Deities

Autumn Goddess Charge


Autumn Comments & Graphics
AUTUMN GODDESS CHARGE

I am the waning moon
The Goddess who is fading from the land
In the Springtime I sought my Lord
And mated with him beneath the trees and stars
At Beltane I wed my Lord
Beneath the first blossoms of the hawthorn tree
And in the Summertime I ripened the apples in the orchards
And the fruit grew round and strong
At the corn harvest I cut down my Lord
That by his death our people might be fed
And now in the Autumn time
I descend beneath the Earth
To dwell with my Lord in his dark kingdom
Until our child is born
At the Winter Solstice I will bring forth the child
And renew your hope
And at Candlemas I myself will return
To renew the land
I leave you, but I return to you
When you see my power fade
And the leaves fall from the trees
When snow obliterates like death
All trace of me upon the Earth
Then look for me in the Moon
And in the heavens, you will see the soul of me
Soaring still among the stars
And in that darkest time
When the Moon is covered by shadow
And there is no trace of me in Heaven or on Earth
When you look outward and your lives seem cold and dark and barren
Let not despair eat at your hearts.
For when I am hidden
I am but renewing
When I am waning
I am making ready for return
Remember my promise and look within you
And there you will find the spirit of me
Awaiting those who will seek
For by the well-spring of your being
I await you always.
I am Diana in Heaven
And on Earth, Persephone
And within you that dark Hecate
Triple am I
The One in Three
My body the Earth
My soul the Moon
And within thine innermost self
The eternal spirit of me.

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Deity of the Day for September 19th is Horus

Deity of the Day

 Horus

The falcon-headed Sky God

Horus is the god of the sky, and the son of Osiris, the creator (whose own birth was thought due to the Ogdoad). Horus became depicted as a falcon, or as a falcon-headed man, leading to Horus’ name, (in Egyptian, Heru), which meant The distant one.

Horus was sometimes known as Nekheny (meaning falcon), although it has been proposed that Nekheny may have been another falcon-god, worshipped at Nekhen (city of the hawk), that became identified as Horus very early on. In this form, he was sometimes given the title Kemwer, meaning (the) great black (one), referring to the bird’s color.

Horus Identities

- Mekhenti-irry (He who has on his brow Two Eyes) – the sun and moon representing his eyes, on nights when there is no moon. In this form he was considered the god of the blind.

- Haroeris (Horus the Elder) An early form of Horus – God of light. His eyes represented the sun and moon. He was the brother of Osiris and Seth. Sometimes he was the son, or the husband of Hathor.

- Horus Behudety In the form of Horus of Edfu, he represented the midday sun. This Horus was worshipped in the western Delta and later, as his cult spread south into Upper Egypt, a cult center was established in Edfu. Horus of Edfu fights a great battle against Seth and an army of conspirators. He is pictured as a winged sun-disk or as a hawk headed lion.

- Ra-Harakhte (Horus of the two horizons) – He was identified with Ra and the daily voyage of the sun from horizon to horizon. The two deities combined to become Ra-Harakhte. He was represented as a falcon or a falcon-headed man wearing the solar disk and double crown or the uraeus and the atef crown.

- Harmakhet (Horus in the Horizon) In this form he represented the rising sun and was associated with Khepri. He was also considered to be the keeper of wisdom. He was sometimes pictured as a man with a falcon’s head, or a falcon headed lion. But his most recognizable form is that of a sphinx, or as a ram-headed sphinx.

- Harsiesis (Horus son of Isis) This Horus was the son of Isis and Osiris. He was conceived magically after the death of Osiris and brought up by Isis on a floating island in the marshes of Buto. The child was weak and in constant danger from the scheming of his wicked uncle Seth, who sent serpents andmonsters to attack him. But his mother, Isis was great in themagical arts and she warded off this evil by using a spellagainst creatures biting with their mouths and stinging withtheir tails, and the young Horus survived and grew.

- Harendotes (Horus the avenger of his father)

- Har-pa-Neb-Taui (Horus Lord of the Two Lands)

- Harpokrates (The infant Horus) As a child he represented the new born sun and was often pictured being suckled by Isis. he was usually represented as a seated child, sucking his thumb, his head was shaved except for the sidelock of youth. Even as a child, he wore the royal crown and uraeus

As Horus was the son of Osiris, and god of the sky, he became closely associated with the Pharaoh of Upper Egypt (where Horus was worshipped), and became their patron. The association with the Pharaoh brought with it the idea that he was the son of Isis, in her original form, who was regarded as a deification of the Queen.

