The Goddesses

My Mother, My Lady, My Moon Goddess In The Sky

Celtic Comments & Graphics

 My Mother, My Lady, My Moon Goddess In The Sky

When Lady Luna shines above

Full and silver, bright with love

Witches draw her down for power

At the midnight witching hour.

~Magickal Graphics~

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The Sacred Herbs Of The Goddesses

The Sacred Herbs Of The Goddesses:

 

Aphrodite: olive, cinnamon, daisy, cypress, quince.  orris (iris), apple, myrtle

Arcadia: rue, vervain

Artemis:  silver fir, amaranth, cypress, cedar, hazel, myrtle, willow, daisy, mugwort, date palm

Astarte: alder, pine, cypress, myrtle, juniper

Athena: olive, apple

Bast: catnip, Vervain

Bellona: belladonna

Brigit: blackberry

Cailleach: wheat

Cardea: hawthorn, bean, arbutus

Ceres: willow, wheat, bay, pomegranate, poppy, leek, narcissus

Cybele: oak, myrrh, pine

Demeter: wheat, barley, pennyroyal, myrrh, rose, pomegranate, bean, poppy, all cultivated crops

Diana: birch, willow, acacia, wormwood, dittany, hazel, beech, fir, apple, mugwort, plane, mulberry, rue

Druantia: fir

Freya:  cowslip, daisy, primrose, maidenhair, myrrh, strawberry, mistletoe

Hathor: myrtle, sycamore, grape, mandrake, coriander, rose

Hecate: willow, henbane, aconite, yew, mandrake, cyclamen, mint, cypress, date palm, sesame, dandelion, garlic, oak, onion

Hekat: cypress

Hera: apple, willow, orris, pomegranate, myrrh

Hina: bamboo

Hulda: flax, rose, hellebore, elder

Irene: olive

Iris: wormwood, iris

Ishtar: acacia, juniper, all grains

Isis: fig, heather, wheat, wormwood, barley, myrrh, rose, palm, lotus, per sea, onion, iris, vervain

Juno: lily, crocus, asphodel, quince, pomegranate, vervain, iris, lettuce, fig, mint

Cerridwen: vervain, acorns

Minerva: olive, mulberry, thistle

Nefer-Tum: lotus

Nepthys: myrrh, lily

Nuit: sycamore

Olwen: apple

Persephone: parsley, narcissus, willow, pomegranate

Rhea: myrrh, oak

Rowen: clover, rowen

Venus: cinnamon, daisy, elder, heather, anemone, apple, poppy, violet, marjoram, maidenhair fern, carnation, aster, vervain, myrtle, orchid, cedar, lily, mistletoe, pine, quince

Vesta: oak

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Deity of the Day for November 24th is Arachne

Deity of the Day

Arachne

Greek Spider Goddess.

A Lydian girl skilled in weaving, she dared to challenge Athene to compete with her. The contest was held, and Arachne’s work was faultless: impudently, it portrayed some of the Gods’ less reputable deeds, including Athene’s father Zeus abducting Europa. Furious, Athene turned her into a spider, doomed eternally to spin thread drawn from her own body. But the Spider Goddess is more archetypal than this story suggests: spinning and weaving the pattern of destiny like the Moerae or the Norns, and enthroned in the middle of her spiral-pathed stronghold like Arianrhod. Athene here represents Athenian patriarchal thinking, trying to discipline earlier Goddess-concepts.

