion of echinacea, catnip, chickweed, and yarrow. After the illness, and after any illness, the child’s digestive system will benefit from acidophilus, or a cup of yogurt, to aid getting the beneficial bacteria in the digestive system back in balance.

Most of the same herbs used to treat colds in adults can also treat colds in children. You will want to reduce the dosages, however, or make milder infusions than normal. Steam or inhalant therapy can also help, using essential oils of lavendar, tea tree, eucalyptus, and/or peppermint. Make sure the child is getting plenty of vitamin C in their daily diet for the duration of the cold.

Colic is torture for the baby and the parent. There are easy ways to alleviate the problem, however. Give the baby a small amount of peppermint, chamomile, or catnip infusion in a bottle at the first sign of distress. It also helps to give the baby a warm bath that has lavendar essential oil added. The vapors have a calming, soothing affect on baby and parent. Breastfeeding mothers will want to add some fennel to their diet for a couple of days to help alleviate the colic.

Coughs in children are common, and usually accompany many of the normal childhood illnesses. A cough that continues for several days, or increases in severity, should be immediately checked by a physician to rule out other diseases. A mild infusion of mullein and coltsfoot usually helps the mild cough. Horehound and/or ginger can be added if a stronger combination is needed for older children. The child can also benefit from chest rubs of tea tree oil or peppermint oil. Both should be diluted in olive or sesame oil, and remember to do a patch test first to determine sensitivity. Inhaling the vapors of the essential oil of lavendar, and/or a warm bath that includes lavendar oil, can also help clear a cough. Cut back or eliminate dairy products in children that have a lot of mucous with their coughs, as dairy often adds to the production of mucous.

Cradle cap usually appears in the first month of an infant’s life. Make a decoction of calendula and comfrey root. Rinse the baby’s head with the warm solution each night, allowing it to air dry on the scalp. It may take a few days for this to clear up the problem. You can also massage olive oil into the scalp each night, washing it away thoroughly with a mild soap and water each morning. Leaving the oil on the scalp continually can actually increase the problem.

This is a common problem that is easy to deal with. It is usually caused by irritating diapers, prolonged contact with wet or dirty diapers, or even a reaction to the soap used to wash cotton diapers. Some foods and juices ingested by the infant can raise acid levels in the urine and stool, causing a skin reaction. Wash the baby thoroughly and dry thoroughly at each diaper change. Use plain mild soap and water, as some of those baby wipes can irritate, due to the chemicals in them. Leaving the diaper off for a while each change can also help clear up the rash. You can apply a cream made of calendula and/or aloe vera. You can also add to that mixture comfrey and/or chickweed. Remember that problem will not go away with herbs alone. You also need to determine the cause and eliminate it.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration rapidly in small infants and very young children. It can be treated with a mild infusion of meadowsweet, rosemary, and/or red raspberry. If diarrhea continues for more than three days, or is accompanied by blood in the stool, or severe cramping, seek emergency medical care immediately.

There is strong evidence that chemicals such as heavy metal pollutants, dietary allergies such as to wheat, corn, dairy, etc., and artificial colorings, preservatives, or flavorings, play a role in these problems. As such, you will want to treat by supporting both the nervous system and the liver, aiding in detoxification. A treatment plan should consist of chamomile, gotu kola, scullcap, red clover, milk thistle, and gingko biloba. A daily supplement of flax seed and/or grape seed oil has also shown to be beneficial. The herbal bath above can help, as well as inhaling or massaging with a calming essential oil such as lavendar. And most important, look at changing the diet to one that supports the body. Natural diet is best. Eliminate foods that could cause an allergic reaction, and add them back to the diet one at a time, watching for any changes in the child’s behavior. Be sure the child gets adequate amounts of zinc and B-complex vitamins as well.

Internally give a combination of echinacea, chickweed, and astragalus 3 to 4 times per day. Reduce the child’s intake of dairy, red meats, and peanut butter, as all have been shown to irritate this illness. Wash the sores carefully with an infusion made of calendula several times per day.

