Herbs

Herb of the Day for October 22nd – Marsh Mallow

Herb of the Day

Marsh Mallow


Leaves, root, flowers.
The leaves are picked in August, when the flowers are just coming into
bloom. They should be stripped off singly and gathered in the morning,
after the dew has been dried off by the sun.


Medicinal Uses: Marsh Mallow is useful in inflammation and irritation of the alimentary canal, and of the urinary and respiratory organs. The dry roots boiled in water give out half their weight of a gummy matter like starch. Decoctions of the plant, especially of the root, are very useful where the natural mucus has been abraded from the coats of the intestines.
The decoction can be made by adding 5 pints of water to 1/4 lb. of dried root, boiling down to 3 pints and straining: it should not be made too thick and viscid.
It is very useful in painful complaints of the urinary tract, exerting a relaxing effect upon the passages. This decoction is also effective in curing bruises, sprains or any ache in the muscles or sinews. In cases of hemorrhage from the urinary tract and in dysentery, it has been recommended to use the powdered root boiled in milk. The action of Marsh Mallow root upon the bowels is unequaled by any other astringency. Mallow is a very soothing demulcent. It can be used internally as a cough preparation.
The flowers, boiled in oil and water, with a little honey and alum, have proved good as a gargle for sore throats. Teas made from marsh mallow may be taken up to three times a day. Marsh mallow leaf tea may be made by adding 2 to 5 teaspoons of dried leaf to about 5 ounces of hot but not boiling water, allowing it to soak for 10 minutes, and then straining out the solid particles. For marsh mallow root tea, place 2 to 5 teaspoons of the dried powdered root in about 5 ounces of warm water and let it soak for at least an hour before straining out the solids. The resulting tea may be heated or consumed cold. Drink three to five cups a day.
For use on the skin, shredded or powdered marsh mallow root may be mixed with enough warm water to form a thick paste, which may be spread onto a soft cloth. The resulting poultice may be heated or simply applied to irritated skin as often as needed. If the skin at the area where marsh mallow is applied blisters or becomes more irritated, the marsh mallow preparation should be washed off with warm water and it should not be re-applied.

Marsh Mallow may possibly reduce blood sugar levels, individuals with diabetes should be careful when taking it.

Magickal Uses: Place a bouquet of mallow in a vase in your window to attract a straying lover.

Culinary Uses: The mallow root was used to make the French candy, pâté de guimauve, which is the original “marshmallow.” The root is also good lightly steamed and then fried with butter and onions. Add the tender young leaves to salads.

Properties: Demulcent, anti-inflammatory and emollient.  Marsh Mallow contains starch, mucilage, pectin, oil, sugar, asparagin, phosphate of lime, glutinous matter and cellulose.

Growth: Marsh Mallow is a very hardy perennial. It likes moist, light soil with a neutral pH in full sun. The Marsh Mallow plants consist of tall, thick stems with broad leaves that are covered in soft hairs.
Source:
Author: Crick

 

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Herb of the Day for October 19th – Cloves

Herb of the Day

Cloves



Medicinal Uses: Clove oil will stop a toothache when it is applied directly to the cavity. It is very warm and stimulating to the system, and is very useful with people who have cold extremities. Cloves will promote sweating with fevers, colds, and flu. It is often used in remedies for whooping cough. Cloves are also safe and effective for relieving vomiting during pregnancy. Cloves are also well known for their antispasmodic and stimulative properties. The oil contains eugenol, a strong anesthetic and antiseptic substance. Add clove oil to neutral oils for topical pain relief of arthritis. Small amounts of clove in a tea for nausea. 3 cloves in two cups of boiled water, steeped for 20 minutes, as an antiseptic and mouthwash. Former alcoholics can suck on one or two cloves when the craving strikes to curb the desire. Clove kills intestinal parasites and exhibits broad antimicrobial properties against fungi and bacteria supporting its traditional use as a treatment for diarrhea, intestinal worms, and other digestive ailments.

Magickal uses:  Cloves worn in an amulet will drive away negativity and hostility, and stop gossip. It is often carried to stimulate the memory, and can be added to attraction sachets. Clove oil is also worn as an aphrodisiac, and the buds when eaten are said to stir up bodily lusts. It is placed in sachets with mint and rose to chase away melancholy and to help one sleep soundly. Carried, it can also bring comfort to the bereaved and mourning. Carry in a pouch or amulet to attract love. Clove is masculine and associated with the element of Fire. It is ruled by the planet Jupiter.

