The Gods

Deity of the Day for October 19th – Taliesin

Deity of the Day

Taliesin

The Tale of Taliesin
Once there was a witch named Ceridwen, and she had two children. The one, her daughter, was as beautiful a child as you could ever hope to see; the other, her son Morfran, was so ugly, ill-favored and stupid that he sickened everyone who saw him.Ceridwen was grieved that Morfran was so horrible, and resolved by her magic arts to make him into such a great bard that no-one would mind his ugliness. She began to cast a great spell. Many were the plants that she cast into her cauldron, many the incantations said over it. An old blind man named Morda was set to keep the fires burning beneath it, assisted by a young boy, Gwion.The Cauldron of Wisdom and Inspiration must be kept boiling for a year and a day, and then the first three drops from it would impart ultimate knowledge to the one who drank them. But the rest of the liquid would be deadly poison.

Long labored Ceridwen, roaming far to find the rare and exotic herbs she required, and so it chanced that she fell asleep on the last day of the spell. The boy Gwion was stirring the brew when three drops flew out onto his thumb, and they were scalding hot, so that he thrust it into his mouth to stop the burning. Instantly, he had the wisdom and inspiration of ages, and the first thing that occurred to him was that Ceridwen would be very angry.

He ran away from the house of Ceridwen, but all too soon he heard the fury of her pursuit. Using his new magical powers, he turned himself into a hare. She turned into a greyhound bitch, and gained ever more on him. He came to a river, and quick as thinking became a fish. She became an otter. He leapt from the water, and in the middle of his leap became a bird of the air. The witch Ceridwen became a hawk. In desperation, he looked down and saw a pile of wheat. He dived, landed, and as it scattered he turned into a single grain. Then she landed and became a hen, and pecked at the grain until she had swallowed Gwion.

Soon after, Ceridwen found herself with child, though she had lain with no man. When she realized that the baby was Gwion, she resolved to kill it, and Morfran wanted her to also, in revenge for his not becoming a bard. In due course, the babe was born, and Morfran would have slaughtered him on the spot, but the mother said no, because it was the most beautiful child ever seen. But she took him and, sewing him in a bag, set him adrift on the ocean.

Now there was at that time in Gwynedd, a lord named Gwyddno Garanhir, who had a son, Elphin, that was reckoned the most unlucky man alive. There was a weir on Gwyddno’s land that had always had a huge catch of salmon in it on May Eve, so Gwyddno resolved to let Elphin have it to help turn his luck.

So it was that on May Eve, Elphin and two of his father’s men went to the weir. Net after net he pulled, but there were no fish.

“Why, you’ve turned the luck of the weir,” they growled.
“Just wait,” said Elphin, “I haven’t finished yet. There might still be something…”
There were no fish. But just as they were about to go, Elphin noticed something caught on a pole of the weir. He waded out and brought it back.
“More bad luck,” grumbled the men.
“There may be a treasure inside,” Elphin replied as he carefully slit open the greased leather bag he held.
To his very great astonishment, he saw the forehead of a baby, so white and beautiful that it seemed to shine.
“A radiant brow!” he exclaimed. (tal iesin in Welsh.)
“Yes, Taliesin, that will do well enough,” said the baby.
Elphin was so surprised he nearly dropped it. The men muttered and made the sign against evil.

He put the child in front of him on the horse and they rode for home. While they rode, Elphin’s thoughts were gloomy, as he realized they still had no salmon. But the babe in front of him spoke, saying

“Fair Elphin, cease your lament!
Swearing profits no-one.
It is not evil to hope
Nor does any man see what supports him,
Not an empty treasure is the prayer of Cynllo,
Nor does God break his promise.
No catch in Gwyddno’s weir
Was ever as good as tonight’s.

“Fair Elphin, dry your cheeks!
Such sorrow does not become you,
Although you consider yourself cheated
Excessive sorrow gains nothing,
Nor will doubting God’s miracles.
Although I am small, I am skilful.
From the sea and the mountain,
From the river’s depth
God gives His gifts to the blessed.

“Elphin of the generous spirit,
Cowardly is your purpose,
You must not grieve so heavily.
Better are good than evil omens.
though I am weak and small,
Spumed with Dylan’s wave,
I shall be better for you
Than three hundred shares of salmon.

“Elphin of noble generosity,
Do not sorrow at your catch.
Though I am weak on the floor of my basket,
There are wonders on my tongue.
“While I am watching over you,
no great need will overcome you.
be mindful of the name of the Trinity
And none shall overcome you.”

“How can this be, that you, a babe, can talk?” marveled Elphin.
Again Taliesin replied with a poem.

“Firstly I was formed in the shape of a handsome man,
in the hall of Ceridwen in order to be refined.
Although small and modest in my behavior,
I was great in her lofty sanctuary.

