The Goddesses

Deity of the Day for Aug. 20th – Idunn The Norse Goddess

Deity of the Day


The Norse Goddess


Areas of Influence: Idunn is the Norse Goddess of youth and springtime.

Her name means she who renews and has several alternative spellings including: Indun, Iduna and Idhunna.

She was one of the lesser known Aesir Goddesses who lived in Asgard.

She is the keeper of the magical apples that give the Gods immortality.

When Loki arranges for the giant Thiassi to abduct her all the Gods and Goddesses start to age and weaken.

Loki is summoned by the angry Gods and is told to rescue her. He borrows Freya’s falcon cloak and flies to the giants house. Luckily the Giant is out fishing so Loki transforms Idun into a nut, attempting to fly her home quickly before the giant discovers her missing.

The Giant returns home early and changes into an eagleso he can give chase. The Eagle is faster than a falcon and the giant begins to gain on Loki. Odin sees them in the distance and instructs the Gods to light a fire once Loki has safely flown overhead. The Eagle is unable to stop and his wings burst into flames.

Origins and Genealogy: She is married to Bragi the God of poetry. I have not included her parentage as the information is incomplete and contradictory.

Strengths: Generous and youthful.

Weaknesses: Naivety, too trusting.

Symbolism: Shown as a beautiful maiden.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples which she carries in a basket.

Idunn’s Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden Archetype represents purity and the innocence of childhood, where the soul’s dreams, magic and make believe still prevail.

It is also an aspect of the Triple Goddess, together with the Mother and the Crone they represents the cycles of the moon and the different stages of a woman’s life.

Shadow Maiden is very self centered all, her dreams and energy is expended on achieving her own personal needs and goals.

Idunn is a Maiden Goddess as she is the Goddess of youth and the springtime.

How To Work With This Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden is one of your Archetypes if you are life still in touch with your childhood intuition and fantasies and have used these to fulfill your dreams. Hence you can still have the Maiden Archetype at any time of life.

The Maiden reminds you to look after the magical child that lies within us all.

Shadow Maiden asks you to look at whether your dreams and aspirations are selfish and take no account of the needs of others.



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The Goddess Creed

Celtic & British Isles Graphics

The Goddess Creed

I believe in Goddess the Mother All Mighty

Creatrix of the heavens and earth

And in all women

Who were conceived of Her love

Born of our sacred mothers

Suffered under patriarchy

Were crucified, died, and were buried

We descended into the underworld

The third day we arose again

We integrated with our new selves

And we now sit with Goddess our Mother

And we judge no one

I believe in the Holy Mother

The maiden, mother, crone

Forgiveness toward others

The celebration of the body

And everlasting renewal of life

So Mote It Be

(c) 2008 Danu Gray Wolf

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Deity of the Day for July 30th is Nephthys

Deity of the Day


Goddess of Death, Service, Lamentation and Nighttime

Nephthys ((/ˈnɛpθɨs/ or /ˈnɛfθɨs/) or Nebthet/ˈnɛbˌθɛt/ (Arabic: نيفتيس Nyftys) is a member of the Great Ennead of Heliopolis in Egyptian mythology, a daughter of Nut and Geb. Nephthys was typically paired with her sister Isis in funerary rites because of their role as protectors of the mummy and the god Osiris and as the sister-wife of Set.

Nephthys is the Greek form of an epithet (transliterated as Nebet-het, and Nebt-het, from Egyptian hieroglyphs).The origin of the goddess Nephthys is unclear but the literal translation of her name is usually given as “Lady of the House,” which has caused some to mistakenly identify her with the notion of a “housewife,” or as the primary lady who ruled a domestic household. This is a pervasive error repeated in many commentaries concerning this deity. Her name means quite specifically, “Lady of the [Temple] Enclosure” which associates her with the role of priestess.

This title, which may be more of an epithet describing her function than a given name, probably indicates the association of Nephthys with one particular temple or some specific aspect of the Egyptian temple ritual. Along with her sister Isis, Nephthys represented the temple pylon or trapezoidal tower gateway entrance to the temple which also displayed the flagstaff. This entrance way symbolised the horizon or akhet.

