Deities

Deity of the Day for July 10th is Ceres Goddess of Agriculture

Deity of the Day

Ceres

Goddess of Agriculture

 

Areas of Influence: Ceres was the Roman Goddess of agriculture and grain. The word cereal is derived from her name.

After a terrible famine in 496 B.C. the Sibylline books recommended the adoption of the Greek Deities Demeter, Dionyisus and Persephone. Their identities were changed to Ceres, Liber and Libera. Together they formed the Avertine triad.

This Goddess also adopted Demeter’s mythology as she also lost her daughter to the God of the underworld.

Her early Italian cult was similar to that of Tellus the Earth Goddess. She was aided in her agricultural duties by twelve minor Gods and Goddesses.

Her main temple is situated on Aventine Hill.

Her other claim to fame is that she is the Patron Goddess of Enna, Sicily.

Origins and Genealogy: In Roman mythology she was the daughter of Saturn and Ops. She had several brothers and sisters: Juno, Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto and Vesta. She married her brother Jupiter and together they had a daughter named Proserpina.

Strengths: Fertility, abundance and endurance.

Weaknesses: Lived her life through her daughter.

Greek Equivalent: Demeter

Cere’s Symbolism

Pictured carrying a scepter or a farming tool in one hand and a basket of fruit or grain in the other.

Sacred Animal: Pigs. Ants were used in her temples to predict the weather and the future.

Sacred Plants: The chaste trees corn and pumpkins. She was also offered the first fruits of the harvest.

Festivals: Her main festival, the Cerealia was celebrated on 19th April. This Goddess was also celebrated annually by woman in the Ambarvalia which was held in May.

Cere’s Archetypes

The Mother:

The Mother Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

Ceres is a grain Goddess who teaches people how to nurture and harvest her crops. Later she also takes on the Mother role of her Greek counterpart Demeter.

Rescuer:

The Rescuer provides strength and support to others in crisis. They act out of love with no expectation of a reward.

The shadow Rescuer expects the rescued party to be grateful and will often try to keep that person needy.

Ceres is distraught when her daughter goes missing and does not rest until she has found her. She is frustrated as she is unable to save her daughter and is forced to compromise.

How To Work With These Archetypes

The Mother:

It is not necessary to be a biological mother to have this Archetype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

Rescuer:

The Rescuer is one of your Archetypes if you are always trying to save and help people.

What you need to ask yourself is what motivates you to act this way? Are you expecting a reward for your trouble or do you love helping others?

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for July 9th is Hel, Goddess of the Underworld

Deity of the Day

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Hel

Norse Goddess of the Underworld

 

In Norse mythology, Hel features as the goddess of the underworld. She was sent by Odin to Helheim/Niflheim to preside over the spirits of the dead, except for those who were killed in battle and went to Valhalla. It was her job to determine the fate of the souls who entered her realm.

Hel is often depicted with her bones on the outside of her body rather than the inside. She is typically portrayed in black and white, as well, showing that she represents both sides of all spectrums.

She is a daughter of Loki, the trickster, and Angrboda. It is believed that her name is the source of the English word “hell,” because of her connection to the underworld. Hel appears in the Poetic Edda and Prose Edda, and to sentence someone to “go to Hel” means to wish them death. Following the death of Baldur, the goddess Frigga sends Hermóðr to offer Hel ransom. Hermóðr stays the night at Helheim, and in the morning begs Hel to allow his brother to return home, because Baldur is so loved by the gods of the Æsir. Hel tells him, “If all things in the world, alive or dead, weep for him, then he will be allowed to return to the Æsir. If anyone speaks against him or refuses to cry, then he will remain with Hel.” A female giant refuses to feel bad for Baldur, so he is stuck with Hel for a bit longer.

Jacob Grimm theorized that Hel, whom he called by the Proto-Germanic name Halja, was in fact a “half-goddess.” She cannot be proven to be of full Divine blood; in Hel’s case, Loki impregnated the giantess Angrboda. Grimm said that these half-blooded goddess stood in higher standing than their half-blood male counterparts.

 

Source:

By , About.com

 

 

 

 

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Deity of the Day of July 7th is Fauna, Goddess of Prophecy and Fruitfulness

Deity of the Day

Fauna

Goddess of Prophecy and Fruitfulness

Fauna is an old Roman Goddess of Prophecy and Fruitfulness, with ties to the forest and fields and the animals found there. She is closely related to the God Faunus; She is variously His wife, sister, or daughter. Her name, like Faunus’s, is from the Latin faveo, “to befriend, support, or back up”, from which we get our “favor”; an alternate etymology is from fari, “to speak, talk, or say”, referring to Their powers of prophecy. Her name then could be variously translated as “She Who Favors”, “the Friendly One”, “the Speaker”, or even “She Who Has Your Back”. She was identified with the prophetic Goddess Fatua, again meaning, “the Speaker”, but with additional meanings of “She Who Speaks Prophecy”, or “the Oracle”.