“While I was held prisoner, sweet inspiration educated me
and laws were imparted to me in a speech which had no words;
but I had to flee from the angry, terrible hag
whose outcry was terrifying.

“Since then I have fled in the shape of a crow,
since then I have fled as a speedy frog,
since then I have fled with rage in my chains,
– a roe-buck in a dense thicket.

“I have fled in the shape of a raven of prophetic speech,
in the shape of a satirizing fox,
in the shape of a sure swift,
in the shape of a squirrel vainly hiding.

“I have fled in the shape of a red deer,
in the shape of iron in a fierce fire,
in the shape of a sword sowing death and disaster,
in the shape of a bull, relentlessly struggling.

“I have fled in the shape of a bristly boar in a ravine,
in the shape of a grain of wheat.
I have been taken by the talons of a bird of prey
which increased until it took the size of a foal.

“Floating like a boat in its waters,
I was thrown into a dark bag,
and on an endless sea, I was set adrift.

“Just as I was suffocating, I had a happy omen,
and the master of the Heavens brought me to liberty.”

By the time he finished, they had arrived at the court of Gwyddno.
Everyone crowded round to see how big the catch was. Elphin held up Taliesin for them all to see.
“What is that? Where is the catch?” asked Gwyddno.
“Here is the catch, father, see, I have caught a bard.”
“Well, what use is that? Don’t you have a good wife, who can bear you many strong sons of your own?”
“He will get more profit from me than the weir ever gave you,” said Taliesin.
“Can you speak, and you so small?” asked Gwyddno.
“Indeed, I am better able to answer than you are to question me.” claimed the baby.
Then Gwyddno asked him what else he had to say, and Taliesin replied with another poem. So Elphin rejoiced, that his luck had turned, and gave Taliesin to his wife to care for. She loved the baby very much, and time passed and he grew up.

The king of the land at that time was Maelgwn, a somewhat vain man who surrounded himself with toadies and fawning sycophants. The year that Taliesin turned thirteen, Elphin received a summons from the king, demanding his presence at the Christ Mass feast at midwinter. Elphin would much rather have stayed home with his wife and foster son, but as a dutiful subject (and a relative of the king besides) he went.

As they all sat around the high table, the other men vied with one another to see who could praise Maelgwn the most. Elphin was an honest man, and he couldn’t honestly say that the king’s bards were better or the queen a fairer woman, than those waiting at his home.
“What, so silent, Elphin? Can our loyal subject then find nothing to praise his king for?” said Maelgwn.
“Well, my lord,” said Elphin, “I would say that though I am not a king, yet my wife is as fair and as virtuous as any woman in the kingdom – and my bard the best in Gwynedd.”
“Insolence!” roared Maelgwn. “Throw him in our deepest dungeon! Let him be chained there until the falsity of his monstrous claim can be shown once and for all! And we think we know just how to do that…”

Taliesin was out skating. As he bent down to take the skates off, he glanced at a patch of ice, and fell into a trance, where he saw all that had befallen Elphin. When he woke, he rushed home to tell Elphin’s wife.

Maelgwn had a son named Rhun, a lecher so revolting that to be seen with him would tarnish a woman’s reputation beyond repair. This son he sent to Elphin’s home, to seduce his wife and show the falsity of his claim. When Rhun came to the gate, he was welcomed, if not warmly, then civilly, by young Taliesin. He showed the prince into the hall, where sat a woman dressed in finery, with rings upon her fingers and a golden torque.

“How delicious!” thought Rhun. “I’ll enjoy this, I can tell.”

She made him welcome and they supped together. Rhun poured cup after cup of wine for her, and foolishly she drank it all. Soon she was giggly and silly, and she assented to his request to withdraw with him to some place more private. Rhun waited until she fell asleep in a drunken stupor, then tried to remove the ring from her plump hand. It would not come off, so quick as lightning he cut the finger off, ring and all.

Laughing, he rode back to his father’s house. Maelgwn was delighted with his son’s performance. He called for Elphin to be brought forth.
“Well, cousin, how say you now? The prince Rhun has had your wife with her willing cooperation. Do you persist in your stupid claim that she is so very fair and virtuous?”
Elphin paled, and feared for his wife, for he did not really believe that any woman, let alone she, would lie with Rhun by choice.
“How do you know this, my king?” he asked.
“My son’s word is good enough for me – and should be for you, too.”
“I’m sorry, my king, but even the money-lenders ask for solid proof where the prince Rhun is concerned.”
The king growled, but the courtiers were, this once, murmuring in agreement with Elphin.
“Since that’s not enough for you, see here is her finger. Do you deny that this is her ring?”
Elphin looked closely at the severed digit.
“Indeed, my lord, it is her ring, but I do deny that it’s on her finger.”
“How so, knave?” roared the enraged monarch.
“For three reasons, my king. First, my wife is a small woman, and this ring sits loosely on her thumb, but it’s jammed so tightly on this finger that it won’t come off. Second, ever since I’ve known her, my wife has trimmed her nails every Sabbath Eve, and this nail hasn’t been trimmed this month, I’d say. Third, we keep servants for kneading bread dough – I certainly don’t require my lady wife to do it. And yet you see under this nail and in the creases of the finger, traces of the rye dough this hand was lately kneading. I fear that the prince has despoiled some innocent kitchen wench, but whoever it was, it wasn’t my wife.”