Properties: Antiseptic, mind and body stimulant, analgesic, antibacterial, carminative. Clove oil is 60 to 90 percent eugenol, which is the source of its anesthetic and antiseptic properties.

Growth: Clove trees are originally from Indonesia. The dried flower buds, clove, are extensively used as spice.

Infusion: Use 1 teaspoon of powdered herb per cup of boiling water. Steep 10 to 20 minutes. Drink up to 3 cups a day.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for October 17th – Eucalyptus

Herb of the Day

Eucalyptus 

                             
Medicinal Uses: Eucalyptus oil is a powerful antiseptic, and is used to treat pyorrhea (gum disease), and is used on burns to prevent infections. The oil breathed in will help clear the sinuses, as will the steam from boiling the leaves. The leaves and their preparations have been successfully used as a tonic and gently stimulating stomachic, in atonic dyspepsia, and in catarrh of the stomach and typhoid fever; also advised in mucous catarrhal affections generally; in pseudo-membranous laryngitis, in asthma, with profuse secretion, and in chronic bronchitis, with or without emphysema, and in whooping-cough; it has likewise proved efficient in chronic catarrh of the bladder, where the urine is high-colored, contains an abnormal amount of mucus, or, perhaps, some purulent matter, and micturation is attended with much pain.

When mixed with water or vegetable oils, it makes a good insect repellant. A small drop on the tongue eases nausea. Externally applied, the oil gives relief in some forms of neuralgic and rheumatic pains. The oil is often combined with Thymus.

Magickal uses: Healing energies come from the leaves. A branch or wreath over the bed of a sick person will help spread the healing energies. The oil is added to healing baths, and for purifications. Stuff healing poppets and carry for good health. Ringing three green candles with the leaves and pods may relieve colds. Then burn the candles all the way to the socket while visualizing the inflicted person. For sore throats, wear a necklace made of the green pods, strung on green thread. Place pods beneath your pillow to protect against colds. Carry the leaves for protection.

Properties:Antiseptic, deodorant, expectorant, stimulant, anti-microbial, anti-spasmodic, febrifuge.                      
Contains volatile oil, the major component of which is l,8-cineole (=eucalyptol), 70-85%; with terpineole, a-pinene, p-cymene and small amounts of sesquiterpenes such as ledol, aromadendrene and viridoflorol; aldehydes, ketones and alcohols. Polyphenolic acids; caffeic, ferulic, gallic, protocatechuic and others. And flavonoids including eucalyptin, hyperoside and rutin.

Growth: Eucalyptus reigns among the tallest trees in the world, capable of reaching heights of over 250 feet tall. It thrives only in areas where the average temperature remains above 60 degrees, and is adaptable to several soil conditions. The trunk is covered with peeling papery bark. The leaves on the young plant, up to 5 years old, are opposite, sessile, soft, oblong, pointed, and a hoary blue color. The mature leaves are alternate, petioled, leathery, and shaped like a scimitar. The flowers are solitary, axillary, and white, with no petals and a woody calyx. The fruit is a hard, four-celled, many-seeded capsule enclosed in the calyx cup.

Boil mature leaves In water and condense the vapor to recover the oil.

An infusion may be made with 1-2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves to a cup of boiling water. Let infuse for 10-15 minutes. The dose of tincture is 1 ml. three times a day.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for Oct. 16th – Boneset

Herb of the Day

 

Boneset

Agueweed, Feverwort, Sweating plant           

                         
Medicinal Uses: Boneset is one the best remedies for the relief of the associated symptoms that accompany influenza. It will speedily relieve the aches and pains as well as aid the body in dealing with any fever that is present. One to two tablespoons of the tincture in hot water is used for sweat therapy to break fevers. Taken cold, the infusion has tonic and mildly laxative effects. Taken warm, it is diaphoretic and emetic and can be used to break up a common cold, for intermittent fever, cough, and for the flu. Promotes sweating, and relaxes peripheral blood vessels. Also used for muscle cramps, sore throat, cough, headache and stuffy nose.