It was said that after the world was created, Horus landed on a perch, known as the djeba, which literally translates as finger, in order to rest, which consequently became considered sacred. On some occasions, Horus was referred to as lord of the djeba (i.e. lord of the perch or lord of the finger), a form in which he was especially worshipped at Buto, known as Djebauti, meaning (ones) of the djeba (the reason for the plural is not understood, and may just have been a result of Epenthesis, or Paragoge). The form of Djebauti eventually became depicted as an heron, nevertheless continuing to rest on the sacred perch.

Just as a precaution: a great deal of the following information is incorrect. For example, Isis has always been Horus’ mother and never his wife. Osiris has always been Horus’ father and Horus is not both Horus and Osiris. The relation between the story of Jesus and the story of Horus is the fact that Horus’ story is the story of the REAL first immaculate conception.

The story goes as follows: Seth (brother of Osiris) was jealous of Osiris and fought him to the death. After he killed Osiris he cut his body up into 14 pieces and spread the pieces throughout Egypt. Isis (Osiris’ wife) found out that her husband was killed and she searched egypt looking for his body parts. She found all but one (his penis) and using her magic she put his body together and buried him, during the process of putting him back together she became impregnated with her son Horus. She gave birth to Horus who became the god of the sky and later avenged his fathers death by killing his uncle Seth.

Horus as Sun God

Since Horus was said to be the sky, it was natural that he was rapidly considered to also contain the sun and moon. It became said that the sun was one of his eyes and the moon the other, and that they traversed the sky when he, a falcon, flew across it. Thus he became known as Harmerty – Horus of two eyes.

Later, the reason that the moon was not as bright as the sun was explained by a tale, known as the contestings of Horus and Set, originating as a metaphor for the conquest of Lower Egypt by Upper Egypt in about 3000BC. In this tale, it was said that Set, the patron of Lower Egypt, and Horus, the patron of Upper Egypt, had battled for Egypt brutally, with neither side victorious, until eventually the gods sided with Horus.

As Horus was the ultimate victor he became known as Harsiesis (Heru-ur, and Har-Wer, in Egyptian), meaning Horus the Great, but more usually translated as Horus the Elder. Meanwhile, in the struggle, Set had lost a testicle, explaining why the desert, which Set represented is infertile.

Horus’ right eye had also been gouged out, which explained why the moon, which it represented, was so weak compared to the sun. It was also said that during a new-moon, Horus had become blinded and was titled Mekhenty-er-irty (he who has no eyes), while when the moon became visible again, he was re-titled Khenty-irty (he who has eyes).

While blind, it was considered that Horus was quite dangerous, sometimes attacking his friends after mistaking them for enemies.

Ultimately, as another sun god, Horus became identified with Ra as Ra-Herakhty, literally Ra, who is Horus of the two horizons. However, this identification proved to be awkward, for it made Ra the son of Hathor, and therefore a created being rather than the creator.

And, even worse, it made Ra into Horus, who was the son of Ra, i.e. it made Ra his own son and father, in a standard sexually-reproductive manner, an idea that would not be considered comprehensible until the hellenic era. Consequently Ra and Horus never completely merged into a single falcon-headed sun god.

Nevertheless the idea of making the identification persisted, and Ra continued to be depicted as falcon-headed. Likewise, as Ra-Herakhty, in an allusion to the Ogdoad creation myth, Horus was occasionally shown in art as a naked boy, with a finger in his mouth, sitting on a lotus with his mother.

In the form of a youth, Horus was referred to as Neferhor (also spelt Nefer Hor, Nephoros, and Nopheros), which, in the Egyptian language, means beautiful Horus (i.e. youthful Horus).In an attempt to resolve the conflict, Ra-Herakhty was occasionally said to be married to Iusaaset, which was technically his own shadow, having previously been Atum’s shadow, before Atum was identified as Ra, in the form Atum-Ra, and thus of Ra-Herakhty when Ra was also identified as a form of Horus.

In the version of the Ogdoad creation myth used by the Thoth cult, Thoth created Ra-Herakhty, via an egg, and so was said to be the father of Neferhor.

Mystery Religion

Since Horus, as the son of Osiris, was only in existence after Osiris’s death, and because Horus, in his earlier guise, was the husband of Isis, the difference between Horus and Osiris blurred, and so, after a few centuries, it came to be said that Horus was the resurrected form of Osiris. Likewise, as the form of Horus before his death and resurrection, Osiris, who had already become considered a form of creator when belief about Osiris assimilated that about Ptah-Seker, also became considered to be the only creator, since Horus had gained these aspects of Ra.