Flu can be treated internally with boneset, fenugreek, peppermint, echinacea, and mullein. Eucalyptus or tea tree oil can be inhaled to open blocked sinus passages, or rubbed on the chest to help open the bronchial tubes. Additional vitamin C and zinc are also beneficial.

Lice can be treated by placing drops of tea tree oil on a fine toothed comb, and comb the hair thoroughly every day for two weeks. Wash the hair nightly with a mild shampoo that has oil of thyme and tea tree oil added. Alternatively, you can mix together 4 cups of apple cider vinegar, 4 cups of water, 1/2 ounce oil of thyme; use nightly as a shampoo.

Measles is usually treated herbally in the same manner as chicken pox. Eye strain and discomfort is common with the measles, so keep the child in a darkened room. A mild infusion of eyebright may be used to ease discomfort in the eyes. This can be used as a wash for the older child, or for young children you can soak a clean cloth in the eyebright infusion and apply as an external compress over the eyes.

Mumps can be treated internally with a combination of echinacea, clover, chamomile, and peppermint. Externally, fresh chopped ginger applied as a compress can alleviate the pain of the swelling. Gentle massage of the swollen areas with chamomile oil is also beneficial. Inhaling eucalyptus oil also helps.

Teething pain can be soothed by giving a chamomile and/or lemon balm infusion internally. Mix a teaspoon of powdered slippery elm bark with a little water to make a paste, and rub it gently on the gums.

Tonsillitis can be treated with echinacea, mullein, chamomile, and sage internally. A gargle of salt water, honey and lemon (if the child is over the age of three), or sage infusion can greatly ease the discomfort.


From the Website, Coven of the Goddess.com



Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbal Remedies, Herbs | 1 Comment

Some Herbs Known to be Dangerous to Pregnant Women


Contains sterols and saponins in doses too high for safety during pregnancy.

Avoid during early pregnancy; as is a uterine stimulant.. Is used in labor and to expel the afterbirth.

Both of these contain hormones.

Listed by some sources as a uterine stimulant. Lowers blood sugar levels.

Dyers Chamomile promotes menstruation – the oils of both Roman & German Chamomile are uterine stimulants.

Therapeutic doses may cause miscarriage.. (Uterine stimulant).

Contains sterols and saponins in doses too high for safety during pregnancy.

Used to treat herpes, in high doses it can cause convulsions. May cause miscarriage.

Will cause miscarriage.

A uterine stimulant that may cause FETAL ABNORMALITIES!! Thujone can harm babies through BREAST FEEDING!! Is used to expel afterbirth.

Traditionally has been used to induce miscarriage.

Traditionally has been used to induce miscarriage.

Used to treat congestion in uterus; traditionally has been used to induce miscarriage.

Avoid during early pregnancy; as is a uterine stimulant. Rapidly & temporarily lowers blood pressure.

Avoid during early pregnancy; as is a uterine stimulant.

may cause miscarriage.

Avoid during early pregnancy; a uterine stimulant.

May cause FETAL ABNORMALITIES!! Can also harm babies through BREAST FEEDING!! Is used to expel afterbirth.

A uterine stimulant.


From the Website, Coven of the Goddess.com


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Working & Healing with Herbs

Working & Healing with Herbs

There are two basic ways a witch can use herbs in her healing practices:
* For medicinal purposes
* For magical purposes
These methods may overlap, as herbs may be simultaneously used for medicinal and magical purposes. The ways in which herbs are prepared and used may also overlap, as herbal oils, incense, and teas may be used for both medicinal and magical purposes.

Medicinal Herbs
Herbs are one of the most ancient forms of medicine. They were the precursor to many of our modern pharmaceuticals. In ancient times, medicine men and women would use herbs to heal wounds and disease and were able to discover surprisingly accurate chemical information about plants from around the world.

Herbalists today rely on both ancient wisdom and the knowledge of modern science. There remains, however, a reverence for the plant and herbs are never used without first understanding their effects. Some herbs have immediate effect on the body and many can be toxic.