Fauna’s origins are in Latium, the land of the Latins, the people of the area around Rome, and She is closely associated with them. According to yet another of the Roman stories glorifying the city’s origins, Fauna was one of the Hyperborians, who were believed to live far in the north (hyperboreas in the Greek literally means “beyond the North Wind”), and said to worship Apollo. She hooked up with the hero Hercules and as a result gave birth to a son Latinus, later a king of the Latins, and therefore a mythical ancestor of the Roman people and a claim to the famous blood of Hercules. Faunus was Her second husband, Whom She married after Hercules left Her (per his usual modus operandi). Other stories reverse that, making Faunus Her original husband, and then make Her relationship with Hercules an extramarital affair. Still other stories name Faunus as the father of Latinus, by the river nymph Marica, Who was Herself identified with Aphrodite, the Greek Love Goddess.

In a similar vein, Fauna was sometimes judged to be a prostitute or courtesan; though this seems to be a late tale and may simply be a reaction to Her as a Goddess of Fertility. Her husband Faunus was sometimes said to be the same as the God Inuus, a God of sex, intercourse, and fertility, Whose name is supposedly from a Latin verb inire, “to copulate”; and since She is supposed to be the female equivalent of Faunus, that would make Her a Goddess of sex and copulation as well. Faunus was sometimes said to be the God for Whom the Lupercalia, a very old festival of purification and renewed fertility with strong sexual overtones, was celebrated; and two Faunalia, rural festivals of feasting and dancing, were celebrated to Them, on the Ides of February (the 13th, and in the old lunar calendar, the full moon) and the 5th of December.

In other legends however, Fauna is known for Her chastity and modesty; She was said to never leave Her grove or let a man look upon Her, and no man was allowed in Her temple. These tales are associated with the Bona Dea, “the Good Goddess”, said to be a cult name of Fauna. The Bona Dea, called so because Her true name was considered too sacred to be spoken aloud, is a Goddess of women and healing Whose worship was exclusive to women, men being forbidden to participate in Her rites. Perhaps Her virginity or chastity was a way of explaining why She would not allow men in Her rituals, and was the Roman way of rationalizing a Goddess Who was purely concerned with women.

Far more is known of Faunus than Fauna; His tales may perhaps shed some light on Her attributes and personality. Faunus was a very popular and ancient God Who protected and watched over livestock and Who haunted fields and the forest. As a prophetic God, He used both dreams and His own disembodied voice to reveal the future, and had a shrine in Tivoli at the grove of Albunea where prophetic dreaming was practiced. Their father was usually said to be the prophetic God Picus; though Their mother is not mentioned, Picus was famous for His devotion to Canens, a forest nymph known for Her beautiful singing voice. Though myth is not necessarily that straightforward about things, Canens and Faunus do have a bit in common as They were both known as “the Voice of the Woods”. Canens in turn is associated with the witch Kirke, as Kirke was also enamoured of Picus, though She couldn’t steal Him away from Canens; and Latinus is sometimes said to be the son of Kirke and the famous Greek traveller and all-around tricksy guy Odysseus, or his son Telemakhos.

In some legends told of the Bona Dea, Faunus does not treat Her well at all; in one, She is His daughter; He lusts after Her, and when She rejects Him, He gets Her drunk and beats Her with sticks of myrtle, and then rapes Her as a serpent. In another, He beats Her to death, again with myrtle branches, for the crime of drinking. These legends seem to have been created to explain why both myrtle and wine played a part in the rites of the Bona Dea; they also emphasize Faunus’s wild, untamed and dangerous nature. The names Fauna and Faunus “the Friendly One(s)” may well have been placating names, to keep the worshipper on Their good sides, much like the fairies of Celtic lore are called “the Good Folk”, so as to prevent any harm they might do. Fauna and Faunus were known to travel with an entourage of fauns (yes, like Mr. Tumnus, though without the Christian/Aslanic associations), wild and mischevious spirits of the countryside, equated with the satyrs of the Greeks, and believed to cause nightmares. Faunus Himself was identified with the Greek Pan, the Wild God par excellence.