The court cowered before Maelgwn’s fury.
“You won’t get away from it that easily!” Maelgwn declared. “If your bard is so great, let him come and compete with ours. Now take him away, before we get tired of him.”
Hurriedly, the guards took Elphin back to the cell.

Taliesin was already seeing about provisions for the journey, while Elphin’s wife looked after the poor nine-fingered maidservant. He arrived at the court two days later, and slipped through the gates. He made his way to the throne room and sat in the corner. When the king’s bards filed in, he pouted his lips at them and played blerwm, blerwm on them, and the bards stood still and played blerwm, blerwm on their lips instead of praising Maelgwn. Maelgwn finally ordered a guard to strike Heinnin Fardd, his chief bard. This broke their trance enough that Heinnin Fardd could explain to Maelgwn that there was a devil in the form of a child who had cast a spell on them.

Then Maelgwn had Taliesin brought out, and questioned him.

“I have come to salvage Elphin’s honor and his freedom. Taliesin am I, primary chief bard to Elphin.

“Primary chief poet
Am I to Elphin.
And my native country
Is the place of the Summer Stars.
“John the Divine
Called me Merlin,
But all future kings
Shall call me Taliesin.

“I was nine full months
In the womb of Ceridwen.
Before that I was Gwion,
But now I am Taliesin.

“I was with my king
In the heavens
When Lucifer fell
Into the deepest hell.

“I carried the banner
Before Alexander.
I know the names of the stars
From the North to the South.

“I was in Caer Bedion
Tetragrammaton.
I accompanied Heon
To the vale of Hebron.

“I was in the canon
When Absalom was slain.
I was in Llys Don
Before the birth of Gwydion.

“I was patriarch
To Elijah and Enoch.
I was there at the crucifixion
Of the merciful Mabon.

“I was the foreman
At the construction of Nimrod’s Tower.
I was three times
In the prison of Arianrhod.

“I was in the ark
With Noah and Alpha
I witnessed the destruction
Of Sodom and Gomorrah.

“I was in Africa
Before the building of Rome.
I came here
To the remnant of Troy

“I was with the Lord
In the manger of the ass.
I upheld Moses
Through the water of Jordan.

“I was at the Cross
With Mary Magdalene.
I received the muse
From Ceridwen’s cauldron.

“I was a harping bard
To Deon of Lochlin.
I have gone hungry
For the Righteous One.

“I was at the White Mount
in the court of Cynfelyn.
In stocks and in fetters
For a year and a day.

“I was in the larder
In the land of the Trinity.
And no-one knows whether my body
Is flesh or fish.

“I was instructor
To the whole universe.
I shall be until the judgement
On the face of the Earth.

“I have sat in the perilous seat
Above Caer Sidi.
I shall continue to revolve
Between the three elements.

“There is a marvel in the world
Which I cannot reveal.”
“And all this makes you think you’re better than my bards,” sneered Maelgwn, “My bards, who have trained for twenty years.”
“They are as nothing beside me,” declared Taliesin.
“Well then, my lord,” said Heinnin Fardd, so as not to be left entirely out of the proceedings, “certainly a contest will decide the matter.”
“Why not? Me against all the king’s bards. The contest – to compose a poem on the wind.” Taliesin was serenely confident.
“Of course the king must judge,” fawned Heinnin Fardd. “Who better?”
“And this contest will take place in twenty minutes,” Maelgwn announced. (He was getting bored.)
“Twenty… my lord, I entreat you, I implore you, how can an epic be composed in -” Heinnin Fardd was desperate.
“Just do it, get on with it, I’m getting sick of this.”

Heinnin Fardd and the king’s bards huddled in the corner, consulting scrolls of rhymes and metaphors. Every so often, one let out a yelp of frustration. Taliesin lounged on the floor, laughing at their discomfiture.

When the time was up, the king’s bards stood in a line before the throne and bowed.
“O greatest of kings, hear our song.

Blerwm, blerwm,
blerwm, blerwm,
blerwm, blerwm,
blerwm, blerwm.”

“Knaves! Fools! Miserable swine! Was it for this that I paid you in gold and precious gems?” The court had never seen Maelgwn so angry. The bards groveled in the rushes. “Mighty king, it was not our fault! It’s that demon child.”