Herbal Applications
Medicinally, herbs can be applied in many different ways. The easiest and most common are:
* Herbal teas
* Herbal compresses & poultices
* Herbal oils & tinctures

Herbal Teas
Herbal teas are made from non-toxic herbs that can be taken internally. When using an herbal tea, it is easiest to purchase dried and cut herbs. Vitamin Cottage, Wild Oats, and Whole Foods are just a few examples of stores that carry many varieties of herbs. You can also order herbs wholesale and Stella makes a regular order of these herbs.

There are two basic methods to prepare herbal teas:
* Infusion which is used for delicate plant parts like flowers and leaves as well as herbs with a high volume of essential oils (like mints). In an infusion, the herbs are steeped for 10-20 minutes in a tightly covered container with boiling water.
* Decoction which is used to extract the deeper essences from coarser leaves, stems, barks, and roots. In this method, the herbs are simmered in water, generally uncovered, until the water volume is decreased by about half, about one hour, and then strained.

When making an herbal tea, it is standard to use one ounce of dried herb, either alone or in formula, to each pint of water (or 1 Tbsp. per 8 oz. water). The standard therapeutic dosage of the tea is one-half cup tea, 3x per day.

Herbal Compresses & Poultices
Herbs can also be applied externally to relieve skin diseases as well as to be absorbed via the skin. An herbal compress can be made by soaking towels in a hot tea infusion and then applying to the skin, covering with flannel or a dry towel and then a hot water bottle or heating pad. It is also possible to soak a part of one’s body in the hot tea to achieve the same effect (such as a peppermint footbath for indigestion, a tea tree footbath for athlete’s foot, or a mustard footbath for colds/flu).

A poultice is made by powdering or macerating fresh or dried herbs and applying them directly to the affected area. Alternately, you can also create a plaster by placing the herbs between two layers of linen or cotton.

Herbal Oils & Tinctures
Another very effective method of using herbs is through oil, both oil extracts and essential oils.

To create an oil extract, the herbs are prepared by macerating them and then adding olive or sweet almond oils (about one pint to 2 oz. herb). The mixture is then allowed to stand in a warm place for three days, or, a faster method is to heat the oil and herbs in a saucepan for at least an hour. In either method, the herbs are then strained off and the oil is bottled, preferably in a dark bottle to keep the oil from oxidizing too quickly.

Essential oils are easily purchased at any of the above locations or metaphysical stores like Herbs & Arts. They vary in expense and quality; you should always make sure to get the essential oil of the plant rather than anything synthetic. Most essential oils, with the exception of lavender and tea tree oils, need to be diluted in a carrier oil before they are applied to the skin. Sweet almond, jojoba, or apricot kernel are good choices for a carrier oil although in a pinch you can substitute olive oil or even good ‘ole vegetable oil.

One nice way to use essential oils is in a diffuser. A diffuser gently heats the oil and allows the scent to spread out throughout the space. I prefer diffusers to incense because they do not burn the herbs, which creates smoke. Essential oils are excellent for aromatherapy, one form of herbal healing.

Tinctures are similar to oils except that alcohol is used to extract the herbal ingredients. It is relatively easy to make tinctures at home by combining 4 oz. of powdered or cut herb with one pint of vodka, brandy, gin, or rum. Shake daily, allowing the herbs to extract for about two weeks. Let the herbs settle and then pour off the tincture, straining through a fine cloth or filter. It is best to put up a tincture at the new moon and strain it off on the full moon to take advantage of the drawing power of the waxing moon.

Tinctures are also readily purchased at any of the above locations. Some are made without alcohol and most are standardized. Like oils, tinctures should be stored in dark bottles and administered with an eyedropper. They are concentrated herbal extracts that only require a few drops to about a teaspoon per dose. Generally, tinctures are made of more potent herbs that are unsuitable for consumption via an herbal tea.

Using Herbs Medicinally
Like other foods and magical correspondences, herbs possess varying qualities. Some of the more common are: pain relieving, antibiotic/antiviral, gas relieving, sweat inducing, soothing, menstruation promoting, mucus expelling, energy stimulating, and wound healing.

Getting to know how herbs work is a matter of study and experience. If you want to use herbs medicinally, it is recommended that you get a good herb book (a few recommendations at the end) or even take more extensive classes. Herbs are medicine. They are not to be used or taken lightly. It can be difficult to standardize their use, so every practitioner should use caution and seek the advice of a trained herbalist if you are ever unsure!