It would seem, then, that Fauna represents the thin line separating the wild from the untamed, as Goddess of both the dark mysterious forest and the cultivated fields, and Her very name is now used to refer to the animal kingdom, the fauna, (as opposed to the plant kingdom, called flora). As the Bona Dea was worshipped exclusively by women, Fauna is a Goddess of the wild sexuality of women, specifically sexual intercourse itself as an expression of the Life Force, and also of fertility (the latter was after all, until modern times and the invention of reliable contraception, a common result of the former). She brings prophecy through dreams and the voices of the wild places, and Her association with dreams and nightmares again connects to humanity’s dark and untamed nature. Several of the other Goddesses She is connected with were known as sorceresses and healers, such as Kirke and the Bona Dea (and by extension Angitia), which would make magic and healing another of Her attributes. All these Goddesses—The Bona Dea (and so majestic Maia as well) Angitia, Albunea, Canens, Marica, and even Kirke, whichever native Goddess She stands in for—can perhaps be thought of a constellation of related Goddesses of wild, magical, and sexual natures, possibly originally springing from the same source.

Alternate spellings: Faula; Fatuai seems to be Her Oscan name.

Also called: Fatua, Fatuella; She was called Damia at Tarentum (a city originally founded by Greek colonists), a name that refers to the secret sacrifice made to the Bona Dea.

Source:

The Obscure Goddess Online Dictionary

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Deity of the Day for July 6th is Isis, The Egyptian Goddess

Deity of the Day

Isis

The Egyptian Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Isis had numerous areas of influence. As her cult grew in popularity she absorbed the roles and titles of many earlier Goddesses including: Nekhebet, Bast, Hathor, Serket and Mut.

Her main roles are Mother and fertility Goddess and Goddess of magic and Healing.

The titles: Great Goddess, The Divine One and The One Who is All are a testament to the power and appeal of this Egyptian Goddess who had temples dedicated to her as far away as Britain.

She was described as the Goddess of Magic, Great Lady of Magic and Lady of the Words of Power. This was in recognition of her magical gifts and understanding of power of magical words. The ambitious Isis mastered these abilities after she poisoned Ra and offered to heal him in exchange for her secret name. By sharing this secret all Ra’s personal power and knowledge was transferred to Isis.

Together with Osiris she ruled the Gods until he was killed by Set, her jealous brother.

Unable to accept his death she used her magic and healing to bring Osiris back to life and he fathered her child Horus.

Set found out and destroyed Osiris again, Isis used magic once again and granted Osiris immortality.

The Goddess ran away and brought up Horus in secret. She is revered as an excellent mother and there are several works of art that depict her with her son on her lap. She also became a fertility and Earth Goddess as shown by the following titles: Lady of Green Crops, Mother of the Gods, Mother of the Universe, Queen of the Earth. In this role she became the protector and patron of woman and children.

This Goddess was associated with all of the elements: earth as a fertility Goddess, air through her association with wind especially the North wind, fire as a solar Deity she is described as Maker of the Sunrise and the Brilliant One in the Sky and lastly water as she was linked to the flooding of the Nile.

She had so many different areas of influence that she earnt the title of Lady of Ten Thousand Names.

Origins and Genealogy: She was the daughter of Nut and Geb, her siblings included Osiris whom she married and Set and Nephthys. Her only child was Horus.

Strengths: Ambitious and a loyal wife and mother.

Weaknesses: She wanted to win and maintain her power at any cost.

Isis’s Symbolism

Her name means female of the throne and she was often illustrated with a headdress showing an empty throne suggestive of both her husbands’ absence and that she was the seat of the Pharaoh’s power.

Alternatively she is shown with a solar disk and horns or even with a cow’s head.

In her funerary role she was often given wings and carried the Ankh symbolizing immortality.

Sacred Animal: The cow, snake and scorpion.

Sacred Birds: Hawks, swallows, doves and vultures.

Isis’s Archetpes

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

Isis is an archetypal Mother figure, a good mother to her son Isis, she is also said to have nursed the Egyptian Pharaoh and to have been a fertility Goddess for the Earth and her Followers.

The Witch

Uses knowledge of the universal laws of nature, the conscious mind and esoteric powers to manifest their desires.

The shadow Witch uses their gifts to increase their own power.

Isis is guilty of this when she uses magic to poison Ra and tricks him into giving her all his power and knowledge

 

How To Work With These Archetypes

The Mother: You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

The Witch: The Witch maybe one of your Archetypes can if you have the gift of understanding how to transform situations, influence people, and make your visions and dreams a reality.