Taliesin, admittedly, was smirking in a most irritating fashion.
“So it’s my turn?” he asked. He stood up straight and began. While he sang, a great wind arose and buffeted the castle, shaking it to its foundations. Maelgwn was afraid, and he called for Elphin to be brought out.

As soon as Elphin was brought out, Taliesin stopped the wind, and sang a new song that caused Elphin’s chains to fall away from his ankles and wrists. Then he cried out to Elphin’s wife to enter the hall, and she held her hands up so that everyone could see that she had ten fingers. Maelgwn was angrier than ever.

“You think you’re so great. You’re nothing! I bet my horses are better than yours, anyway.”
Taliesin smiled and whispered to Elphin, “Take him up on it – I know how to make us win.”
“I accept, my king.”
“Then let there be a horse race.”

Elphin led the other two home. On the appointed day, they returned, leading a lame old horse. Maelgwn rubbed his hands in glee.

The horses started – Taliesin riding old Dobbin. As each horse of the king’s overtook him, he struck it on the rump with a holly twig, then let it fall. As the king’s horses got further and further ahead, no-one could understand why Taliesin was still smiling. He slowed down and dropped his cap – again, no-one knew why.

Old Dobbin reached half-way, and Taliesin stopped him for a rest. The king’s horses had long since passed them on the way back. Dobbin started back. As the king’s horses passed the discarded holly twigs that Taliesin had struck them with, they stopped, reared up on their hind legs, and began to dance. The whole court was in fits of ill-concealed laughter, except Maelgwn and Rhun.

Taliesin and Dobbin wandered past them to the finish line. Maelgwn saw no alternative to letting them go. On the way home, Taliesin bid Elphin stop where he had dropped his cap. He had some men dig a hole at the spot, and they dug up a great chest full of treasure.

“Truly, Taliesin, never could I regret the day I pulled you out from the weir,” said Elphin as they rode away.

FINIS

(It is said that afterwards, Taliesin went to the court of Arthur, where he was chief harper and adviser to the king.)

Taliesin is also the name of a town in the U.S.A., named after the bard by Frank Lloyd Wright.

 

by Jennifer Cochrane

Website: Encyclopedia Mythica

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The Charge of the God


Days of the Week Comments=

The Charge of the God

 

Listen to the words of the Horned God,
 
 
The Guardian of all things wild and free, and Keeper of the Gates of Death, whose Call all must answer:
 
 
I am the fire within your heart… The yearning of your Soul. I am the Hunter of Knowledge and the Seeker of the Holy Quest; I who stand in the darkness of light; I am He whom you have called Death. I am the Consort and Mate of Her we adore, call forth to me.
 
 
Heed my call beloved ones, come unto me and learn the secrets of death and peace. I am the corn at harvest and the fruit on the trees. I am He who leads you home. Scourge and Flame, Blade and Blood these are mine and gifts to thee.
 
 
Call unto me in the forest wild and on hilltop bare and seek me in the Darkness Bright. I who have been called; Pan, Herne, Osiris , and Hades, speak to thee in thy search. Come dance and sing; come live and smile, for behold: this is my worship.
 
 
You are my children and I am thy Father. On swift night wings it is I who lay you at the Mother’s feet to be reborn and to return again. 
 
 
Thou who thinks to seek me, know that I am the untamed wind, the fury of storm and passion in your Soul. Seek me with pride and humility, but seek me best with love and strength.
 
 
For this is my path, and I love not the weak and fearful. Hear my call on long Winter nights and we shall stand together guarding Her Earth as She sleeps. 
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Deity of the Day for Sept. 21 – Dionysus, God of the Vine

Deity of the Day

 Dionysus

Dionysus is the God of the Vine.
Dionysus’ name means “twice born” or “child of the double door.”
Many city-states outlawed the wild, orgiastic rites of Dionysus.
Dionysus’ Roman name is Bacchus.

He was the god of fertility and wine, later considered a patron of the arts. He invented wine and spread the art of tending grapes. He has a dual nature. On the one hand bringing joy and divine ecstasy. On the other brutal, unthinking, rage. Thus, reflecting both sides of wines nature. If he choses Dionysus can drive a man mad. No normal fetters can hold him or his followers.

Dionysus is the son of Zeus and Semele. He is the only god to have a mortal parent. Zeus came to Semele in the night, invisible, felt only as a divine presence. Semele was pleased to be a lover of a god, even though she did not know which one. Word soon got around and Hera quickly assumed who was responsible. Hera went to Semele in disguise and convinced her she should see her lover as he really was. When Zeus next came to her she made him promise to grant her one wish. She went so far as to make him swear on the River Styx that he would grant her request. Zeus was madly in love and agreed. She then asked him to show her his true form. Zeus, was unhappy, and knew what would happen but, having sworn he had no choice. He appeared in his true form and Semele was instantly burnt to a crisp by the sight of his glory. Zeus did manage to rescue Dionysus and stitched him into his thigh to hold him until he was ready to be born. His birth from Zeus alone conferred immortality upon him.