There are, however, many common herbs and spices that are gentle and non-toxic. We’ll talk about a few of them in this class. If you are new to working with herbs, this would be an excellent place to begin experimenting!

Kitchen Herbs & Spices
Anise will relieve colic and gas.

Bay oil can be applied to arthritic joints and sprains.

Cayenne is a wonder healer that can be used to prevent heart problems, lose weight, stave off colds/flu/fever, relieve arthritis pain, and more.

Clove powder or oil can be used to relieve toothache pain.

Cumin will prevent and relieve gas (serve with beans!).

Dill will relieve colic and stomach ache.

Garlic oil can be used for colds & flu and to relieve earache.

Ginger can be applied via compress to treat pain and inflammation. It is also excellent for colds/flu/fever and to “activate” any herbal formula.

Olive oil can be taken regularly as a mild laxative.

Rosemary tea can be used as a substitute for aspirin for headache.

Sage tea can be used as a gargle for sore throat.

Other Herbs
Tea Tree (Cajeput) oil can be applied to treat athlete’s foot, to the scalp to get rid of lice & nits, to open blocked sinuses, to relieve nasal and mouth sores, as mouthwash (3 drops in a cup of water), to relieve muscle aches, for acne, for fingernail infections, to promote wound healing, and for arthritis.

Chamomile is known as the “Band Aid” of the stomach and is indicated for all stomach and gastrointestinal discomfort. It is also an excellent remedy for menstrual cramps. Chamomile is traditionally used as a remedy for insomnia.

Catnip is a sedative and therefore excellent for insomnia as wellas gently relieving built-up emotional tension. It is also an excellent treatment for diarrhea and colic. It is best taken as tea.

Damiana is an aphrodisiac and also useful for treating depression.

Eucalyptus is one of the most powerful natural antiseptics and is wonderful for chest congestion. Can be rubbed on the chest and back or used in a humidifier or steam bath.

Lavender is an aromatic anti-depressant that is also sleep-inducing.

Lemongrass is the source of citronella oil and may be used to repel insects. It relieves gas and is antimicrobial. It has a sedative effect and is therefore helpful in relieving insomnia. Lemongrass supports the parasympathetic nervous system, which is important in the processes of healing and stress relief. The oil can also alleviate headache. It is excellent in a diffuser. Avoid use during pregnancy.

Licorice root has been shown to be as effective at relieving heartburn as many commercial treatments (like “the purple pill”). It is also a mild laxative and is sweet, so is excellent to add to other bitter herbs. It should be avoided by those with high blood pressure or during pregnancy and should not be used for prolonged periods.

Peppermint (and spearmint) are effective sweating agents to be used for cold, flu, and fever. They are also useful in relieving gas. Peppermint is also good for relieving depression and may be effective in relieving headache.

Raspberry Leaf has been used for centuries by women during pregnancy and childbearing to facilitate delivery and prevent miscarriage. It has a relaxing effect on the uterus and is an excellent tonic for general uterine and reproductive health.

Slippery Elm is a mucilaginous herb that is excellent for sore or irritated throats, cough, or dry throat and lungs. It is also a survival food and may be eaten as needed; it will generally stay down even when all else causes vomiting.

Stevia is an herb that is 10-30 time sweeter than sugar. It makes an excellent, natural sugar substitute and may help to control blood sugar.

Herbs can be combined to create a formula with multiple effects. It is important to store herbs and herbal formulas in glass jars to prevent volatile oils from evaporating. Be sure to label jarsparticularly if there is more than one herb in the formula!

The inhalation of essential oils has been used for thousands of years as an aid to physical and emotional well-being. Aromatherapy links the healing powers of the oils themselves with the receptivity of the human skin and sense of smell. Aromatherapy is particularly useful in treating anxiety and depression and releasing/relieving stress.