At the time of the Fifth Dynasty Pyramid Texts, Nephthys appears as a goddess of the Heliopolitan Ennead. She is the sister of Isis and companion of the war-like deity, Set. As sister of Isis and especially Osiris, Nephthys is a protective goddess who symbolizes the death experience, just as Isis represented the (re-)birth experience.

Nephthys was known in some ancient Egyptian temple theologies and cosmologies as the “Useful Goddess” or the “Excellent Goddess”. These late Ancient Egyptian temple texts describe a goddess who represented divine assistance and protective guardianship.

Nephthys is regarded as the mother of the funerary-deity Anubis (Inpu) in some myths. Alternatively Anubis appears as the son of Bastet or Isis.

As the primary “nursing mother” of the incarnate Pharaonic-god, Horus, Nephthys also was considered to be the nurse of the reigning Pharaoh himself. Though other goddesses could assume this role, Nephthys was most usually portrayed in this function. In contrast Nephthys is sometimes featured as a rather ferocious and dangerous divinity, capable of incinerating the enemies of the Pharaoh with her fiery breath.

New Kingdom Ramesside Pharaohs, in particular, were enamored of Mother Nephthys, as is attested in various stelae and a wealth of inscriptions at Karnak and Luxor, where Nephthys was a member of that great city’s Ennead and her altars were present in the massive complex.

Nephthys was typically paired with her sister Isis in funerary rites because of their role as protectors of the mummy and the god Osiris and as the sister-wife of Seth.

Less well understood than her sister Isis, Nephthys was no less important in Egyptian Religion as confirmed by the work of E. Hornung, along with the work of several noted scholars.

“Ascend and descend; descend with Nephthys, sink into darkness with the Night-bark. Ascend and descend; ascend with Isis, rise with the Day-bark.”

Pyramid Text Utterance 222 line 210.

In the funerary role, Nephthys often was depicted as a kite, or as a woman with falcon wings, usually outstretched as a symbol of protection. Nephthys’s association with the kite or the Egyptian hawk (and its piercing, mournful cries) evidently reminded the ancients of the lamentations usually offered for the dead by wailing women. In this capacity, it is easy to see how Nephthys could be associated with death and putrefaction in the Pyramid Texts. She was, almost without fail, depicted as crowned by the hieroglyphics signifying her name, which were a combination of signs for the sacred temple enclosure (hwt), along with the sign for neb, or mistress (Lady), on top of the enclosure sign

Nephthys was clearly viewed as a morbid-but-crucial force of heavenly transition, i.e., the Pharaoh becomes strong for his journey to the afterlife through the intervention of Isis and Nephthys. The same divine power could be applied later to all of the dead, who were advised to consider Nephthys a necessary companion. According to the Pyramid Texts, Nephthys, along with Isis, was a force before whom demons trembled in fear, and whose magical spells were necessary for navigating the various levels of Duat, as the region of the afterlife was termed.

It should here be noted that Nephthys was not necessarily viewed as the polar opposite of Isis, but rather as a different reflection of the same reality: eternal life in transition. Thus, Nephthys was also seen in the Pyramid Texts as a supportive cosmic force occupying the night-bark on the journey of Ra, the majestic sun god, particularly when he entered Duat at the transitional time of dusk, or twilight. Isis was Ra’s companion at the coming of dawn.

Nephthys plays an important role in the Osirian myth-cycle.

It is Nephthys who assists Isis in gathering and mourning the dismembered portions of the body of Osiris, after his murder by the envious Set. Nephthys also serves as the nursemaid and watchful guardian of the infant Horus. The Pyramid Texts refer to Isis as the “birth-mother” and to Nephthys as the “nursing-mother” of Horus. Nephthys was attested as one of the four “Great Chiefs” ruling in the Osirian cult-center of Busiris, in the Delta and she appears to have occupied an honorary position at the holy city of Abydos. No cult is attested for her there, though she certainly figured as a goddess of great importance in the annual rites conducted, wherein two chosen females or priestesses played the roles of Isis and Nephthys and performed the elaborate ‘Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys’. There, at Abydos, Nephthys joined Isis as a mourner in the shrine known as the Osireion. These “Festival Songs of Isis and Nephthys” were ritual elements of many such Osirian rites in major ancient Egyptian cult-centers.