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Great Mother Goddesses

Great Mother Goddesses

Gods/Goddesses- Bel, the Dagda, Don, the Dagda, Bel, Cronus, Uranus, Zeus, Jupiter, Saturn, Amen, Osiris, Ra, Pachacamac, Cerridwen, Danu, Macha, Morrigu, Brigit, Anu, Badb, Rhianon, Demeter, Hera, Rhea, Hecate, Aphrodite, Gaea, Juno, Venus, Ceres, Ops, Bona Dea, Cybele, Isis, Mut, Nut, Coatlicue, Kuan Yin, Ishtar, Astarte, Inanna, Cerridwen, Danu, Morrigu, Anu, Margawse, Growth, Demeter, Gaea, Boreas, Eurus, Ceres
Color- Indigo, Black
Incense/Oil- Holly, Juniper, Yew, Myrrh, Cypress
Animals- Goat
Spirits- Dragon
Stones- Onyx, Jet
Metal- Lead
Plants- Reeds, Solomon’s Seal, Oak, Yew, Beech, Comfrey, Elm, Holly, Ivy, Horsetail, Juniper, Mullien
Wood- Oak
Planet- Saturn
Tarot Cards- Four Queens, Four Threes
Magickal Tools- Sword, Wand
Direction- West
Rituals- Stabilization of Thought and Life, Help with Groups, Comfort, Goddess Power, Developing Power of Faith

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Goddesses for every occasion

Goddesses for every occasion

——————————————————————————–
Sunday          Sunne, Frau Sonne, Aditi, Amaterasu, Arinna, Izanami, Ochumare

Monday          Luna, Selene, Diana, Re, Gealach, Ida, Artemis, Yemaya, Erzulie

Tuesday         Pingalla, Anna, Aine, Danu, Yngona, Bellona, Aida Wedo, Sun  Woman

Wednesday       Isis, Demeter, Ceres, Spider Woman, Bona Dea, Oya, Devi-Kali, Hella, Rhiannon, Coatlique

Thursday        Juno, Hera, Kwan Yin, Mary, Cybele, Tara, Mawu, Waresa, Ishtar

Friday          Freya, Astarte, Aphrodite, Erzulie, Eve, Venus, Isis, Diana,  Chalchiuhtlique

Saturday        Ops, Rhea, Tellus mater, Gaia, Eartha, Ge, Ashera, the Shekinah, Mary, Demeter, Herodias

Goddesses of the Zodiac:

Aries = Athena, The Morrigan, Minerva
Taurus = Hathor, Isis, Io, Venus, Selene
Gemini = Kali, Parvati, Tefnut, Leda
Cancer = Ix Chel, Ida, Selene, Luna
Leo = Arinna, Cybele, Neshto, Juno
Virgo = Kwan Yin, Bel, Inanna, Diana, Ishtar
Libra = Ishtar, Aphrodite, Dike, Themis
Scorpio = Pele, Tiamat, Ishara, Selket
Sagittarius = Artemis, Diana, Pingala
Capricorn = Awehai, Ida, Amalthea, Vesta
Aquarius = Mawu, Cybele, Sophia, Iris, Juno
Pisces = Nammu, Anuit, Aphrodite, Dione

Goddesses of the Month:

January  = Juno, Hera, Hestia, Brigid
February = Brigid, White Buffalo Woman, Juno Februa
March  = Ra-Nuit, Artemis, Minerva
April  = Aphrodite, Ishtar, Artemis, Astarte, Eostre
Venus, Terra , Erzulie
May  = Maia, Flora, Tanith, Bel, Mary, Hera
June   = Ishtar, Athena, Demeter, Juno, Persephone,
Luna, Hera, Mawu
July   = Ishtar, Apet, Athena, Demeter, Persephone,
Spider Woman.
August  = Ishtar, Ceres, Lakshmi, Hesperus
September= Hathor, Ishtar, Yemaya, Menkhet, Pomona
October  = Hathor, Demeter, Ceres, the Horae
November = Sekhmet, Demeter, Diana, Kali, Astrae
December = Vesta, Hestia, Befana, Sekhmet, Oya

Hestia        26 December   – 22 January
Bridhe        23 January    – 19 February
Moura         20 February   – 19 March
Columbina     20 March      – 17 April
Maia          18 April      – 15 May
Hera          16 May        – 12 June
Rosea         13 June       – 10 July
Kerea         11 July       –  8 August
Hesperis       9 August     –  5 September
Mala           6 September  –  2 October
Hathor         3 October    – 30 October
Cailleach/
Samhain       31 October    – 27 November
Astraea       28 November   – 25 December

Goddesses for the days of the Moon/month:

1       (new moon)  Hathor, Isis, Anahit, Selene, Juno, Lucina, Luna, Re,
Blodeuwedd.

