Herbs

Herb of the Day for Aug. 28th is Dill

Herb of the Day

                                    Dill                                   


Medicinal Uses: An ancient Egyptian remedy in the Ebers papyrus (c. 1500 BC) recommends dill as one of the ingredients in a pain-killing mixture. The Romans knew dill as “anethum” which  latter became “anise”.                        
Dill is used to treat colic, gas, and indigestion. Dill has always been considered a remedy for the stomach, relieving wind and calming the digestion. Dill’s essential oil  relieves intestinal spasms and griping and helps to settle colic, hence it is often used in gripe water mixtures.           
Chewing the seeds improves bad breath. Dill makes a useful addition to cough, cold and flu remedies, and is a mild diuretic.                                                                                                                                                                                 
Dill increases milk production, and when taken regularly by nursing mothers, helps to prevent colic in their babies. To stimulate the flow of breast milk in nursing mothers bring one pint of white wine almost to a boil, remove from heat and add 1 tsp each of anise, caraway, coriander and dill. Bring one pint of white wine almost to a boil, remove from heat and add 4 tsp of dill seeds, let steep 30 minutes and strain. Drink 1 ½ cups a half hour before retiring to sleep well. Chewing dill seeds removes bad breath. Dill can also be made into a Tea, and sweetened with honey, or prepared as an infusion by steeping 2 teaspoons of seed in 1 cup of water for 10-15 minutes, then straining.  Take 1- 2 cups per day.

Magickal uses: Dill is used in love and protection sachets. The dried seed heads hung in the home, over doorways, and above cradles provides protection. Add dill to your bath to make you irresistible to your lover. Place in the baby’s cradle for protection. Use in money spells.

Properties: Digestive, antibacterial, antispasmodic, diuretic. Contains volatile oil, consisting mainly of carvone with dihydrocarvone, limonene, a- and b-phellandrene, eugenol, anethole, myristicin, carveole, x-pinene. Flavonoids: kaempferol and its blucuronide, vicenin. Coumarins such as scopoletin, esculetin, bergapten, umbelliferone. Xanthone derivatives such as dillanoside. And triterpenes, phenolic acids, protein and fixed oil.

Growth: Dill grows in most regions of North America. It needs sun and a well-drained soil, and frequent waterings. It is a hardy annual, biennial in the deep southern regions, that reaches 2 – 3 feet tall. The leaves are bluish-green, bi-pinnate with fili-form leaflets; the base dilates into a sheath surrounding the stem. Flat, compound umbels of yellow flowers appear from July to September, producing eventually the oval, ribbed dill seeds. Dill matures quickly, and self-sows for the following year. Plant in six week intervals for a season-long supply of fresh dill.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for August 26th is Oregon Grape

Herb of the Day

Oregon Grape

 

Medicinal uses: Oregon Grape serves as an excellent alternative, it contains the immune-stimulating, infection-fighting antiseptic constituent, berberine. Oregon grape root is used in the treatment of bacterial diarrhea, intestinal parasites, and eye infections. It has a sedative effect on the smooth muscles lining the digestive tract and can relieve stomach cramps and abdominal pain. Oregon grape root contains tannins that ease inflammation, irritation, and itching of the skin and digestive tract. An ointment made from Oregon grape can be effective for the treatment of mild to moderate psoriasis. Due to its content of alkaloids and podophyllins, Oregon grape is reputed to have anticancer properties.

Magickal uses: The gender of Oregon Grape is feminine and its Element is Earth. Oregon Grape is used for money and prosperity spells.

Properties: Oregon Grape is anti-diarrheal, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-parasitic, anti-inflammatory, astringent,  digestive (cholagogue, bitter), hypoglycemic and laxative (in larger doses). Oregon grape contains isoquinoline alkaloids (including berberine, berbamine, and hydrastine).

Growth: Oregon grape is a member of the barberry family. It is a woody perennial shrub that is native to the United States, it exists in three forms: upright, dwarf, and creeping. The typical Oregon grape, is 90 cm (3 feet) or more tall and is native to the Pacific coast of North America. The Oregon grape shrub can grow to almost 6 feet in height, though average height is about 3 to 4 feet. It doesn’t mind sun or shade and is best with regular water but drought tolerant. It has edible berries that can be made into jam. The flower color of the Oregon Grape is yellow.