As a mortuary goddess (along with Isis, Neith, and Serqet), Nephthys was one of the protectresses of the Canopic jars of the Hapi. Hapi, one of the Sons of Horus, guarded the embalmed lungs. Thus we find Nephthys endowed with the epithet, “Nephthys of the Bed of Life,” in direct reference to her regenerative priorities on the embalming table. In the city of Memphis, Nephthys was duly honored with the title “Queen of the Embalmer’s Shop,” and there associated with the jackal-headed god Anubis as patron.

Nephthys was also considered a festive deity whose rites could mandate the liberal consumption of beer. In various reliefs at Edfu, Dendera, and Behbeit, Nephthys is depicted receiving lavish beer-offerings from the Pharaoh, which she would “return”, using her power as a beer-goddess “that [the pharaoh] may have joy with no hangover.” Elsewhere at Edfu, for example, Nephthys is a goddess who gives the Pharaoh power to see “that which is hidden by moonlight.” This fits well with more general textual themes that consider Nephthys to be a goddess whose unique domain was darkness, or the perilous edges of the desert.

Nephthys could also appear as one of the goddesses who assists at childbirth. One ancient Egyptian myth preserved in the Papyrus Westcar recounts the story of Isis, Nephthys, Meskhenet, and Heqet as traveling dancers in disguise, assisting the wife of a priest of Amun-Re as she prepares to bring forth sons who are destined for fame and fortune.

Nephthys’s healing skills and status as direct counterpart of Isis, steeped, as her sister in “words of power,” are evidenced by the abundance of faience amulets carved in her likeness, and by her presence in a variety of magical papyri that sought to summon her famously altruistic qualities to the aid of mortals.



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Deity of the Day for July 28th is Blodeuwedd

Deity of the Day



Blodeuwedd (pronounced Blow-day-yoo-eth) is the Welsh Goddess of Flowers.

After Lleu’s mother, Arianrhod declared that he would never have a mortal wife, his two magician companions, Gwydion and Math began to work their magick. They formed a magickal, divine wife named Blodeuwedd for him out of 9 flowers. She was expected to of course marry him and be a loyal wife and though he loved her, she never loved him.
For three nights Lleu had left Blodeuwedd in charge of their… home and in that time a nobelman in need of a rest from his huntng activity took shelter there. His name was Gronw the Strong and the two fell in love.
Desperate to be free of her husband and marry her hunter love the two plotted to kill Lleu. After failed attempts Blodeuwedd tricked Lleu into revealing how he could be killed (only when special conditions were met was this possible).
After a year and a day of preparing for the right conditions Gronw made his attack on Lleu and wounded him; he did not manage to kill the God. Gwydion took defence of his foster-son and allowed Lleu to escape to heal. He killed Gronw and punished Blodeuwedd by turning her into an owl.

Spiritual Information:- Blodeuwedd is a Maiden Goddess yet this does not permit her to never having enjoyed the love of a man. She is independant in her body and choices, despite the bounds of an unwilling marriage. Even though she seems to be under the rule of man, by her creation, marriage, and punishment, she was there before Gwydion and Math invoked her. Her lovemaking with the Hunter and her connection to flowers ma…kes her the walking feminine spirit of the land. She is the embodiment of the Goddess in her many guises as shown by her multi-faceted personality.
She compliments Lleu in that he is the Light Eagle God of the Day, and she is the Dark Owl of the Night. She is mated to the God of the Light side of the year and the God of the Dark side of the year, mirroring the wheel of the year and the battle of the solstices; her double faces or light and dark reflect the Goddesses role in this.
She is the Maiden in her independance, youth, beauty and strength; the mother in her sexuality, love and lust; the crone in her cunning, death and the night owl.
In some cases Gronw the Strong can be seen as a manifestation of the Horned Hunter God Cernunnos and so it would be fitting to Couple Blodeuwedd with both he and Lleu.