2       Selene, Luna, the Mothers, Gos, Arstat, Saoka

3       Athena, the Witch of Gaeta, Rata

4       Hathor, Isis, Selene, Luna

5       Maat, the Erinyes, Eric, Terra, the Eumenides

6       Artemis, Erzulie, the Mothers

7       the Sabbatu, Leto, Luna, Arstat

8       Selene, Luna, Ata Bey

9       Rhea, Selene, Spider Woman

10      Anahit, Anaitis, White Buffalo Calf Woman

11      Kista, Athena, Minerva, Sophia, Changing Woman

12      Demeter, Oddudua, Dikaiosune

13      The Muses, Diana, Oya, the Corn Mothers

14      Ishtar, Selene, Gos, Aida Wedo, the Lady, the Great Mother

15      Ishtar, Luna, Mene, Anna Perenna, Mary, Hina, Arianrhod, Aradia, Diana, Cybele, Mah

16      Levanah, Selene, Luna, Kwan Yin, Chalchiuhtlique

17      Ashi Vanguhi, Arstat, Kista, Demeter, Luna, Aida Wedo

18      Ochumare, Mawu, Copper Woman

19      The Manes, Ashi Vanguhi, Minerva

20      Selene, Tonantzin, Coatlique, Mary

21      Drvaspa, Hera, Athene, Medusa

22      Re, Gealach, Rhiannon, Selene, Mayauel

23      Venus, Aphrodite, Oshun, Erzulie, Freya, Xochiquetzl

24      Daena, Kista, Ochumare, Maat, Sophia, Chang-O

25      Ashi Vanguhi, Ard, Kista, Athena

26      Arstat, Cerridwen, Copper Woman, Mother Holle

27      Diana, Hecate, Maman Brigette, Oya

28      Zamyad, Tellus Mater, Hemera, Eos

29      Hecate, Tonantzin, Nyx, Rhiannon, Eurydice

30      Hecate, Mene, Hecate Prosmna, the moon Goddess, the Dark Maiden, the Crone.

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Invocation to the Goddess

Invocation to the Goddess

 

Thou who whispers gentle yet strong
Thou for whom my soul doth long,
By most men you are seldom seen
Yet you ever reign as Virgin, Mother, Queen.
Through the veil you pass with pride
As I beckon thee now to be at my side.

Thou who knows, thou who conceals
Thou who gives birth, thou who feels,
For you are the Goddess and Mother of all
Pray thee now come as I call,
Now through the mist, I hear your voice
And invoke thee most gracious Goddess by choice.

Thou who suffers as all men die
Doth with her victim in love lie,
For you are the Goddess and Crone of despair
To our ending we all must share,
I feel thy passion and feel thy presence
I desire to be one with thy vital essence.

I pray thee dancer of eternal bliss
Bestow upon me thy wondrous kiss,
Let now thy light, love and power
Descend, become one with me this hour.
For you are the Creatress of Heaven and Earth
To my soul and spirit you have given birth.

 

More Fantasy Comments

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About The Goddess Cailleach October 31 – Novenber

Cailleach

October 31 – November 27

In Irish and Scottish mythology, the Cailleach, Irish plural cailleacha [ˈkalʲəxə], Scottish Gaelic plural cailleachan /kaʎəxən/), also known as the Cailleach Bheur, is a divine hag, a creatrix, and possibly an ancestral deity or deified ancestor. The word Cailleach means ‘hag’ in modern Scottish Gaelic, and has been applied to numerous mythological figures in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.

In Scotland, where she is also known as Beira, Queen of Winter, she is credited with making numerous mountains and large hills, which are said to have been formed when she was striding across the land and accidentally dropped rocks from her apron. In other cases she is said to have built the mountains intentionally, to serve as her stepping stones. She carries a hammer for shaping the hills and valleys, and is said to be the mother of all the goddesses and gods.