Boneset is emetic and laxative in large doses and may contain controversial and potentially liver-harming pyrrolizidine alkaloid.

Magickal uses: An infusion sprinkled around the house will drive away evil spirits and negativity. To break a hex or evil curse, fill a red flannel bag with equal parts ague weed, dog rose, and five finger grass when the moon is waning. Seal the bag. Consecrate and charge it. Carry the bag or wear it daily. Boneset is a feminine herb. Its ruling planet is Saturn and its element is Water.

Properties: Laxative, antispasmodic, expectorant, vasoconstrictor, cholagogue, cathartic, emetic, febrifuge, tonic, aperient, diaphoretic, diuretic, nervine, carminative, stimulant.                                                                              
Contains sesquiterpene lactones ; eupafolin, euperfolitin, eufoliatin, eufoliatorin, euperfolide, eucannabinolide and helenalin. Immunostimulatory polysaccharides, mainly 4-0-methylglucuroxylans. Flavonoids; quercitin, kaempferol, hyperoside, astragalin, rutin, eupatorin & others. And diterpenes – dendroidinic acid, hebenolide, sterols and volatile oil.

Growth: Boneset prefers damp to moist rich soils. It is a North American native perennial that reaches 2 to 4 feet high, and grows in partial sun.  The rough, hairy stem grows to a height of 1-5 feet from a horizontal, crooked rootstock. The leaves are 4-8 inches long, rough, serrate, and taper to a long point. Leaves perfoliate (stem appears to be inserted through the middle of leaf pairs), wrinkled. Terminal corymbs of numerous, fuzzy, white or pale purple flower heads are borne in dense, flat-topped clusters terminating the stems, blossoms appear in August and September. The fruit is a tufted achene. It is found in swampy areas, moist meadows, low-lying damp ground, wet woods, and along stream banks in eastern North America.

Infusion: use 1 level tsp. herb with 1 cup boiling water; steep for 30 minutes and strain. As a tonic, take cold, 1 tsp. 3-6 times a day.

A salve for external application may be made by combining equal parts of the powdered herb and Vaseline.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for Oct. 14th – Rosemary

Herb of the Day

Rosemary      

(Rosmarinus officinalis)

 
The name comes from the Latin ros, “dew”, and maris, “ocean”, meaning “dew of the sea”. In the sixth century Charlemagne decreed that rosemary should be grown in all the imperial gardens. Christian legend claims that flowers were originally white but were
turned varying shade of blue when Mary hung her blue cloak over a rosemary bush.                                                                                                                                                   
Medicinal Uses: Rosemary is a stimulant of the circulatory system. It is used to treat bites and stings externally. Internally it is used to treat migraines, bad breath, and to stimulate the sexual organs. The tea makes a mouthwash for bad breath. It is also used to treat nervous disorders, upset stomachs, and is used to regulate the menstrual cycle and to ease cramps. The oil benefits stomach and nerves. Use rosemary in salves for eczema, wounds, and sores. Mix the crushed leaves generously into meats, fish, potato salads, etc. at your next picnic to prevent food poisoning. The essential oil is used in aromatherapy as an inhalant and decongestant, and to enhance memory and clear concentration. It is also used in lotions to ease arthritis and muscle pain. It is a strong antiseptic, and good in shampoos and hair rinses. An infusion of the leaves has also been used, alone or with borax, as a scalp wash to prevent baldness.                
Steep the herb in white wine for a week and strain. Rub the rosemary wine into gouty or paralyzed limbs. Taken internally, the wine quiets the heart and stimulates the kidneys, brain, and nervous system. Rosemary tea relieves depression. The leaf and flowers are stimulating to the liver and the digestion. For this reason, rosemary is a classic herb for migraine headache when associated with liver or stomach torpidity.                                                            
Rosemary increases the circulation and slightly raises the blood pressure. To make the tea, steep two teaspoons of the dried flowering tops in one cup of water for twenty minutes. Take one-fourth cup four times a day. Rosemary and coltsfoot are smoked as herbal tobacco to relieve asthma and lung conditions. Rosemary essential oil is often blended with cedar wood, geranium, ginger, lemon balm, myrtle and sweet basil.