* Owls
* Flowers
* Bright colours and Dark colours.
* Green
* Maiden Mother Crone

* Flowers
* Floral Incense
* Bean, broom, burdock, meadowsweet, primrose, nettle, hawthorn, oak, and chestnut (flowers)

* Celebrate and worship Blodeuwedd in any of her stages of maiden mother crone, at Imbolc, Beltane or Samhain. She can also be thought of at the solstices as her two men battle over her.



Goddess Spirals


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Deity of the Day for July 19th is Themis The Greek Goddess

Deity of the Day


The Greek Goddess

TYPE: Areas of Influence: Themis the Greek Goddess was one of the ancient Titans. She was the Greek Goddess of divine justice, order and customs. In this role she sat in judgment of the recently deceased and decided whether they were sent to Tartarus or the Elysian Fields. This role is very similar to that of the earlier Egyptian Goddess Ma’at

She was the Goddess who called the Gods to assemble before Zeus and kept order during their lavish banquets.

Themis the Greek goddess also advised her husband on the principles of divine law and the rules of fate.

This Goddess also had the ability to foresee the future and was in charge of the Oracle of Delphi before she handed it over to Apollo.

Origins and Genealogy: This Deity was the daughter of Gaia and Ouranus, she had six brothers: Cronus, Oceanus, Hyperion, Lapetus, Cruis and Coeus and several sisters including Tethys, Theia, Pheobe and Mnemosyne.

With Zeus she had several children: Eunomia (order), Dike (justice), Eirene (peace) and the Moirai (the Fates). She is also considered by some to be the mother of Prometheus.

Strengths: Balancing and just able to predict the future.

Weaknesses: Very exacting in her standards.

Themis’s Symbolism

Themis is often shown blind folded holding the scales of justice.

Roman Equivalent of Themis: Lustitia

Themis’s Archetypes

The Judge:

The Judge’s role is to balance justice with compassion. Ensuring a distribution of power that provides realistic and fair boundaries that encourage people to take responsibility for their actions.

Shadow Judge misuses his power to enforce rules over others by manipulating laws. They are over critical and very judgmental of others, the sort of tyrant that makes you feel you are tip toeing round on eggshells trying not to draw their wrath.

This is an obvious choice of Archetype for Themis the Greek Goddess as she is Goddess of Justice.

The Visionary:

The Visionary is able to track probable outcomes for the future and able to envisage a better way of living for all mankind. They are clear channels for spirit communication.

Shadow Visionary sells their prophetic abilities to the highest bidder. They may even manipulate what they have seen to make it more palatable for their audience. The other shadow Visionary is so absorbed in their dreams that they are unable to function in the everyday world.

As keeper of the Oracle of Delphi Themis the Greek Goddess fits this Archetypal role. It is she that prophecies that Zeus will like his father before him be overthrown by one of his children.


How To Work With these Archetypes

The Judge:

The Judge is one of your Archetypes if you work in roles where you are often called upon to mediate between different sides. You may also have high standards and ideals which you encourage others to adopt.

This Archetype is an excellent one to work with if you are facing any legal proceedings or other situations in your life where you want justice to be done.

This Goddess should only be invoked if you wish to work with the universal laws of harmony and justice. If you are trying to enforce your own standards or seek revenge for perceived wrong doings you will be working with the Shadow aspect of the judge.

The Visionary:

You may be drawn to the Visionary if you possess psychic or visionary abilities yourself. The shadow aspect of this Archetype reminds you to use your gifts wisely and to remember to stay grounded in this reality.

You may also seek out this Archetype if you are at a cross roads in your life and are unsure what path to take. Work with this Goddess and look for the signs/symbols which will point you in the right direction. Remember that the path she indicates is the one for your highest good.