Oregon Grape should not be used by pregnant women, and individuals with chronic medical conditions. Those folks taking prescription medications should check with their health care providers prior to using Oregon grape.
Source:
Author: Crick


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Herb of the Day for Aug. 25th is Honeysuckle

Herb of the Day

             Honeysuckle                   


                                                                                                                                                                                        
Medicinal Uses: The flowers have a broad-spectrum antimicrobial effect against salmonella, staphylococcus, and streptococcus. The leaves & flowers are rich in salicylic acid, so may be used to relieve headaches, colds, flu, fever, pain, arthritis & rheumatism. Chinese herbalists have long recognized honeysuckle as an antibiotic herb for colds, flu, and fevers. At the onset of a cold, honeysuckle should be taken in combination with chrysanthemum flowers.
                 
Sore throats, conjunctivitis, and inflammations of the bowel, urinary tract and reproductive organs have been treated with it. It is said to be useful in treating cancer. Combine it with seeds of Forsythia suspensii, the well-known yellow flowering shrub, or Echinacea augustifolia or E. purpura for maximum antiviral and antibacterial effect. Steep two teaspoons per cup for twenty minutes. The dose is a quarter cup, four times a day. Used by Native Americans to treat fever, tuberculosis, menstrual difficulties, kidney stones, dysuria, venereal disease, and worms; and used as a cathartic, diuretic, and as an emetic “to throw off effects of love medicine”.
                            
Honeysuckle works well against internal infections, and it can also be used externally for skin irritation and infections. Honeysuckle has been found useful in alleviating rashes ranging from skin diseases to poison oak. For these types of skin ailments, honeysuckle is best used as a poultice. For cuts and abrasions that may become infected, a honeysuckle infusion can be applied externally. It is in treating skin infections that the stems of honeysuckle are used.

Although the berries of some species are known to be edible; generally, ingestion of the fruit causes mild to moderate nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; death is unlikely.

Magickal uses: Add to incense or spells for divination or increased mental abilities. Honeysuckle is a masculine herb that is ruled by the planet Jupiter and is associated with the element of Earth. Honeysuckle in the home draws prosperity. Rub lightly crushed flowers on the forehead to heighten psychic power. Growing the plant in your yard will bring good luck, over the door it keeps fevers from the occupants.

Properties: detoxifier, alterative, antipyretic

Growth: Woody vine with perfoliate leaves at twig tips; yellow-orange trumpet flowers at twig tips followed by orange-red berries.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for August 23 is Hemlock

Herb of the Day

Hemlock                               


                                                                                                                                                                                                            
Socrates drank the juice of poisonous hemlock in order to commit suicide.                                                                   

Medicinal Uses: The whole plant has been used as a traditional folk cancer remedy, narcotic, sedative, analgesic, spasmolytic, anti-aphrodisiac. Hemlock has been used as an antidote for strychnine poisoning. The antidotes for Hemlock are emetics of zinc, castor oil, mustard, tannic acid and stimulants such as coffee.

Poison hemlock is a deadly poison. Ingestion can be lethal. Contact can cause dermatitis; juice is highly toxic. The young poison hemlock plant closely resembles Osha root.

Magickal uses: Once used to induce astral projections and to destroy sexual drives. Rub the juice (be sure to protect your hands) onto magickal knives and swords to empower and purify them before use. Hemlock is ruled by Saturn and associated with the Goddess Hecate.

Properties: astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic. Contains the poison alkaloid, coniine, conhydrine and methyl-coniine.

Growth: A species of evergreen plant; the volatile oil extracted from dried, unripe fruit of Conium maculatum, poison hemlock or a poison made from the hemlock. A European plant with compound umbels of small, white flowers and finely divided leaves. A branched perennial, 2-6 feet tall. Stems are hollow, grooved; purple-spotted. Leaves are carrot-like, but in overall outline more like an equilateral triangle, and with more divisions; leaves ill-scented when bruised. Leafstalks are hairless. Flowers are white, in umbels; May to August. Similar in appearance to caraway, valerian, Queen Anne’s lace, wild carrot, etc. Care should be taken in identifying the hemlock plant; Poison Hemlock is found in waste ground in most of the United States. A good way to distinguish the plant is by the fetid mouse-like smell it emits and by the dark purplish spots that pepper the stem.
Source:
Author: Cricket
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Herb of the Day for August 20th – Broom

Herb of the Day

 Broom

                 Scotch broom, Butcher’s broom, Irish broom                  


Medicinal Uses: Broom is used for circulatory disorders, gout, leg cramps, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, phlebitis, thrombosis, and jaundice. When used with uva-ursi, cleavers, and dandelion, it makes an excellent remedy for cleansing the kidneys and bladder, and to increase the flow of urine. It is a cardiac depressant used to quiet an overactive heart.