Eventually, in the Hellenic period, Horus was, in some locations, identified completely as Osiris, and became his own father, since this concept was not so disturbing to Greek philosophy as it had been to that of ancient Egypt.

In this form, Horus was sometimes known as Heru-sema-tawy, meaning Horus, uniter of two lands, since Horus ruled over the land of the dead, and that of the living. Since the tale became one of Horus’ own death and rebirth, which happened partly due to his own actions, he became a life-death-rebirth deity.

In the time of Christ the term “son of god” had come to mean the bearer of this title was the father god himself as well as his own son incarnated on earth. Horus was Osiris the father who incarnated as Horus the son.By assimilating Hathor, who had herself assimilated Bata, who was associated with music, and in particular the sistrum, Isis was likewise thought of in some areas in the same manner.

This particularly happened amongst the groups who thought of Horus as his own father, and so Horus, in the form of the son, amongst these groups often became known as Ihy (alternately: Ihi, Ehi, Ahi, Ihu), meaning sistrum player, which allowed the confusion between the father and son to be side-stepped.

The combination of this, now rather esoteric mythology, with the philosophy of Plato, which was becoming popular on the mediterranean shores, lead to the tale becoming the basis of a mystery religion.

Many Greeks, and those of other nations, who encountered the faith, thought it so profound that they sought to create their own, modelled upon it, but using their own gods. This lead to the creation of what was effectively one religion, which was, in many places, adjusted to superficially reflect the local mythology although it substantially adjusted them.

The religion is known to modern scholars as that of Osiris-Dionysus.

 

Source:
Crystalinks

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Deity of the Day for September 18th is Dionysus

Deity of the Day

Dionysus

 

He was the god of fertility and wine, later considered a patron of the arts. He invented wine and spread the art of tending grapes. He has a dual nature. On the one hand bringing joy and divine ecstasy. On the other brutal, unthinking, rage. Thus, reflecting both sides of wines nature. If he choses Dionysus can drive a man mad. No normal fetters can hold him or his followers.

Dionysus is the son of Zeus and Semele. He is the only god to have a mortal parent. Zeus came to Semele in the night, invisible, felt only as a divine presence. Semele was pleased to be a lover of a god, even though she did not know which one. Word soon got around and Hera quickly assumed who was responsible. Hera went to Semele in disguise and convinced her she should see her lover as he really was. When Zeus next came to her she made him promise to grant her one wish. She went so far as to make him swear on the River Styx that he would grant her request. Zeus was madly in love and agreed. She then asked him to show her his true form. Zeus, was unhappy, and knew what would happen but, having sworn he had no choice. He appeared in his true form and Semele was instantly burnt to a crisp by the sight of his glory. Zeus did manage to rescue Dionysus and stitched him into his thigh to hold him until he was ready to be born. His birth from Zeus alone conferred immortality upon him.

Dionysus problems with Hera were not yet over. She was still jealous and arranged for the Titans to kill him. The Titans ripped him into to pieces. However, Rhea brought him back to life. After this Zeus arranged for his protection and turned him over the mountain nymphs to be raised.

Dionysus wandered the world actively encouraging his cult. He was accompanied by the Maenads, wild women, flush with wine, shoulders draped with a fawn skin, carrying rods tipped with pine cones. While other gods had templaces the followers of Dionysus worshipped him in the woods. Here they might go into mad states where they would rip apart and eat raw any animal they came upon.

Dionysus is also one of the very few that was able to bring a dead person out of the underworld. Even though he had never seen Semele he was concerned for her. Eventually he journeyed into the underworld to find her. He faced down Thanatos and brought her back to Mount Olympus.

Dionysus became one of the most important gods in everyday life. He became associated with several key concepts. One was rebirth after death. Here his dismemberment by the Titans and return to life is symbolically echoed in tending vines, where the vines must be pruned back sharply, and then become dormant in winter for them to bear fruit. The other is the idea that under the influence of wine, one could feel possessed by a greater power. Unlike the other gods Dionysus was not only outside his believers but, also within them. At these times a man might be greater than himself and do works he otherwise could not.

The festival for Dionysus is in the spring when the leaves begin to reappear on the vine. It became one of the most important events of the year. It’s focus became the theater. Most of the great greek plays were initially written to be performed at the feast of Dionysus. All who took part writers, actors, spectators were regarded as sacred servants of Dionysus during the festival.