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Goddesses and Their Attributes

Goddesses and Their Attributes

Cultures around the world have long viewed the Goddess in many forms, with many faces. Our ancestors divided the Divine Feminine into lots of different deities and assigned certain attributes, powers, and responsibilities to each. Thus, individual goddesses express the various aspects of the feminine archetype.

Some depictions of the Goddess embody characteristics that are unique to the national or religious traditions of the people who worshiped her. In most cases, however, goddess figures express similar qualities, regardless of the country or faith with which they are associated.


The Greek goddess Aphrodite and the Romans’ Venus both represent love and beauty. Pele, the Hawaiian fire goddess, has much in common with Kali, the Indian goddess of destruction and rebirth. The Buddhist Kuan Yin and the Christian Mary both symbolize compassion.

Whatever she’s called, however her story is told, the inherent features of the Divine Feminine — fertility, creativity, compassion, wisdom, beauty, love, healing — can be seen in the deities of all cultures. Here are some of the world’s many goddesses and the attributes usually associated with them.

Goddesses of the World

Name Culture Attributes
Aino Finnish beauty
Amaterasu Japanese beauty, leadership, brightness
Aphrodite Greek love, beauty, sensuality
Artemis Greek courage, independence, protection
Axo Mama Peruvian fertility
Bast Egyptian playfulness, joy
Brigid Celtic creativity, smithcraft, inspiration, healing
Calypso Greek music
Ceres Roman nourishment, health
Ceridwin Celtic inspiration, wisdom
Concordia Roman peace
Cybele Asia Minor fertility
Diana Roman hunting, purity, independence
Freya Norse love, healing, sensuality
Hathor Egyptian love
Hecate Greek magick, death, wisdom
Inanna Sumerian journeys, facing fears, courage, grief
Isis Egyptian art, nourishment, wholeness, awakening
Kali Indian transformation, destruction, change
Kuan Yin Chinese compassion, humanitarianism, mercy
Lakshmi Indian wealth, abundance
Medea Greek magick
Pele Hawaiian fiery spirit, destruction and rebirth, vitality
Sekmet Egyptian grace, dignity, strength
Siva Slavic fertility
Sophia Greek wisdom, primal power
Uttu Sumerian creativity
Tara Indian nourishment, protection, compassion
Tiamet Babylonian power, magick, protection
Wang-mu Chinese immortality
Yemaja Nigerian secrets, dreams, childbirth, purification

On days when a witch wishes to connect with certain qualities in herself or wants to strengthen abilities she feels are weak, she can ask for help from a goddess who embodies those beneficial qualities. Say you have an important business meeting coming up and you want to make a good impression. The Egyptian sun goddess Sekmet, depicted as a lioness, symbolizes the attributes you desire to accomplish your goals. Align yourself with her energy to accomplish your aims.

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The Divine Feminine

The Divine Feminine

Perhaps the most profound and omnipresent symbol of the Divine Feminine is Mother Earth herself. Concern for the environment and “green” practices demonstrate respect for the Goddess, who is manifest in all of nature. It’s no accident that movements honoring the earth and the Goddess evolved simultaneously. Indeed, many witches believe that unless Goddess energy reawakens within each of us and in the world as a whole, the planet may be destroyed.

Witches often depict the Goddess in three stages that represent the three phases of a woman’s life: maiden, mother, and crone. Celtic art illustrates this tripart nature as three interlocking pointed loops called vesica piscis, which symbolize the opening to the womb. Others show the feminine trinity as three phases of the moon: waxing, waning, and full.

The Maiden

The Maiden Goddess signifies youth. In this aspect, she symbolizes innocence, hope, joy, curiosity, flexibility, courage, and enthusiasm. Greco-Roman mythology expressed this phase of the Goddess as Luna, the chaste moon goddess. Diana, Artemis, Eos, Renpet, Bast, and Persephone also characterize the maiden aspect of the Divine Feminine.