When used as a tea, the dose should not exceed one cup per day. Overdose can cause fatal poisoning. Even small doses of Rosemary oil can cause stomach, kidney and intestinal problems, and large amounts may be poisonous. If you’re pregnant, avoid using the herb altogether.

Magickal uses: Rosemary is an herb of consecration and purification from disease. As an herb of purification, rosemary can be a substitute for frankincense. Add it to incense and to the ritual chalice and distributed to guests. Burning it before performing magick will rid the area of negativity. It is carried in the hand during funerals and cast into the grave, as the coffin is lower into it. Rosemary or rosemary with juniper berries is burned as a protection from disease. Stuff healing poppets with rosemary for increased healing strength. Rub the hands with an infusion before beginning the healing process. Place it in books and drawers to repel moths. Place under the pillow or bed for restful sleep and protection from nightmares. Hang at the doors to repel thieves and disease. Wearing a chaplet improves the memory. The aroma of the wood preserves youth. Add it to the bath for this and its purifying qualities. Add to mixtures for love or lust. An answer may be divined by inhaling the smoke of rosemary. Wrap the powdered leaves in a piece of linen and wear on the right arm to be rid of depression and to generally improve the emotions. Rosemary in all of its forms is used for protection and banishment. Rosemary leaves under your pillow do away with evil spirits and bad dreams. It is hung on porches and doors to keep thieves out. Rosemary is grown to attract elves.

Properties: Stimulant, diaphoretic, carminative, nervine, aromatic, cephalic antispasmodic. Contains volatile oil: composed of borneol, camphene, camphor, cineole, limonene, linalool, isobutyl acetate, 3-octanone, terpineol, verbenol, flavonoids: apigenin, diosmetin, diosmin, genkwanin, 6-methoxygenkwanin, hispidulin, sinensetin, luteolin and derivatives. Rosmarinic acid and other phenolic acids, diterpenes such as picrosalvin (carnosol), carnosolic acid and rosmariquinone

Growth: Rosemary is a perennial that prefers mild climates, so it needs to be grown indoors where the winters are harsh, or very heavily mulched. It reaches 2-4 feet in height, and is tolerable of poor soils. Rosemary has narrow, needle-like leaves and lovely blue flowers. Cut back after flowering to keep it from becoming leggy. It is an evergreen shrub with numerous branches; ash-colored. scaly bark and bears opposite, leathery, thick leaves which are lustrous and dark green above and downy white underneath. They have a prominent vein in the middle and margins which are rolled down. The pale blue, sometimes white, relatively small, flowers grow in short axillary racemes, arranged in false whorls on the upper parts of the branches, blooming during April and May, or later in cooler climates.

Infusion: steep 1 tsp. dried flowering tops or leaves in 1/2 cup water. Take up to 1 cup per day.

Tea: prepare ordinary tea, put a pinch of ground ginger in the drink for variety. Drink 3 or 4 cups per day.

Tincture: a dose is from 5 to 20 drops.
Source:
Author: Crick

 

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Herb of the Day for October 2nd – Cinnamon

Herb of the Day

Cinnamon


                                       
Add cinnamon to remedies for acute symptoms, as this herb is a stimulant to other herbs and the body, enabling herbal remedies to work faster. It is also a blood purifier, an infection preventive, and a digestive aid. Cinnamon is used as a mouthwash, and is good for upset stomach.
For a cold medication simmer sticks with cloves for 3 min, add 2 tsp lemon juice, 2 tsp honey, 2 tbsp whiskey.   Cinnamon is also good for yeast infection and athlete’s foot. A 2% solution will kill both of these conditions. Boil 8-10 sticks in 4 cups water, simmer 5 min, steep 45 min, then douche or apply to athlete’s foot. Cinnamon reduces cancer causing tendencies of many food additives.

Do not ingest cinnamon oil.

Magickal uses: The ancient Hebrews used cinnamon oil as part of a holy anointing oil. The Egyptians also used the oil during the mummification process. The Romans wove the leaves into wreaths, which were used to decorate the temples. Burned in incense, cinnamon will promote high spirituality. It is also used to stimulate the passions of the male. It should also be burned in incenses used for healing. The essential oil is used for protection.