The Shadow Witch reminds you not to use these abilities to gain power over others as this is not magic but sorcery.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

 

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Deity of the Day for July 5th – Hemera, Greek Goddess

Deity of the Day

Hemera

 

In Greek mythology Hemera (/ˈhɛmərə/; Ancient Greek: Ἡμέρα [hɛːméra] “day”) was the personification of day and one of the Greek primordial deities. She is the goddess of the daytime and, according to Hesiod, the daughter of Erebus and Nyx (the goddess of night). Hemera is remarked upon in Cicero’s De Natura Deorum, where it is logically determined that Dies (Hemera) must be a god, if Uranus is a god. The poet Bacchylides states that Nyx and Chronos are the parents, but Hyginus in his preface to the Fabulae mentions Chaos as the mother/father and Nyx as her sister.

She was the female counterpart of her brother and consort, Aether (Light), but neither of them figured actively in myth or cult. Hyginus lists their children as Uranus, Gaia, and Thalassa (the primordial sea goddess), while Hesiod only lists Thalassa as their child.

According to Hesiod’s Theogony, Hemera left Tartarus just as Nyx entered it; when Hemera returned, Nyx left:

“Nyx and Hemera draw near and greet one another as they pass the great threshold of bronze: and while the one is about to go down into the house, the other comes out at the door.”

Pausanias seems to confuse her with Eos when saying that she carried Cephalus away. Pausanias makes this identification with Eos upon looking at the tiling of the royal portico in Athens, where the myth of Eos and Kephalos is illustrated. He makes this identification again at Amyklai and at Olympia, upon looking at statues and illustrations where Eos (Hemera) is present.

 

Source:

Wikipedia

 

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Charge of the Horned God

Witchy Comments & Graphics

Charge of the Horned God

Listen to the words of the Horned God, the Guardian of all things wild and free,
and Keeper of the Gates of Death, whose Call all must answer:
 
 
I am the fire within your heart. The yearning of your Soul.
 
 
I am the Hunter of Knowledge and the Seeker of the Holy Quest;
I who stand in the darkness of light; I am He whom you have called Death.
 
 
I the Consort and Mate of Her we adore, call forth to thee.
Heed my call beloved ones, come unto me and learn the secrets of death and peace.
 
 
I am the corn at harvest and the fruit on the trees.
I am He who leads you home. Scourge and Flame,
Blade and Blood these are mine and gifts to thee.
 
 
Call unto me in the forest wild and on hilltop bare and seek me in the Darkness Bright.
I who have been called; Pan, Herne, Osiris ,
and Hades, speak to thee in thy search. Come dance and sing; come live and smile,
for behold: this is my worship.
 
 
You are my children and I am thy Father.
On swift night wings it is I who lay you at the Mother’s feet
to be reborn and to return again. Thou who thinks to seek me,
know that I am the untamed wind, the fury of storm and passion in your Soul.
Seek me with pride and humility, but seek me best with love and strength.
For this is my path, and I love not the weak and fearful.
Hear my call on long Winter nights and we shall stand
together guarding Her Earth as She sleeps.
 
 
Source:
Wicca Chat
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Deity of the Day for July 4th – Rhea, The Greek Goddess

Deity of the Day

Rhea

The Greek Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Rhea was an Earth Goddess, responsible for the fertility of the soil, women and motherhood. She took over most of these responsibilities from her mother Gaia/Gaea.

Her name means “flow” and “ease” relating to her role of the Great Mother where the flow refers to menstrual blood. It also links her to the tides and the moon.

She is closely identified with the Anatolian Great Mother Goddess, Cybele. They shared similar roles and symbolism.

Together with Cronus she ruled over the Titans. Her position as Queen was succeeded by Hera when the Titans were defeated by the Olympians.

This ancient deity had priest’s were called Curetes.

Origins and Genealogy: Her parents were Gaia and Uranus.

This Goddess had many brothers and sisters including the Titans: Cronus, Hyperion, Lapetus, Theia, Themis Mnemosyne, Pheobe and Tethys.

She married her brother Cronus and had six children by him: Demeter, Hera, Hestia, Hades Poseidon and Zeus.

Rhea was horrified when Cronus swallowed each of them whole at birth as he feared the fulfillment of a prophecy that predicted he would be overthrown by one of his children.

When Zeus was born she tricked her husband into swallowing a stone wrapped up in his swaddling clothes. Zeus was then hidden and taken to Crete.