The Cailleach displays several traits befitting the personification of Winter: she herds deer, she fights Spring, and her staff freezes the ground.

In partnership with the goddess Brìghde, the Cailleach is seen as a seasonal deity or spirit, ruling the winter months between Samhainn (1 November or first day of winter) and Bealltainn (1 May or first day of summer), while Brìghde rules the summer months between Bealltainn and Samhainn. Some interpretations have the Cailleach and Brìghde as two faces of the same goddess, while others describe the Cailleach as turning to stone on Bealltainn and reverting back to humanoid form on Samhainn in time to rule over the winter months. Depending on local climate, the transfer of power between the winter goddess and the summer goddess is celebrated any time between Là Fhèill Brìghde (1 February) at the earliest, Latha na Cailliche (25 March), or Bealltainn (1 May) at the latest, and the local festivals marking the arrival of the first signs of spring may be named after either the Cailleach or Brìghde.

Là Fhèill Brìghde is also the day the Cailleach gathers her firewood for the rest of the winter. Legend has it that if she intends to make the winter last a good while longer, she will make sure the weather on 1 February is bright and sunny, so she can gather plenty of firewood to keep herself warm in the coming months.As a result, people are generally relieved if Là Fhèill Brìghde is a day of foul weather, as it means the Cailleach is asleep, will soon run out of firewood, and therefore winter is almost over. On the Isle of Man, where She is known as Caillagh ny Groamagh, the Cailleach is said to have been seen on St. Bride’s day in the form of a gigantic bird, carrying sticks in her beak.

In Scotland, the Cailleachan (lit. ‘old women’) are also known as The Storm Hags, and seen as personifications of the elemental powers of nature, especially in a destructive aspect. They are said to be particularly active in raising the windstorms of spring, during the period known as A’ Chailleach.

On the west coast of Scotland, the Cailleach ushers in winter by washing her great plaid (Gaelic: féileadh mòr) in the Whirlpool of Coire Bhreacain. This process is said to take three days, during which the roar of the coming tempest is heard as far away as twenty miles (32 km) inland. When she is finished, her plaid is pure white and snow covers the land.

In Scotland and Ireland, the first farmer to finish the grain harvest made a corn dolly, representing the Cailleach (also called “the Carlin or Carline”), from the last sheaf of the crop. The figure would then be tossed into the field of a neighbor who had not yet finished bringing in their grain. The last farmer to finish had the responsibility to take in and care for the corn dolly for the next year, with the implication they’d have to feed and house the hag all winter. Competition was fierce to avoid having to take in the Old Woman.

Some scholars believe the Old Irish poem, ‘The Lament of the Old Woman of Beare’ is about the Cailleach; Kuno Meyer states, ‘…she had fifty foster-children in Beare. She had seven periods of youth one after another, so that every man who had lived with her came to die of old age, and her grandsons and great-grandsons were tribes and races.

Etymology

The word cailleach (in modern Irish and Scottish Gaelic, ‘old woman’) comes from the Old Irish caillech (‘veiled one’), an adjectival form of Old Irish caille “veil”, an early loan from Latin pallium (‘cloak’, an ecclesiastical garment worn by nuns; displaying the expected p > c change of early loans).  The word is found as a component in terms like the Gaelic cailleach-dhubh (‘nun’) and cailleach-oidhche (‘owl’), as well as the Irish cailleach feasa (‘wise woman’, ‘fortune-teller’) and cailleach phiseogach (‘sorceress’, ‘charm-worker’).

Related words include the Gaelic caileag (‘young woman’, ‘girl] and the Lowland Scots carline/carlin (‘old woman’, ‘witch’). A more obscure word that is sometimes interpreted as ‘hag’ is the Irish síle, which has led some to speculate on a connection between the Cailleach and the stonecarvings of Sheela na Gigs.