Properties: Warming stimulant, carminative, antispasmodic, antiseptic, anti-viral, alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiseptic, anti-rheumatic, aromatic, astringent, demulcent, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, expectorant, germicide, hemostatic, stimulant, stomachic

Growth: Cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka, growing in tropical forest and being extensively cultivated throughout the tropical regions of the world.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for Sept. 30th is Chickory

Herb of the Day

Chicory

 

Medicinal Uses: The herb was cultivated in Egypt over 5000 years ago, and was known to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who used it as a salad ingredient and a vegetable. Its use as a coffee substitute is thought to date from 1806 when Napoleon’s Continental blockade prevented imports of coffee. It was widely used for the same purpose during the World Wars.  

Chicory tea taken internally is believed to be effective in treating jaundice and liver problems. A tea made from roots or leaves appears to be useful for those with digestive problems.  Save a little tea and try dipping a cotton ball into it for a refreshing and soothing eye wash. You can also add a spoonful or two of  honey to thicken and use as syrup for a mild laxative for kids. For external use, bruise fresh Chicory leaves and apply to areas affected by gout, skin eruptions, swellings, skin inflammations, and rheumatism. The dried, crushed root is made into infusions and decoctions for digestive upsets and to improve appetite. A tea made from the flowers promotes the production of bile, the release of gallstones, and the elimination of excessive internal mucus. Homeopathically it is used for the help in relieving liver and gall bladder ailments.

Magickal uses: Gather in perfect silence at noon or midnight on Midsummer using a gold knife. Take the herb
gathered this way and place it against locked boxes or doors to open them. Carry to remove obstacles in your life. Carry specially cut chicory to become invisible. Spread chicory juice over your body to gain favors from a great person. Carry to promote frugalness. Place fresh flowers on altar or burn as incense. Chicory is masculine, ruled by the Sun and is associated with the element of Air.

Properties: Tonic, stimulant, laxative, appetizer, astringent, carminitive, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, hepatic.

Growth: Chicory is a perennial herb.Chicory, or succory, known botanically as Cichorium intybus L., is a perennial member of the daisy family (Asteraceae), native to Europe but now found growing wild along roadsides and in neglected fields throughout North America. Attaining a height of three to five feet or more, it is conspicuous for its attractive azure blue flowers.

Laxative: 2 Tbsp Root to 2 cups Water. Let come just to a boil, take off burner and let cool. Take 1 to 1 1/2 cups a day, a mouthful at a time.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for September 23rd – Aloe Vera

Herb of the Day

 Aloe Vera                                                                                                                            

                                                                                         

In ancient Egypt aloe was used during embalming processes, and also for soothing and  beautifying the skin. Cleopatra attributed her irresistible charm and beauty to the use of aloe vera gel.                                                    

Medicinal Uses: The gel of the inner part of an aloe leaf is used to treat burns, skin rashes, acne,  abrasions, eczema, sunburns and insect bites, as well as chafed nipples from  breastfeeding, when applied to the affected area externally.   Aloe has shown outstanding results in treating facial edema (swelling). Internally it can be used to keep the bowels functioning smoothly, or when there is an impaction, although it can cause intestinal cramping when taken internally. It aids in cleaning out the colon. It aids in healing wounds by drawing out infection, and preventing infection from starting. Rubbing the scalp with aloe keeps the hair from falling out. The fresh gel of Aloe was used by Cleopatra to keep her skin soft and young.

Magickal uses: Growing an Aloe Vera plant in the kitchen will help prevent burns and mishaps while cooking. It will also prevent household accidents, and guard against negative energy.

Properties: Emollient, purgative, vulnerary, tonic, demulcent, vermifuge, antifungal, alterative, emmenagogue.  Aloe vera has six antiseptic agents (sulphur, lupeol, salicylic acid, cinnamic acid, urea nitrogen and phenol) which acts in unison to provide antimicrobial activity.                                                                                                     

Growth: Does best when grown indoors in pots. Remember that Aloe is a succulent, not a cactus, so it needs water to keep the leaves fleshy and juicy. The aloe is a perennial plant that produces a rosette of fleshy basal leaves. The narrow-lancelet leaves are 1- 2 feet long and whitish-green on both sides, and they bear spiny teeth on the margins.

Diabetics may develop intolerance to aloe juice.
Source:
Author: Crick

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