Dionysus problems with Hera were not yet over. She was still jealous and arranged for the Titans to kill him. The Titans ripped him into to pieces. However, Rhea brought him back to life. After this Zeus arranged for his protection and turned him over the mountain nymphs to be raised.

Dionysus wandered the world actively encouraging his cult. He was accompanied by the Maenads, wild women, flush with wine, shoulders draped with a fawn skin, carrying rods tipped with pine cones. While other gods had templaces the followers of Dionysus worshipped him in the woods. Here they might go into mad states where they would rip apart and eat raw any animal they came upon.

Dionysus is also one of the very few that was able to bring a dead person out of the underworld. Even though he had never seen Semele he was concerned for her. Eventually he journeyed into the underworld to find her. He faced down Thanatos and brought her back to Mount Olympus.

Dionysus became one of the most important gods in everyday life. He became associated with several key concepts. One was rebirth after death. Here his dismemberment by the Titans and return to life is symbolically echoed in tending vines, where the vines must be pruned back sharply, and then become dormant in winter for them to bear fruit. The other is the idea that under the influence of wine, one could feel possessed by a greater power. Unlike the other gods Dionysus was not only outside his believers but, also within them. At these times a man might be greater than himself and do works he otherwise could not.

The festival for Dionysus is in the spring when the leaves begin to reappear on the vine. It became one of the most important events of the year. It’s focus became the theater. Most of the great greek plays were initially written to be performed at the feast of Dionysus. All who took part writers, actors, spectators were regarded as sacred servants of Dionysus during the festival.

 

Source:
Greek Mythology.com

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The Horned One; The Harvest King


Autumn Comments & Graphics


THE HORNED ONE; THE HARVEST KING

The God speaks:

I am the radiant King of the Heavens, flooding the Earth with warmth and encouraging the hidden seed of creation to burst forth into manifestation. I lift My shining spear to light the lives of all beings and daily pour forth My gold upon the Earth, putting to flight the powers of darkness.

I am the master of the beasts wild and free. I run with the swift stag and soar as a sacred falcon against the simmering sky. The ancient woods and wild places emanate My powers and the birds of the air sing of My sanctity.

I am also the last harvest, offering up My grain and fruit beneath the sickle of time so that all may be nourished. For without planting there can be no harvest; without winter no spring.

Worship Me as the thousand-named Sun of creation, the spirit of the horned stag in the wild, the endless harvest. See in the yearly cycle of festivals My birth, death and rebirth – and know that such is the destiny of all creation.

I am the spark of life, the radiant Sun, the giver of peace and rest, and I send My rays of blessing to warm the hearts and strengthen the minds of all.

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Deity of the Day for September 19th is Horus

Deity of the Day

 Horus

The falcon-headed Sky God

Horus is the god of the sky, and the son of Osiris, the creator (whose own birth was thought due to the Ogdoad). Horus became depicted as a falcon, or as a falcon-headed man, leading to Horus’ name, (in Egyptian, Heru), which meant The distant one.

Horus was sometimes known as Nekheny (meaning falcon), although it has been proposed that Nekheny may have been another falcon-god, worshipped at Nekhen (city of the hawk), that became identified as Horus very early on. In this form, he was sometimes given the title Kemwer, meaning (the) great black (one), referring to the bird’s color.

Horus Identities

- Mekhenti-irry (He who has on his brow Two Eyes) – the sun and moon representing his eyes, on nights when there is no moon. In this form he was considered the god of the blind.

- Haroeris (Horus the Elder) An early form of Horus – God of light. His eyes represented the sun and moon. He was the brother of Osiris and Seth. Sometimes he was the son, or the husband of Hathor.

- Horus Behudety In the form of Horus of Edfu, he represented the midday sun. This Horus was worshipped in the western Delta and later, as his cult spread south into Upper Egypt, a cult center was established in Edfu. Horus of Edfu fights a great battle against Seth and an army of conspirators. He is pictured as a winged sun-disk or as a hawk headed lion.

- Ra-Harakhte (Horus of the two horizons) – He was identified with Ra and the daily voyage of the sun from horizon to horizon. The two deities combined to become Ra-Harakhte. He was represented as a falcon or a falcon-headed man wearing the solar disk and double crown or the uraeus and the atef crown.

- Harmakhet (Horus in the Horizon) In this form he represented the rising sun and was associated with Khepri. He was also considered to be the keeper of wisdom. He was sometimes pictured as a man with a falcon’s head, or a falcon headed lion. But his most recognizable form is that of a sphinx, or as a ram-headed sphinx.