Large doses can cause vomiting, purging, weakening heart, lowered nerve strength and low blood pressure. Large doses have been reported to cause fatal poisoning.

Magickal uses: Broom is a masculine herb ruled by the planet Mars. It is associated with the element of Air. Carry bunches of green broom tied up in colorful ribbons at weddings. Use stalks to clean ritual area. Broom is one of the nine fairy herbs, and a cologne prepared from its flowers is said to inspire affection. Broom is a shamanic herb that is smoked prior to meditation. Store the flowers in a sealed container for 10 days until dry prior to use. Throw into the air and invoke the spirits of Air to raise the wind, or burn and bury the ashes to calm the wind.

Properties: The tops are cathartic and diuretic. The seed is cathartic and emetic. Broom contains alkaloids, hydroxylramine, 42% potash, and ruscogenins, tannin, bitter principle, and traces of an essential oil.

Growth: An attractive, evergreen shrub, it has bright green, almost leafless stems; erect green branches from which oval leaflets grow, with bright yellow pea-like flowers, much favored by butterflies, blooms in April to June. The height ranges from 3 to10 feet. The fruit is a brownish-black, shaggy pod contains 12-18 seeds. Requires full sun, prefers poor soil with perfect drainage.

The tops of young branches should be picked, and an infusion made using 3 tsp. to 3/4 pint of water. Dosage is a tbsp. night and morning.

Decoction: prepared from the root, boil 1 tsp flowering tops or seeds in 1 cup water. Dosage is a tbsp. night and morning. Or take 1 to 2 cups per day, a mouthful at at time.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for August 18th is Chickweed

Herb of the Day

 Chickweed           


                                                            
Medicinal Uses: Chickweed is an excellent source of many B vitamins and various minerals. It is used to treat bronchitis, pleurisy, coughs, colds, and as a blood builder. Externally it is good for skin diseases, and the tea added to the bath is good for soothing skin irritations and rashes. Chickweed had been used for external application for inflamed substances, skin diseases, boils, scalds, burns, inflamed or sore eyes, erysipelas, tumors, piles, cancer, swollen testes, ulcerated throat and mouth, and all kinds of wounds.                                                                                                  
The fresh herb is made into a salve to relieve eczema. Also used for  hoarseness, bowels, constipation and blood disorders. It is used to “draw the poison out” of infections, inflammations, boils, or abcesses. Any form of internal inflammation is soothed and healed by application of chickweed as an external poultice. Traditional Chinese herbalists used a tea made from chickweed to treat nosebleeds.

Magickal uses: Chickweed is carried and/or used in spells to attract love and to maintain a relationship. Excellent offering for those that work with birds or avian spirit guides. Chickweed is associated with the element Water. It is a feminine herb and ruled by the Moon.

Properties: Alterative, demulcent, refrigerant, mucilaginous, pectoral, resolvent, discutient and antiscorbutic. Contains lecithin, is a source of phosphorus and potash salts, flavonoids and is high in Vitamin C.

Growth: Chickweed is an annual or biennial weed found in abundance all over the world. It prefers full sun, average to poor soils, and infrequent watering. Chickweed stems, usually less than 1 foot  tall, are so weak that the whole plant leans on other plants or adjacent firm supporting surfaces, often forming a tangled mass. Wherever the stem touches the ground the nodes give rise to roots and new stems. The stem has a row of hairs that change sides at the nodes. The opposite leaves are ovate to oblong in shape. The higher leaves are largely sessile, while those lower down on the stem have hairy petioles. The flowers, about 1/8 inch  in diameter, consist of five petals, but each petal is so deeply cleft that the blossoms look ten-pointed. The white petals are shorter than the green sepals.