 

Source:
Greek Mythology.com

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The Temple & Festival of Bastet

The Temple & Festival of Bastet

Temple

Herodotus, a Greek historian who travelled in Egypt in the 5th century BC, describes Bastet’s temple at some length:

“save for the entrance, it stands on an island; two separate channels approach it from the Nile, and after coming up to the entry of the temple, they run round it on opposite sides; each of them is an hundred feet wide, and overshadowed by trees. The temple is in the midst of the city, the whole circuit of which commands a view down into it; for the city’s level has been raised, but that of the temple has been left as it was from the first, so that it can be seen into from without. A stone wall, carven with figures, runs round it; within is a grove of very tall trees growing round a great shrine, wherein is the image of the goddess; the temple is a square, each side measuring a furlong. A road, paved with stone, of about three furlongs’ length leads to the entrance, running eastward through the market place, towards the temple of Hermes; this road is about four hundred wide, and bordered by trees reaching to heaven.”

The description offered by Herodotus and several Egyptian texts suggest that water surrounded the temple on three (out of four) sides, forming a type of lake known as isheru, not too dissimilar from that surrounding the Temple of the goddess Mut in Karnak at Thebes. Lakes known as isheru were typical of temples devoted to a number of leonine goddesses who are said to represent one original goddess, daughter of the Sun-God Re / Eye of Re: Bastet, Mut, Tefnut, Hathor and Sakhmet. Each of them had to be appeased by a specific set of rituals. One myth relates that a lioness, fiery and wrathful, was once cooled down by the water of the lake, transformed into a gentle cat and settled in the temple.

Festival

Herodotus also relates that of the many solemn festivals held in Egypt, the most important and most popular one was that celebrated in Bubastis in honour of the goddess, whom he calls Bubastis and equates with the Greek goddess Artemis.  Each year on the day of her festival, the town is said to have attracted some 700,000 visitors (“as the people of the place say”), both men and women (but not children), who arrived in numerous crowded ships. The women engaged in music, song and dance on their way to the place, great sacrifices were made and prodigious amounts of wine were drunk, more than was the case throughout the year.[ This accords well with Egyptian sources which prescribe that leonine goddesses are to be appeased with the “feasts of drunkenness”.

The goddess Bast was sometimes depicted holding a ceremonial sistrum in one hand and an aegis in the other—the aegis usually resembling a collar or gorget embellished with a lioness head.

Bast was a goddess of the sun throughout most of Ancient Egyptian history, but later when she was changed into a cat goddess rather than a lioness, she was changed to a goddess of the moon by Greeks occupying Ancient Egypt toward the end of its civilization. In Greek mythology, Bast also is known as Ailuros.

Source:
Nefertiti Wiki

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Bast, Goddess of Protection and Pleasure

Bast, Goddess of Protection and Pleasure

 

Bast, Egyptian goddess of sensual pleasure, protector of the household, bringer of health, and the guardian saint of firefighters — she was the original mistress of multi-tasking!

Also called Bastet or Basthet, the goddess Bast is widely known today as the “Cat Goddess”. Legend has it that, by day, Bast would ride through the sky with her father, the sun god Ra, his boat pulling the sun through the sky.

Ever watchful, she protected Ra from his enemies. Thus she became known as the Lady of the East, the Goddess of the Rising Sun, and  The Sacred and All-Seeing Eye.

But by night, she was a different creature entirely! Bast transformed herself into a cat (renown for its superb night vision) to guard her father from Apep (also known as Apophis), a serpent who was her father’s greatest enemy.

Ra’s priests burned wax models of the snake and wrote his name with green ink, trying to put a “hex” on him — but to no avail. Finally, with her cat eyes shining in the dark, she managed to kill the evil serpent.

Credited with killing the vile Apep, the goddess Bast ensured the warmth of the sun would continue to bless the delta of the Nile with fertile soil and abundant crops and was honored as a goddess of fertility.

Because of her all-seeing sacred eye (called the utchat) that magically saw through the dark, Bast is one of the few sun goddesses that is also classified as a moon goddess…with her glowing cat’s eye reminding us of the moon that it reflects.


One of the most ancient of the Egyptian goddesses, she is depicted as a slender woman having the head of a domestic cat. Sometimes she is shown holding a sistrum, a rattle used as a musical instrument in ancient times. Agile and lithe, Bast was recognized as the goddess of music and dance.

The worship of Bast began around 3,500 B.C.E., before the invention of writing.  In 950 B.C.E. it became the ‘national religion’ when her hometown, Baubastis, became the capitol of Egypt.

Her shrine in Baubastis, fashioned from blocks of pink granite and the lengthy entrance lined with enormous trees, was considered to be one of the most beautiful temples in the world.