Aromatherapy can be used in several ways. One is massage, which activates the circulation in the skin and speeds the entry of the oils into the body (make sure to dilute essential oils before using on skin!). Another method is to put a couple of drops of oil into a hot bath. The oils can also be inhaled by placing a couple of drops in a bowl of hot water and breathing in the steam (or by using a commercial vaporizer). Essential oils can be combined with Epsom and sea salts to create bath salts and bath bombs; they can also be added to an unscented base of shampoo, conditioner, or moisturizer. The oils can be inhaled directly from the bottle. And, my favorite method, is a candle-heated diffuser, which you can buy in just about any metaphysical or health food store. Here are some common essential oils:
Lemon balm and lemongrass are used to disperse depression.

Sandalwood is used for tension and anxiety; is a sexual stimulant.

Ylang-ylang is a sedative and antidepressant.

Lavender can heal burns and wounds and is a relaxant.

Rose is helpful for relieving tension in women, especially stress.

Jasmine oil can treat addictions and is a powerful relaxant.

Rosemary can relieve fatigue and headache when inhaled.

Peppermint relieves headache and stimulates perspiration.

Like cut herbs, essential oils can be combined in formula to increase their effectiveness.

Magical Herbs
In addition to their medicinal purposes, herbs can also be used in many forms of magic for healing or other intentions. Perhaps the most important reference guide for this purpose is Scott Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbalism. However, like all things in magic, herbs should be used as they are meaningful to you, not just like how other witches have worked with them.

Like their medicinal qualities, herbs also possess magical correspondences which align them with the four elements as well as other things we may wish to bring to or put out of our lives. There are also a number of magical applications for herbs, including, but certainly not limited to:
Teas/Infusions (potions)
Essential oil blends
Spell workings
Kitchen magic
Green/garden/hedge magic

Herbs and herbal essential oils can be used in magic just like other correspondences and they are not restricted to healing magic. Due to their medicinal effects, however, they are a powerful ingredient to add to any physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual healing work.

Making your own magical incense or potpourri is one of the sheer joys of working with herbs. Incense and potpourri are very similar: both combine herbs and oils to create a specific fragrance. Incense is burned, however, and so it is important to include herbs that smell good when smoked.

Incense is typically made by crushing herbs with a mortar and pestle and then combining the crushed herbs with essential oils until the right scent and consistency is reached. Potpourri, on the other hand, uses larger herb pieces and a variety of herbs that is appealing to the eye. Use a bit of orris root powder to “fix” the potpourri; it will help the smell to last.

Talismans are charms made by combining herbs, stones, and any other relevant objects into one. The collected objects are then kept in small jars, pouches, pockets, lockets, or other containers. The talisman is then charged and kept close to the person throughout the period in which it is most useful. Talismans for healing are very powerful.

Small cloth pillows can also be filled with herbs for a variety of magical and healing purposes. A dream pillow is one nice way to use this method. The pillow can be filled with relaxing, sedative herbs as well as herbs related to the water element and dreaming/intuition. Another nice pillow to make is a relaxing eye-pillow, filled with lavender and other relaxing herbs.

In addition to their medicinal properties, herbal infusions can also be used magically. The teas can be brewed at certain times or on certain days to obtain the greatest potency; the teas can include herbs selected for both their medicinal and magical value; and the teas can be used as potions or for other magical purposes during spells and rituals.

Essential Oil Blends
Like infusions, essential oil blends can be used for both medicinal and magical purposes. They can be carried in a small dram bottle, worn on the skin, used in the creation of an incense or potpourri, or burned on the diffuser during a ritual or spell.

Spell Workings
Herbs play an important role in spell workings for healing and other magical purposes. Often, herbs are charged as a part of the ritual or spell and then used. The herbs may be charged and then brewed into a magical tea. They may be charged and then used in a talisman (or vice versa). They may be used symbolically in the spell. Herbs are another tool that can be used in any variety of ways during a magical act.

Kitchen Magic
Many witches call themselves “kitchen witches” which can have duplicate meanings. One meaning is that their magic isn’t fancy
it uses just any ‘ole thing to get the job done. For me, though, kitchen witchery is also about cooking and the creation & consumption of food as a magical act.

