The Gods

Deity of the Day for December 15th – Saturn, The Roman God

Deity of the Day

The Roman God, Saturn

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Deity of the Day for December 14th is Mithras, Early Roman Sun God

Deity of the Day

Mithras

The Legend of Mithras

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Deity of the Day for Dec. 8th – Mani, Norse God of the Moon

Deity of the Day

Mani

 

Mani is the Norse god of the moon. He is described as the personification of the physical moon, and he is Sunna’s brother. He is also referred to as the “shining god.” Mani’s lunar magick holds a softer, shadowy likeness to his sister Sunna’s bright solar power, for the moonlight illuminates, yet it also conceals. In Norse mythology, Mani guides the course of the moon and determines its waxing and its waning. Mani is also a chariot-riding deity, and he is followed through the sky by his two children: his son, Hjuki, and his daughter, Bil.

 

 

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week Ellen Dugan

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Deity of the Day for December 4th – Jupiter

Deity of the Day

 Jupiter

The Roman sky god and ruler of their pantheon, sometimes called Jove, Jupiter is a god of justice and was originally a god of (believe it or not) agriculture; in that capacity, he was called Jupiter Lucetius. As the god Jupiter brought the rains that the crops needed to thrive, the older agricultural tie makes sense. As Rome developed over time, Jupiter became more of a dignified and stoic protector and the guardian of the city and state of Rome. In this incarnation he was called Jupiter Optimus Maximus, “the greatest god.” The color associated with this Roman god of the heavens is white. Jupiter had a chariot pulled by four white horses, and his priests all wore white robes. The ram and the eagle were sacred to Jupiter. Foreseeing the future was also associated with Jupiter by ways of divining the signs in the heavens and by reading and studying the flight of birds.

Jupiter is often linked with Zeus in Greek mythology; many of the images of Jupiter are stylized after the Greek Zeus. He was later identified by the German people with their god of thunder, Thor. The Roman Jupiter/Jove was associated with hospitality (probably because he always rode herd on the squabbling gods and goddesses). Jupiter Optimus Maximus, as the protector of Rome, was also in charge of laws and social order on earth. Oaths, treaties, and alliances were sworn in his name, which led to the custom of swearing in his name “By Jupiter!” or “By Jove!”

 

 

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan
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Wednesday’s Deity of the Day – Odin/Wodin

Wednesday’s Deity of the Day

Odin/Wodin

The name Odin tends to be more Norse in origin, while the name Wodin is Anglo-Saxon and Germanic. This hanged god is a god of wisdom and poetry, and his titles are many, including the All-Father. In some Norse mythologies, he is described as wearing a blue or black hooded cloak as he wanders the earth in the winter months, visiting his people. He has two raven companions, Huginn and Muninn, whose names translate to “thought” and “memory.” These ravens circle the earth daily and then return to Odin to whisper to him the news of humankind. In Norse mythology, Odin willingly hung on the world tree, Yggdrasil, for nine days, seeking power. He gained several songs of power and twenty-four runes. Odin carried a spear that never missed its target. Trading one of his eyes for a drink from the well of wisdom, his sacrifice gained him immense knowledge.

Odin is a god of mystery, magick, shamanism, and rune lore. He also eventually became wrapped up in the mythology of Mercury and was called by many names, including Wodan, Wotan, and Ohdinn. Odin is associated with divine intention and the element of air. The horse, raven, wolf, and eagle are all sacred to him. Odin likes to challenge his followers, but he is always there if you need him. Legend says he may only be approached by those who know of him, but in particular by individuals who call his name.

 

 

 

Source:

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan
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Deity of the Day

Hodr

Norse God

 

Hodr, sometimes called Hod, was the twin brother of Baldur, and the Norse god of darkness and winter. He also happened to be blind, and appears a few times in the Norse Skaldic poetry.

Their father, Odin, was concerned about Baldur, who kept suffering from terrible nightmares. So, Odin traveled to Nifhelm, the land of the dead, where he resurrected a wisewoman and asked her for advice. She told him that Hodr would eventually slay Baldur, so Odin went back to Asgard, not happy about these developments.

Odin spoke with Baldur’s mother, Frigga, who decided to have all the creatures on earth swear an oath not to harm Baldur – this way, Hodr could use no weapon against his brother. Unfortunately, Frigga missed her chance to speak with the mistletoe bush. Tricked by Loki, Hodr created an arrow from the mistletoe branch which pierced Baldur’s body, killing him instantly. In some stories, it is not an arrow but a spear instead.

The death of Baldur at Hodr’s hand signified the darkness ruling over the light. As the nights grew longer and colder, the sun faded away each year. There are some clear similarities between this story and many others which detail the changing of the seasons, such as the Greek myth of Demeter and Persephone, and the legend of the Holly King and the Oak King in NeoWiccan beliefs.

Despite being tricked by Loki, Hodr was the one responsible for the death of his brother, and there was a general rule that deaths like Baldur’s must be avenged. Odin tricked a giantess into conceiving a child for him – and this child grew rapidly, reaching adulthood in just one day, to become the god Vali.