- Harsiesis (Horus son of Isis) This Horus was the son of Isis and Osiris. He was conceived magically after the death of Osiris and brought up by Isis on a floating island in the marshes of Buto. The child was weak and in constant danger from the scheming of his wicked uncle Seth, who sent serpents andmonsters to attack him. But his mother, Isis was great in themagical arts and she warded off this evil by using a spellagainst creatures biting with their mouths and stinging withtheir tails, and the young Horus survived and grew.

- Harendotes (Horus the avenger of his father)

- Har-pa-Neb-Taui (Horus Lord of the Two Lands)

- Harpokrates (The infant Horus) As a child he represented the new born sun and was often pictured being suckled by Isis. he was usually represented as a seated child, sucking his thumb, his head was shaved except for the sidelock of youth. Even as a child, he wore the royal crown and uraeus

As Horus was the son of Osiris, and god of the sky, he became closely associated with the Pharaoh of Upper Egypt (where Horus was worshipped), and became their patron. The association with the Pharaoh brought with it the idea that he was the son of Isis, in her original form, who was regarded as a deification of the Queen.

It was said that after the world was created, Horus landed on a perch, known as the djeba, which literally translates as finger, in order to rest, which consequently became considered sacred. On some occasions, Horus was referred to as lord of the djeba (i.e. lord of the perch or lord of the finger), a form in which he was especially worshipped at Buto, known as Djebauti, meaning (ones) of the djeba (the reason for the plural is not understood, and may just have been a result of Epenthesis, or Paragoge). The form of Djebauti eventually became depicted as an heron, nevertheless continuing to rest on the sacred perch.

Just as a precaution: a great deal of the following information is incorrect. For example, Isis has always been Horus’ mother and never his wife. Osiris has always been Horus’ father and Horus is not both Horus and Osiris. The relation between the story of Jesus and the story of Horus is the fact that Horus’ story is the story of the REAL first immaculate conception.

The story goes as follows: Seth (brother of Osiris) was jealous of Osiris and fought him to the death. After he killed Osiris he cut his body up into 14 pieces and spread the pieces throughout Egypt. Isis (Osiris’ wife) found out that her husband was killed and she searched egypt looking for his body parts. She found all but one (his penis) and using her magic she put his body together and buried him, during the process of putting him back together she became impregnated with her son Horus. She gave birth to Horus who became the god of the sky and later avenged his fathers death by killing his uncle Seth.

Horus as Sun God

Since Horus was said to be the sky, it was natural that he was rapidly considered to also contain the sun and moon. It became said that the sun was one of his eyes and the moon the other, and that they traversed the sky when he, a falcon, flew across it. Thus he became known as Harmerty – Horus of two eyes.

Later, the reason that the moon was not as bright as the sun was explained by a tale, known as the contestings of Horus and Set, originating as a metaphor for the conquest of Lower Egypt by Upper Egypt in about 3000BC. In this tale, it was said that Set, the patron of Lower Egypt, and Horus, the patron of Upper Egypt, had battled for Egypt brutally, with neither side victorious, until eventually the gods sided with Horus.

As Horus was the ultimate victor he became known as Harsiesis (Heru-ur, and Har-Wer, in Egyptian), meaning Horus the Great, but more usually translated as Horus the Elder. Meanwhile, in the struggle, Set had lost a testicle, explaining why the desert, which Set represented is infertile.

Horus’ right eye had also been gouged out, which explained why the moon, which it represented, was so weak compared to the sun. It was also said that during a new-moon, Horus had become blinded and was titled Mekhenty-er-irty (he who has no eyes), while when the moon became visible again, he was re-titled Khenty-irty (he who has eyes).

While blind, it was considered that Horus was quite dangerous, sometimes attacking his friends after mistaking them for enemies.

Ultimately, as another sun god, Horus became identified with Ra as Ra-Herakhty, literally Ra, who is Horus of the two horizons. However, this identification proved to be awkward, for it made Ra the son of Hathor, and therefore a created being rather than the creator.

And, even worse, it made Ra into Horus, who was the son of Ra, i.e. it made Ra his own son and father, in a standard sexually-reproductive manner, an idea that would not be considered comprehensible until the hellenic era. Consequently Ra and Horus never completely merged into a single falcon-headed sun god.

Nevertheless the idea of making the identification persisted, and Ra continued to be depicted as falcon-headed. Likewise, as Ra-Herakhty, in an allusion to the Ogdoad creation myth, Horus was occasionally shown in art as a naked boy, with a finger in his mouth, sitting on a lotus with his mother.

In the form of a youth, Horus was referred to as Neferhor (also spelt Nefer Hor, Nephoros, and Nopheros), which, in the Egyptian language, means beautiful Horus (i.e. youthful Horus).In an attempt to resolve the conflict, Ra-Herakhty was occasionally said to be married to Iusaaset, which was technically his own shadow, having previously been Atum’s shadow, before Atum was identified as Ra, in the form Atum-Ra, and thus of Ra-Herakhty when Ra was also identified as a form of Horus.