Herbs and spices can be used in the kitchen without reservation to make food and drink both healing and magical. Herbs are particularly effective when used to induce sweating (thereby enhancing immunity) or when used to alleviate indigestion. When grown, gathered, or used with magical intention, those herbs become even more powerful.

Green/garden/hedge Magic
I have a black thumb, so this is not an area I’m very familiar with, but growing and harvesting one’s own herbs can be a very healing and magical process in and of itself.

When working with any of these magics, it is easy to “layer” the magic that you use to make your intent strong. For example, you could work a spell over many months, planting herbs at a specific time on a specific day, then harvesting the herbs in the same way. Those herbs could then be used for a specific magical working, to be executed at a specific date and time. These “layers” make the magic just that much stronger.

Recommended Resources
Herb Books
The Way of Herbs by Michael Tierra, L.Ac., OMD
The New Age Herbalist by Richard Mabey
Herbs for Health & Happiness by Mo Siegel & Nancy Burke
The Holistic Herbal by David Hoffmann
Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine by Michael Murray & Joseph Pizzorno

Magic Books
Witch’s Brew: Good Spells for Healing by Witch Bree (Brenda Knight)
Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham
Complete Book of Oil, Incense, and Brews by Scott Cunningham



Author & Research of this Article, Sif Redeagle, April 1, 2006

From the Website, Coven of the Goddess.com


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Herbal Remedies

Herbal Remedies


Studies show that this herb has antibiotic action.
how to: For tea, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon powdered root per cup, steeped 10 minutes. Up to 2 cups per day.

The “hip” is the part that remains when the petals fall off the flower. Rose hips contain vitamin C.
how to: For tea, 2 to 3 teaspoons per cup, steeped 10 minutes. Drink as needed.

This popular beverage herb can calm jangled nerves, relieve stomach distress, prevent ulcers, speed their healing, and help fight infection.
how to: For tea, 2 to 3 heaping teaspoons per cup, steeped 10 to 20 minutes. Up to 3 cups per day.

When chewed or chopped, garlic is a potent natural antibiotic; it also has anti-viral properties. It reduces cholesterol and helps prevent the formation of internal blood clots that trigger heart attacks.

how to: In food, season to taste. For tea, steep 6 cloves in a cup of cool water for 6 hours

Historically used to soothe sore throats, coughs, and upset stomachs, this beneficial bark is still available in bulk and in herbal cough drops and throat lozenges.
how to: For tea, 1 to 3 teaspoons of powdered bark per cup, boiled and simmered 15 minutes.
Up to 3 cups per day.

Ginseng stimulates the immune system, helps protect the liver from toxics, and increases stamina. In one animal experiment, it also increased sexual activity.
how to: Follow package directions for teas, capsules, tablets, and tinctures.

Despised as a weed, dandelion can help relieve premenstrual bloating.
Preliminary studies suggest possible anti-inflammatory effects.
how to: For tea, 1/2 ounce dried leaf per cup, steeped 10 minutes. Up to 3 cups per day

Several studies confirm feverfew’s value in preventing migraines.
how to: Chew two leaves a day, or take a pill or capsule containing 85milligrams of leaf material (feverfew is quite bitter). For tea, 1/2 to 1 teaspoon per cup, steeped 5 to 10 minutes.
Up to 2 cups per day.

This premier pregnancy herb is widely used to treat morning sickness and uterine irritability, and to help prevent threatened miscarriage. how to: For tea, 1 to 2 teaspoons per cup, steeped 10 minutes. Up to 3 cups per day.

For indigestion, try a cup of mint tea after eating.
how to: For tea, 1 teaspoon fresh or 2 teaspoons dried per cup, steeped 10 minutes. Reheat if desired. Up to 3 cups per day. For a relaxing bath, fill a cloth bag with a few handfuls of dried or fresh leaves, and run water over it.

This plant contains allantoin, which promotes the growth of new cells and gives it value as a wound treatment. how to: Place a bruised leaf on clean cuts or scrapes. Cover with a bandage.
Warning: Do not use internally.

This herb is a powerful laxative. Senna tastes terrible, so most herbalists recommend a tincture or accommercial product. To avoid abdominal distress, do not take more than the package directions specify.