In magickal work, the following can serve as symbolic associations for the Maiden:

  • Baby animals (before puberty)
  • The colors silver, white, and light blue
  • Lightweight clothing and delicate fabrics such as gauze, lace, thin cotton, and silk
  • Clear quartz, pearl, diamond, aquamarine
  • The chaste tree, meadowsweet, lemongrass, white rose, hyacinth, narcissus, crocus, apple blossoms, peach blossoms, lilac, gardenia
  • The morning hours of the day, from dawn until noon
  • The spring months
  • The waxing moon

The Mother

The Mother Goddess signifies maturity. Her attributes include fertility, creativity, nurturing, comfort, abundance, strength, sensuality, confidence, and power. Pele, Gaia, Freya, Isis, Ceres, Demeter, Brigid, Oshun, Yemaja, Aphrodite, Venus, Tara, and Mary are among the goddesses who personify the mother phase of the Divine Feminine.

In magickal work, the following can serve as symbolic associations for the Mother:

  • Pregnant or nursing animals
  • Rich colors: ruby red, forest green, royal blue, and amber
  • Luxurious clothing and fabrics including velvet, damask, cashmere, silk, and mohair
  • Geode, emerald, turquoise, opal, coral, rose quartz, amber
  • Apple, pomegranate, peach, raspberry, strawberry, red clover, red rose, mint, iris, jasmine, cinnamon, parsley, daisy, myrtle, orchid, saffron
  • The afternoon hours, from noon to sunset
  • Summer through the harvest season
  • The full moon

The Crone

The Crone signifies the years after menopause. In some traditions, a woman is considered a Crone after she has experienced her second Saturn Return (usually at about age fifty-eight). The attributes inherent in this aspect of the Divine Feminine include wisdom, intuition, prophecy, stability, pragmatism, patience, detachment, and fortitude.


The last phase of womanhood, the crone period, is the one usually associated with witches. The traditional images of the ancient crone or hag aren’t attractive, but that reaction is not surprising. Humans are afraid of mortality and the Crone reminds one of old age and death.

Sophia, Hecate, Ceridwen, White Buffalo Woman, Butterfly Woman, Kali, Lilith, Baba Yaga, and Kuan Yin are among the goddesses who personify the crone phase of the Divine Feminine. In magickal work, the following can serve as symbolic associations for the Crone:

  • Old animals
  • Dark colors: brown, black, midnight blue, purple
  • Heavy clothing (often robes) and fabrics including wool, linen, and velvet
  • Smoky quartz, jet, onyx, amethyst, fossils
  • Holly, mandrake, pine, juniper, mistletoe, nightshade, nuts, oak, moss, wintergreen, ginseng; also dried or withered plants
  • The hours from sunset to dawn
  • Late fall and winter
  • The waning moon
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The Charge Of The Crone

Witchy Comments

The Charge Of The Crone

by Jim Garrison


Hear the words of the Dark Goddess who stands within the
crossroads, whose torch illuminates the Underworld:

I am the Queen of Magic and the dark of the Moon, hidden in
the deepest night. I am the mystery of the Otherworld and the fear
that coils about your heart in the time of your trials. I am the soul
of nature that gives form to the universe; it is I who await you at the
end of the spiral dance. Most ancient among gods and mortals, let my
worship be within the heart that has truly tasted life, for behold all acts
of magic and art are my pleasure and my greatest ritual is love itself.
Therefore let there be beauty in your strength, compassion in your
wrath, power in your humility, and discipline balanced through mirth
and reverence. You who seek to remove my veil and behold my true
face, know that all your questioning and efforts are for nothing, and all
your lust and desires shall avail you not at all. For unless you know my
mystery, look wherever you will, it will elude you, for it is within you and
nowhere else. For behold, I have ever been with you, from the very
beginning, the comforting hand that nurtured you in the dawn of life,
and the loving embrace that awaits you at the end of each life, for I am
that which is attained at the end of the dance, and I am the womb of new
beginnings, as yet unimagined and unknown.

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