Later, when Cronus was dethroned and imprisoned she had an affair with Olympus and gave birth to two more children, Alce and Midas.

Crete became the main centre of this Mother Goddesses cult.

Strengths: A Mother figure, generally gentle but becomes fearsome when crossed.

Weaknesses: She deserts her husbands but who can blame her?

Rhea’s Symbolism

Rhea is usually shown as a matronly woman with a turret crown, standing between two lions or on a chariot pulled by lions.

The moon is another one of her symbols representing her role as a fertility Goddess.

Other symbols include a lighted torch, brass drums and a double ax.

Sacred Animal: Lions,

Sacred Plants: Fruit bearing trees, pine and the oak.

Sacred Day: Saturday was devoted to this Goddess.

Her close ties with Cybele, link this Goddess to Spring Festivals held to honour the Great Mother. This celebration is the origin of Mothering Sunday.

Rhea’s Archetype

The Mother:

The Mother Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before her self is the essense of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

Rhea is a Mother Goddess caring for the earth. When it comes to the care of her own children her credentials as a loving mother are less convincing. She is unable to stand up to cruel husband and only saves them through trickery and by sending Zeus to be cared for in Crete.

How to Work with this Archetype

The Mother:

You do not need to be a biological mother to have this Archetype. The Mother Archetype refers to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to any living thing including plants and animals.

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow mother if you smother your children and are over protective. You need to encourage independence, allowing children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
The Goddess-Guide.com

 

 

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Deity of the Day for July 3rd – Minerva, Goddess of wisdom and crafts

Deity of the Day

Minerva

 

Areas of Influence: Minerva was the Goddess of wisdom and crafts.

Only in Rome was she worshipped as the Goddess of war.

This Goddess represented the application of intellect to everyday tasks. As the Goddess of wisdom she was accredited with inventing spinning, weaving, numbers and music.

She is also the patron of Goddess of medicine.

Ovid described her as the “Goddess of a thousand works.”

Origins and Genealogy: The name of this Goddess is said to be of Etruscan origin.

Her parents were Jupiter and Métis. Elements of the myths surrounding her birth however have been poached from Greek Goddess Athena, as she too is born fully grown, from her father’s head.

She was considered third among the Gods and Goddesses and was part of the Capitolian triad alongside Juna and Jupiter.

Strengths: Wisdom, creativity and strength.

Weaknesses: Out of touch with emotions.

Minerva’s Symbolism

The Roman Goddess of wisdom is depicted in full battle dress with a coat of mail, a helmet and a spear.

Sacred Animal/Insect: Owl and the spider.

Sacred Plants: Her sacred plants were the olive, mulberry and alder trees.

Festivals: The main festival celebrating this Goddess took place March 19th – 23rd.

A smaller festival occurred later in the year on the 13th of June.

Greek Equivalent: Athena

Minerva’s Archetypes

The Teacher/ Inventor:

The Teacher and Inventor communicates knowledge, experience and wisdom.

In it’s shadow aspect, the Teacher may manipulate and mislead their students by indoctrinating them with negative beliefs and destructive behaviours.

This is Minerva’s primary Archetype as she teaches humans how to spin and weave. She is also accredited in Roman mythology for inventing numbers and medicine.

The Warrior:

Archetype represents physical strength, and the ability to protect and fight for your rights and those of others.

The shadow side of the Warrior reflects the need to win at all costs, abandoning ethical principles to prove your supremacy.

Although Roman mythology borrows heavily from it’s Greek counterparts, it is only in Rome that Minerva is worshipped as the Goddess of war, despite always being depicted in full battle dress. This is why I have ranked this Archetype as only of secondary importance for this Goddess.

 

How To Work With These Archetypes

The Teacher/Inventor:

This Archetype may suggest a love of passing on wisdom and learning to others.

This Goddess wise counsel can also be called upon to help you see a way through any present difficulties or to help you to master a new skill.

The shadow aspect of this stereo type is also a reminder that whenever we find ourselves in a teaching or mentoring role we must aim to be a positive role model, encouraging others to reach their full potential.

The Warrior:

If you are drawn to work with this Goddess you may require her Warrior spirit to help you to stand up for your rights and set firm personal boundaries. This Goddess can be a great stereotype to work with if you want to take control in your life, and wish to no longer play the role of the victim.

You may also wish to call upon this Goddess to champion the cause of others.

Conversely this Goddess may appeal to you if you have a very strong sense of self and are proud of the victories you have achieved. The shadow side may be asking you to reflect honestly on the cost of these victories. Have they been at the expense of others or your principals?

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

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