Research has shown that this bitter herb has diuretic and urinary antiseptic effects. Use it in addition to mainstream medical treatment.
how to: One teaspoon per cup, boiled 10 minutes. Up to 3 cups per day.

Ginger prevents motion sickness and may help prevent the internal blood clots that trigger heart attacks. how to: For motion sickness, take 2 to 3 capsules of 500 milligrams 30 minutes before departure. For tea, 2 teaspoons powdered or grated root per cup, steeped 10 minutes.
Up to 3 cups per day.

commonly used to treat colds and asthma, Chinese ephedra (Ma Huang) can also raise blood pressure and cause insomnia and other problems. warning: Prior to using Chinese ephedra, seek advice from a health care practitioner, especially if you are pregnant or nursing. It should not be given to children under 13.

Licorice can soothe sore throats and treat ulcers.
how to: For sore throat, add a pinch of root to tea. For ulcers, 1/2 teaspoon of powder per cup, boiled 10 minutes. Up to 2 cups per day. warning: Large doses can be dangerous.


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Spells, herbs and Aromatherapy to Help with Fevers and Colds

Keep away Fevers {Folk Magic} # 4 

Ingredients: Honeysuckle

Another way of keeping fevers at bay, is to grow Honeysuckle above your front door, and/ or around the windows around your house.

Protection from Colds {Aromatherapy & Folk Magic} # 5

Ingredients: Eucalyptus Leaves

Another method of preventing colds from infecting you is to place eucalyptus leaves under your pillow before going to sleep. These can be fresh or dried leaves.

Flowers, Dawn (2012-03-24). The Spell Book of Wiccan Shadows (Kindle Locations 902-906). Under the Moon. Kindle Edition.

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Definitions & Making Herbal Preparations

Definitions & Making Herbal Preparations

Soak a soft cloth in a hot infusion, decoction, or 5-20 ml tincture in 500 ml hot water. Squeeze out excess water and hold pad against affected area.

A mixture of fats and water that blends with the skin to strengthen and smooth it. Use 30 g lanolin, 15 oz beeswax, 100 g. vegetable or fruit oil, and 30 ml herb water. Melt the lanolin and beeswax in a double boiler, gently stirring in the oil. Remove from heat and whisk in the herb water. Keep stirring as it cools. Store in wide mouth jars.

Made by simmering larger pieces of the herb, such as bark, roots, or twigs. Use 30 g. dried or 60 g. fresh herb to 750 ml water; simmer until the water is reduced to 500 ml. Drink 1/2 cup three times a day.

Infused oils
–Hot infusion: 250 g. dried or 500 g. fresh herb to 750 ml Olive or Vegetable Oil. Heat gently in a double boiler for 3 hours. Strain through cheesecloth into dark bottles.

–Cold infusion: Pack a large jar with the herb. Cover it with cold-pressed oil and put the lid on. Let stand in a sunny window sill for 2-3 weeks. Squeeze the oil through a jelly bag and repeat the process. Store in dark glass bottles.

A tea made by pouring boiled (not actively boiling) water over fresh or dried herbs. Use approximately 30 g. dried or 75 g. fresh herbs to 500 ml water. Drink 1/2 cup three times a day.

To make, pour 500ml of cold water over 25g of herb and leave to stand overnight. Then strain and use as you would a decoction.

Massage Oils
Use 5 drops essential oil to 20 ml carrier oil. Sweet almond, jojoba, avocado or grapeseed make good carrier oils. You can also used infused oils.

A mixture of oils and fats that forms a protective layer over the skin. Melt 500 g. petroleum jelly or soft paraffin wax in a double boiler. Add 60 g. dried herb and simmer gently for 2 hours. Strain through a jelly bag and pour into jars while still hot.

Wrap the chopped or boiled herbs, or a paste made from them, in cheesecloth or muslin before applying to the affected area. This is good for herbs that might irritate the skin, such as mustard.

Boil herbs in a little water for a hot poultice, or bruise or chop slightly for a cold one. Smooth a little oil on the skin to keep the herbs from sticking, apply the herb, and wrap with muslin or gauze strips.