Vali journeyed to Midgard and killed Hodr with an arrow, mirroring the death of Baldur. In Norse mythology, Baldur’s death is one of the signals that Ragnarok, the end of the world, is coming.

 

 

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Deity of the Day for November 25th – Amun, Egyptian God

Deity of the Day

 

Amun

Egyptian God

 

Amun is considered as one of the most important and powerful gods of ancient Egypt. He existed as early as the primeval times of the Ogdoad cosmogony and evolved as one of the gods responsible for the creation of the world from the chaos that is Nun. He if often represented as bearded man wearing a cap surmounted by two tall plumes made of red ostrich feathers usually seated on a throne holding the ankh on one hand and the was scepter on the other. His name may also be spelled as Amon, Amoun, Ammon, Amoon, or Amen that translates into the “Hidden One” suggestive of his role as the invisible god of the wind and air. His wife and consort in the Hermopolitan worship is Amaunet.

Aside from his human form, he may also be seen in several other representations. He used to take the form of the goose thus acquiring the epithet “the Great Cackler”. He is sometimes seen as a man with the head of the frog, uraeus or cobra. As a snake, he could regenerate himself by shedding his skin. He is also seen as a man with head of the ram or simply just as ram because at some point he was a god of fertility. He may also be seen as lion crouching by the throne or an ape or even a crocodile. During the Ptolemaic Period, he is depicted as a man with four arms, the body of a beetle, the wings of the hawk, the legs of a human, and the paws of a lion.

Amun is believed to be a self-created god. His first wife was named Wosret but later married Amaunet and Mut. With Mut, he sired a son named Khonsu, the god of the moon. He was originally a deity of local importance in Thebes as a creative force. He rose to prominence when he assimilated another Theban god Montu, the deity of war in the Eleventh dynasty. He became the principal god of the city. During the Middle Kingdom, he rose to national importance when the Theban chief Ahmose I expelled Hyskos from the country. The royal family, in honor of the deity, built several temples to his name – the most prominent of which are the Luxor Temple and the Great Temple in Karnak.

During the New Kingdom, Egypt came close to being a monotheistic state with Amun at the center of attraction. Amun was adopted into the Ennead cosmogony. He and the sun god, Ra, became the hybrid god Amun-Ra. Amun-Ra was thought of as the father and protector of all the pharaohs of Egypt since then. His cult was responsible for the rising role of the women in the society – they wielded great powers and held positions of authority and responsibility. Queen Ahmose Nefertari, for example, was granted the title the “God’s Wife of Amun” – an epithet given to the wife of the pharaoh in acknowledgment of her role and position in the state religion of Amun. The pharaoh Hatshepsut even claimed that her mother was impregnated by Amun in the guise of Pharaoh Thutmoses II

His cult spread further even to neighboring states and countries particularly Nubia. Amun-Ra became the principal deity of Napata during the twenty-fifth dynasty. The people there believed he was Gebel Barkal. By this time, he was considered an equivalent of Zeus by the Greeks.

One of the grandest festivals in ancient Egypt is the Opet Festival. Here, the statue of Amun traverses in the route of the Nile from his temples in Luxor to Karnak in celebration of his marriage to Mut. This festival epitomizes his role in procreation as the “Ka-mut-ef” or the “bull of his mother”.

To date, he and Osiris are one of the most chronicled male deities especially in relics and tablets both of which were referred to as the King of Gods.

 

Source:

Egyptian Gods and Goddesses

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Deity of the Day for November 18th – Priapus, God of Lust and Fertility

Deity of the Day

Priapus

God of Lust and Fertility

 

Priapus was a minor Greek fertility god best known for his large and permanently erect phallus. He was the son of Aphrodite, but there’s some question as to whether his father was Pan, Zeus, Hermes, or one of Aphrodite’s other numerous lovers. Priapus was a protector of gardens and orchards, and is typically portrayed as a homely old man with a raging erection.

According to legend, before his birth, Hera cursed Priapus with impotence as payback for Aphrodite’s involvement in the whole Helen of Troy fiasco. Doomed to spend his life ugly and unloved, Priapus was tossed down to earth when the other gods refused to let him live on Mount Olympus.

He was raised by shepherds, and spent a lot of time hanging out with Pan and the satyrs. However, all this cavorting in the forest with the fertility spirits proved frustrating for Priapus, who remained impotent.

Eventually he tried to rape a nymph, but was thwarted when a braying donkey alerted her to his presence. He pursued the nymph, but the other gods helped her hide by turning her into a lotus plant.

In some stories, his lust left him with a permanent erection, and in others, he was punished by Zeus for the attempted rape by being bestowed a set of huge (but useless) wooden genitalia.

In the Greek countryside, Priapus was honored in homes and gardens, and doesn’t appear to have had an organized cult following. He was seen as a protector deity in rural areas. In fact, statues of Priapus were often adorned with warnings, threatening trespassers, male and female alike, with acts of sexual violence as punishment.

His name gives us the medical term priapism, which is a condition in which a man can’t get rid of his erection, despite a lack of stimulation, within four hours. It is actually considered a medical emergency.

 

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