Locations associated with the Cailleach

Ireland

In Ireland she is also associated with craggy, prominent mountains and outcroppings, such as Hag’s Head (Irish: Ceann Caillí, meaning “hag’s head”) the southernmost tip of the Cliffs of Moher in County Clare. The megalithic tombs at Loughcrew in County Meath are situated atop Slieve na Calliagh (Irish: Sliabh na Caillí, meaning “the hag’s mountain”) and include a kerbstone known as “the hag’s chair”. Cairn T on Slieve na Calliagh is a classic passage tomb, in which the rays of the equinox sunrise shine down the passageway and illuminate an inner chamber filled with megalithic stonecarvings.

Scotland

The Cailleach is prominent in the landscape of Argyll and Bute, Scotland. In later tales she is known as the Cailleach nan Cruachan (“the witch of Ben Cruachan”). Ben Cruachan is the tallest mountain in the region. Tea-towels and postcards of her are sold in the visitor shop for the Hollow Mountain, which also features a mural depicting her accidental creation of Loch Awe.

Legend has it that the Cailleach was tired from a long day herding deer. Atop Ben Cruachan she fell asleep on her watch and a well she was tending overflowed, running down from the highlands and flooding the valleys below, forming first a river and then the loch.The overflowing well is a common motif in local Gaelic creation tales – as seen in the goddess Boann’s similar creation of the River Boyne in Ireland. Other connections to the region include her above-mentioned strong ties with the fierce whirlpool in the Gulf of Corryvreckan.

Beinn na Caillich on the Isle of Skye is one of her haunts, as are other mountains which are prominent in the landscape, and from which fierce storms of sleet and rain descend, wreaking havoc and destruction upon the lands below.

There is a Glen Cailleach which joins to Glen Lyon in Perthshire. The glen has a stream named Alt nan Cailleach. This area is famous for a pagan ritual which according to legend is associated to the Cailleach. There is a small Shieling in the Glen, known as either Tigh nan Cailleach or Tigh nam Bodach, which houses a series of apparently carved stones. These stones, according to local legend, represent the Cailleach her husband the Bodach and their children.

The local legend suggests that the Cailleach and her family were given shelter in the glen by the locals and while they stayed there the glen was always fertile and prosperous. When they left they gave the stones to the locals with the promise that as long as the stones were put out to look over the glen at Beltane and put back into the shelter and made secure for the winter at Samhain then the glen would continue to be fertile.

This ritual is still carried out to this day.

 

Reference:

The Wikipedia

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AUTUMN GODDESS CHARGE

Autumn Comments & Graphics
AUTUMN GODDESS CHARGE

I am the waning moon

The Goddess who is fading from the land

In the Springtime I sought my Lord

And mated with him beneath the trees and stars

At Beltane I wed my Lord

Beneath the first blossoms of the hawthorn tree

And in the Summertime I ripened the apples in the orchards

And the fruit grew round and strong

At the corn harvest I cut down my Lord

That by his death our people might be fed

And now in the Autumn time

I descend beneath the Earth

To dwell with my Lord in his dark kingdom

Until our child is born

At the Winter Solstice I will bring forth the child

And renew your hope

And at Candlemas I myself will return

To renew the land

I leave you, but I return to you

When you see my power fade

And the leaves fall from the trees

When snow obliterates like death

All trace of me upon the Earth

Then look for me in the Moon

And in the heavens, you will see the soul of me

Soaring still among the stars

And in that darkest time

When the Moon is covered by shadow

And there is no trace of me in Heaven or on Earth

When you look outward and your lives seem cold and dark and barren

Let not despair eat at your hearts.

For when I am hidden

I am but renewing

When I am waning

I am making ready for return

Remember my promise and look within you

And there you will find the spirit of me

Awaiting those who will seek

For by the well-spring of your being

I await you always.

I am Diana in Heaven

And on Earth, Persephone

And within you that dark Hecate

Triple am I

The One in Three

My body the Earth

My soul the Moon

And within thine innermost self

The eternal spirit of me.

~Magickal Graphics~

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