Steam Inhalants
Place a few tablespoons of the dried herb in a bowl and pour boiling water over them. Drape a towel over your head and breathe in the steam.

An infusion or decoction preserved by adding sugar or honey. Use 500 ml infusion to 500 g sugar or honey; heat gently until the sweetener has dissolved. Store in dark glass bottles with cork tops; screw top bottles may explode if the mixture ferments.

Steep the fresh or dried herb in a 25% mixture of alcohol and water. Do not use methyl, grain, or rubbing alcohol as they are toxic. Vodka is ideal; rum has the added benefit of covering unpleasant flavors. Use 200 g. dried or 600 g. fresh herb to 1 liter alcohol and water. Place in a sealed jar in a cool, dark place for 2 weeks, shaking occasionally. Strain the liquid through cheesecloth and store in a dark glass bottle. Take 5 ml three times a day, diluted in a little fruit juice or water.

Tonic Wine
Pour 2 liters good quality wine, preferably red, over 500 g. dried herb, making sure all the herb is covered by the wine. Cover and leave for 2 weeks. Strain and take in 1/3 cup doses.

A tea or infusion meant only for external use. A mild form of a wash would be 1/4 ounce of herb to one pint of boiling water, steeped until lukewarm, then applied.



Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbal Remedies, Herbs | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

The Herbal First Aid Kit

The Herbal First Aid Kit

Please remember that when dealing with potentially serious injuries, first aid is a stop gap measure until adequate medical attention can be found! Follow up on any serious injuries with a qualified physician!

Break off an aloe leaf and scrape the gel to soothe minor burns, scalds, and sunburns. Aloe has tissue regenerative properties and will help heal all wounds.
Arnica cream or oil can be used on bruises or sprains where the skin is not broken. Caution should be used with Arnica however since it can become toxic in high doses. 

Calendula Cream
Homemade or storebought, this is antispetic and antifungal. If you make it, try adding comfrey to the cream; it will help speed the healing process. 

Clove Oil
Clove oil is an excellent antispetic for cuts and is also useful for treating toothaches. It should be cut with a carrier oil when used on the skin since severe irritation can occur. 

Keep squares of gauze or cheesecloth on hand to make compresses. Use comfrey, witch hazel, or arnica for sprains; St. John’s Wort for deep cuts; comfrey or witch hazel for burns. 

Crystallized Ginger
Chew for motion sickness or morning sickness. 

Eucalyptus Oil
This is a good inhalant for colds, coughs, and respiratory infections. 

Rescue Remedy
This combination of 5 of the Bach Flower Remedies is effective for shocks and emotional upsets, especially in children. 

St. John’s Wort Infused Oil
Excellent for minor burns and sunburn. 

Slippery Elm
Slippery elm powder is used to make poultices for drawing out splinters and bringing boils to a head. 

Tea Tree Oil
Antispetic and antifungal. Useful for cleansing wounds. 

Witch Hazel Extract
Use it to treat minor burns, sunburn, and insect bites. Apply to nasal passages to stop nosebleeds. Wash cuts with it to help cleanse them.
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbal Remedies, Herbs | Leave a comment

The Healthy Witch – A Tea for the Cold

Witchy Comments
A Tea for the Cold

Blend two parts dried stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) to one part dried licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and one part dried rose hips (Rosaceae). The nettle is loaded with vitamins and minerals, licorice root sweetens the tea and aids with sore throats and coughs, and rose hips are a good source of vitamin C. Drink as needed.

Another tea you can rely on to help you through a cold would be yarrow (Achillea millefolium). It’s
useful in offering relief for cold and flu symptoms, fevers, and respiratory infections. Yarrow grows abundantly just about anywhere, so it’s easy to gather in fields or grow in your own garden. Use the dried flowering tops and dried leaves off the top ⅓ of the plant. You can prepare a standard tea and drink 2 to 4 ounces at a time up to 5 times daily. If you prefer, you can take it as a tincture, 10 to 40 drops, up to 5 times a day.

Herbs Gone Wild! Ancient Remedies Turned Loose
Diane Kidman

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbal Remedies, Natural Healing | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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