In the version of the Ogdoad creation myth used by the Thoth cult, Thoth created Ra-Herakhty, via an egg, and so was said to be the father of Neferhor.

Mystery Religion

Since Horus, as the son of Osiris, was only in existence after Osiris’s death, and because Horus, in his earlier guise, was the husband of Isis, the difference between Horus and Osiris blurred, and so, after a few centuries, it came to be said that Horus was the resurrected form of Osiris. Likewise, as the form of Horus before his death and resurrection, Osiris, who had already become considered a form of creator when belief about Osiris assimilated that about Ptah-Seker, also became considered to be the only creator, since Horus had gained these aspects of Ra.

Eventually, in the Hellenic period, Horus was, in some locations, identified completely as Osiris, and became his own father, since this concept was not so disturbing to Greek philosophy as it had been to that of ancient Egypt.

In this form, Horus was sometimes known as Heru-sema-tawy, meaning Horus, uniter of two lands, since Horus ruled over the land of the dead, and that of the living. Since the tale became one of Horus’ own death and rebirth, which happened partly due to his own actions, he became a life-death-rebirth deity.

In the time of Christ the term “son of god” had come to mean the bearer of this title was the father god himself as well as his own son incarnated on earth. Horus was Osiris the father who incarnated as Horus the son.By assimilating Hathor, who had herself assimilated Bata, who was associated with music, and in particular the sistrum, Isis was likewise thought of in some areas in the same manner.

This particularly happened amongst the groups who thought of Horus as his own father, and so Horus, in the form of the son, amongst these groups often became known as Ihy (alternately: Ihi, Ehi, Ahi, Ihu), meaning sistrum player, which allowed the confusion between the father and son to be side-stepped.

The combination of this, now rather esoteric mythology, with the philosophy of Plato, which was becoming popular on the mediterranean shores, lead to the tale becoming the basis of a mystery religion.

Many Greeks, and those of other nations, who encountered the faith, thought it so profound that they sought to create their own, modelled upon it, but using their own gods. This lead to the creation of what was effectively one religion, which was, in many places, adjusted to superficially reflect the local mythology although it substantially adjusted them.

The religion is known to modern scholars as that of Osiris-Dionysus.

 

Source:
Crystalinks

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Deity of the Day for September 18th is Dionysus

Deity of the Day

Dionysus

 

He was the god of fertility and wine, later considered a patron of the arts. He invented wine and spread the art of tending grapes. He has a dual nature. On the one hand bringing joy and divine ecstasy. On the other brutal, unthinking, rage. Thus, reflecting both sides of wines nature. If he choses Dionysus can drive a man mad. No normal fetters can hold him or his followers.

Dionysus is the son of Zeus and Semele. He is the only god to have a mortal parent. Zeus came to Semele in the night, invisible, felt only as a divine presence. Semele was pleased to be a lover of a god, even though she did not know which one. Word soon got around and Hera quickly assumed who was responsible. Hera went to Semele in disguise and convinced her she should see her lover as he really was. When Zeus next came to her she made him promise to grant her one wish. She went so far as to make him swear on the River Styx that he would grant her request. Zeus was madly in love and agreed. She then asked him to show her his true form. Zeus, was unhappy, and knew what would happen but, having sworn he had no choice. He appeared in his true form and Semele was instantly burnt to a crisp by the sight of his glory. Zeus did manage to rescue Dionysus and stitched him into his thigh to hold him until he was ready to be born. His birth from Zeus alone conferred immortality upon him.

Dionysus problems with Hera were not yet over. She was still jealous and arranged for the Titans to kill him. The Titans ripped him into to pieces. However, Rhea brought him back to life. After this Zeus arranged for his protection and turned him over the mountain nymphs to be raised.

Dionysus wandered the world actively encouraging his cult. He was accompanied by the Maenads, wild women, flush with wine, shoulders draped with a fawn skin, carrying rods tipped with pine cones. While other gods had templaces the followers of Dionysus worshipped him in the woods. Here they might go into mad states where they would rip apart and eat raw any animal they came upon.

Dionysus is also one of the very few that was able to bring a dead person out of the underworld. Even though he had never seen Semele he was concerned for her. Eventually he journeyed into the underworld to find her. He faced down Thanatos and brought her back to Mount Olympus.

Dionysus became one of the most important gods in everyday life. He became associated with several key concepts. One was rebirth after death. Here his dismemberment by the Titans and return to life is symbolically echoed in tending vines, where the vines must be pruned back sharply, and then become dormant in winter for them to bear fruit. The other is the idea that under the influence of wine, one could feel possessed by a greater power. Unlike the other gods Dionysus was not only outside his believers but, also within them. At these times a man might be greater than himself and do works he otherwise could not.