Decoction: Boil 3 heaping Tbsp in 1 qt water till one pint remains; take 1 cupful warm every 3 hours or more often until bowels move.

or

Take a handful of fresh herb and add to boiling water; steep and take in half-cup doses twice a day till relief is gained.

Salve#1
Fresh chickweed which has been chopped and slowly warmed in petroleum jelly or lard; put into containers; first aid for cuts, nicks, bites and scratches.

Salve #2
Place 12 oz. fresh chickweed in 1 pint of olive, sweet almond or other suitable vegetable oil in ovenproof container; heat at 150 degrees F for 3 hours; strain and add 1/2 oz. melted beeswax to oil; stir as mixture thickens; used for soothing itches and rashes.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for August 17th is Allspice

Herb of the Day

Allspice

           Pimento, Jamaica pepper            

 

Allspice is used as a paste to soothe and relieve toothache, as well as a mouthwash to freshen the
breath. The rind contains the most active medicinal components and is considered to be stimulant in
action, particularly the aroma. The tea has antiseptic properties (due to the eugenol content in the berries) and is used primarily as a digestive aid for flatulence, intestinal gas and indigestion. The tea is also used as an appetite stimulant, and as a carminative. Both the tea and a poultice are used for rheumatism and neuralgia.Allspice lowers blood sugar (useful in diabetes) and improves protein absorption. The leaves are used in the bath for varicose veins, gout, and edema. The eugenol content is said to promote digestive enzymes in the body.

Magickal uses: Allspice encourages healing and is used in mixtures to ask for money and good fortune. Also used in determination and healing spells

Properties: Aromatic, carminative, stimulant

Growth: Allspice is harvested from a tree that is native to Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. Allspice is the dried berry of the pimento, an evergreen tree growing to 40 feet in height. It bears opposite, leathery, oblong to oblong-lancelet leaves whose pinnately arranged veins show prominently on the underside. Small white flowers grow in many-flowered cymes in the upper leaf axils from June to August. The fruit is a fleshy, sweet berry which is purplish-black when ripe.

Poultice: Boil berries and make a thick paste. Spread on a soft clean cloth. The cloth can also be dipped in warm tea and used as hot pack                                                

Pimento water: Combine 5 parts crushed berries with 200 parts water and distill down to half the original volume. A dose is from 1-2 fluid ounces.                                                                                     

Oil: A dose is from 2-5 drops. For flatulence, take 2 or 3 drops on sugar                                                    

Powder: A dose is from 10-30 grains
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for August 7th is Hemlock *Poisonous*

Herb of the Day

                       Hemlock                              


                                                                                                                                                  
Socrates drank the juice of poisonous hemlock in order to commit suicide.                                                                   

Medicinal Uses: The whole plant has been used as a traditional folk cancer remedy, narcotic, sedative, analgesic, spasmolytic, anti-aphrodisiac. Hemlock has been used as an antidote for strychnine poisoning. The antidotes for Hemlock are emetics of zinc, castor oil, mustard, tannic acid and stimulants such as coffee.

Poison hemlock is a deadly poison. Ingestion can be lethal. Contact can cause dermatitis; juice is highly toxic. The young poison hemlock plant closely resembles Osha root.

Magickal uses: Once used to induce astral projections and to destroy sexual drives. Rub the juice (be sure to protect your hands) onto magickal knives and swords to empower and purify them before use. Hemlock is ruled by Saturn and associated with the Goddess Hecate.

Properties: astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic. Contains the poison alkaloid, coniine, conhydrine and methyl-coniine.

Growth: A species of evergreen plant; the volatile oil extracted from dried, unripe fruit of Conium maculatum, poison hemlock or a poison made from the hemlock. A European plant with compound umbels of small, white flowers and finely divided leaves. A branched perennial, 2-6 feet tall. Stems are hollow, grooved; purple-spotted. Leaves are carrot-like, but in overall outline more like an equilateral triangle, and with more divisions; leaves ill-scented when bruised. Leafstalks are hairless. Flowers are white, in umbels; May to August. Similar in appearance to caraway, valerian, Queen Anne’s lace, wild carrot, etc. Care should be taken in identifying the hemlock plant; Poison Hemlock is found in waste ground in most of the United States. A good way to distinguish the plant is by the fetid mouse-like smell it emits and by the dark purplish spots that pepper the stem.
Source:
Author: Crick

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbs | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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