The festival for Dionysus is in the spring when the leaves begin to reappear on the vine. It became one of the most important events of the year. It’s focus became the theater. Most of the great greek plays were initially written to be performed at the feast of Dionysus. All who took part writers, actors, spectators were regarded as sacred servants of Dionysus during the festival.

 

Source:
Greek Mythology.com

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Deity of the Day for August 18th is Osiris, Egyptian God of the Underworld

Deity of the Day

 Osiris

Egyptian God of the Underworld

 

Here are the facts about Osiris, the Ancient Egyptian God.

  • Osiris is associated with the dead. He is often called the god of the afterlife and the ruler of the underworld.
  • He was the son of the Ged (the Earth God) and Nut (the Sky Goddess). His sister and wife was the goddess Isis.
  • In many of the Ancient Egyptian myths, Isis and Osiris are the parents of Horus.
  • According to one of the myths, Set killed Osiris by tricking him into getting into a box. Set sealed the box and threw it into the River Nile. Isis, the wife of Osiris, found Osiris’ body and used her magic to bring it back to life. Isis became pregnant with Horus and Osiris died once more. Isis buried Osiris in the desert. Set discovered the body of Osiris and was so angry that he tore the body into several pieces, scattering them throughout Egypt. Isis painstakingly collected all of the body parts and reassembled them for burial. The gods were impressed by the actions of Isis and brought Osiris back to rule the underworld as the Lord of the Dead.
  • Osiris is usually depicted with as a man with green skin (to represent rebirth and regrowth). His legs are wrapped like an Egyptian mummy and he has a long beard (as worn by the Ancient Egyptian pharaohs). He often wears a crown decorated with ostrich feathers and he holds a crook in one hand and a flail in the other.

 

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Author: James
Website: Primary Facts
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Deity of the Day for August 7th is Apollo, Greek God of the Sun

Deity of the Day

 

 Apollo

Greek God of the Sun

 

Here’s a quick guide to the basic facts about Apollo.

Apollo’s Appearance: A young man with curly golden hair or, sometimes, rays of the sun emanating from his head..

Symbol or Attribute of Apollo: The Sun itself, the lyre (a type of musical instrument), the bow, and the chariot he drives across the sky daily, borrowed from an earlier pre-Greek Sun god, Helios.

Apollo’s Strengths: Creative, handsome, supportive of all the arts of civilization.

Apollo’s Weaknesses: Like his father Zeus, Apollo is all too happy to enjoy the charms of nymphs, as well as the occasional youth, and his conquests number in the dozens.

Birthplace of Apollo: On the sunny Greek island of Delos, where he was born along with his twin sister, Artemis. A palm tree is pointed out as the actual site of the birth. Another tradition gives the islands of Lato, the Letoides, now called Paximadia, off the southern coast of Crete.

Spouse: Apollo had many encounters, but no formal marriages. Flings with Cassandra, to whom he gave the gift of prophecy; Daphne, who fled from his embrace and turned into a laurel tree; Acacallis, a maiden from the Samaria Gorge on the island of Crete who was spurned by her proud family for choosing a “foreign” Greek god, and Calliope, with whom he had a child, Orpheus.

Apollo’s Children: Information varies, but the enchanting semi-divine singer Orpheus and Asklepios, also spelled Asclepius, Aesculapius and other variants, the god of healing, are the most famous of Apollo’s offspring.

Some Major Temple Sites of Apollo: The mountain town of Delphi, where a few columns from an early temple of Apollo still stand. The island of Delos is also sacred to him, but there is no temple remaining there today.

Apollo in some places replaced an earlier solar god, Helios. High mountain tops were sacred to Helios, and today, churches dedicated to Saint Elias are often found on these same spots.

Basic Story: Apollo was the son of the supreme Greek god Zeus and Leto, a nymph. Zeus’s wife Hera was outraged and convinced the earth to refuse to allow Leto to give birth anywhere on its surface. But the island of Delos allowed Leto to take refuge there and give birth to Apollo and his twin sister, Artemis, goddess of the hunt and wild things. The goddess Themis assisted in raising him by feeding him ambrosia, the sacred nectar of the gods.

Interesting Fact: Apollo Delphinus or Delphinius was the dolphin-form of the god and was revered at Delphi – despite its location high in the mountains. He supposedly commandeered a Cretan ship in his dolphin form, jumping out of the water and landing on its deck, and then forced it to the coastline at Delphi; the sailors on the ship supposedly became his first priests at Delphi. He was also believed to have destroyed an evil serpent at Delphi, and took over as the patron god of the famous oracle there. Some ancient coins show the head of Apollo with dolphins swimming in the background.

Some images of Apollo in profile on coins are very beautiful and often can be mistaken for an image of a goddess instead. The inscription may read Ἀπόλλων (Apollon) or Ἀπέλλων, among other variants. If you see the first two letters, it’s almost certainly Apollo.

 

 

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Fast Facts on Apollo
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