The grounds of the templeheld an extensive cat cemetery, where her beloved companions after being mummified, were entombed so they could join Bast in the spirit world.

Cats were honored in the temples of Bast and many felines were in permanent residence there. If a local house caught on fire, the cats would be dispatched to run into the flames, drawing them out of the building. (History’s first record of a fire brigade!)

Undoubtedly many returned to the temple a bit singed, but as heroes of the townspeople. Any unfortunate kitty who perished in the undertaking would be restored to life by the goddess Bast.  This is possibly the source of the belief that cats have nine lives


Consistent with her cat-like image and her status as a fertility goddess, Bast was associated with childbirth, perhaps because of the mother cat’s continuous production of litters and the loving way she fiercely defends and cares for her kittens.

As a gentler, more benevolent, evolution of the lion-headed goddess Sekhmet, her violent and bloody sister who could bring plagues, the goddess Bast could be invoked to prevent the spread of illness.

Most households contained a small statue of Bast as a form of household protection . . .  The All-Seeing Eye, to ward off thieves. . . as the Cat Goddess, to keep the house free of snakes. . . and as the healer to ward off infectious diseases.

An amulet with the utchat (all-seeing eye) hung over the door deterred thieves and vandals, placed over the mantel it averted illness, worn around the neck it protected you as you traveled. An amulet featuring a mother cat with several kittens suckling or playing at her feet was often given as a wedding present to a bride, invoking the help of the goddess to insure that a woman would be able to conceive and bear children

Bast, more than any other of the Egyptian goddesses was perceived as a protector and friend of women and young children. It is hardly surprising that the ancient Greeks referred to Bast as “The Egyptian Artemis”.

Does this goddess sound like a gal that the phrase “sex kitten” would be invented for? Hardly!  But, of course, there is more to the story than we’ve told so far; we saved the juicy parts for last.

For starters, one of the oldest versions of the goddess Bast was known by the name ‘Pasht’, from which our word passion was derived. (And from which the English term “Puss” may have arisen.)

Her name itself shares the hieroglyph of a bas-jar, a large pottery jar, usually filled with expensive perfume, a valuable commodity in a hot climate. Indeed, her son Nefertem, a sun god, became the Egyptian god of alchemy and perfumes.

It’s not surprising she had a reputation, since she herself had three husbands and was acknowledged as a sexual partner of every god and goddess (explaining her association with lesbians, although bisexuality would be a more accurate description of her nature).

The rituals performed in her temples, designed for healing, protection, and insuring fertility, were decidedly sensual, full of music and dancing The priestesses of Bast, dressed in “her color” which was red, and were the first “strippers”, famous for their erotic dancing.

Many festivals were held in her honor, and they tended to be quite rowdy affairs. During the major festival, thousands of men and women (children weren’t invited) traveled on barges down the river to Baubastis, drinking and partying mightily.

With loud music, women shaking their rattles, others gyrating in dance, and some lifting their skirts while making lewd comments to the townspeople lined up on the riverbank to watch the procession, the feasts of Bast may have been a precursor to the Mardi Gras and Carnivale. Some think that it is even the basis for the word “floats” that describe the decorated rides in a parade.

The Egyptian goddess Bast reminds us of all that is feline and feminine.  Her gifts, very cat-like in nature, include the refusal to be at everyone’s beck and call and an insistence on the freedom of expression.

She teaches us to relax and never waste energy, reminding us to luxuriate in beauty, perfume, and to sway in graceful movement. Bast refuses to take anything too seriously.

But most importantly, Bast leads us to accept the true nature of things (ourselves included) and helps us remain unswayed by the opinion of others. 

Curled up like a cat lying in the sun, the goddess Bast foms a complete circle . . . a symbol of the eternal.

Source:

Goddess Gifts

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Spells Associated With Bast

Spells Associated With Bast

Holy Water

Get a bowl of water and something to store it in when you are finished blessing it. Put your hands over the bowl of water and say:
 “Holy Bastet, I cleanse this water of all negativity in this world and in the astral. I consecrate and regenerate this water in the name of Bastet.”
Then hold you hands over the water and imagine a white (Color of purity) or green (Bastet’s color) light flowing from your hands into the water. Then say:
“In the names of Bastet I ask for the blessings of love, harmony, and peace upon this water. Amen.”

A Quartz and Candle Spell

Get a candle of the appropriate color according to your intentions. Use the above list.
With the tip of a cleansed, terminated quarts crystal, scratch a symbol of your need onto the candle. The symbol could be a heart for love, a dollar sign for money, a fist for strength, etc. Alternately, use a type of rune or a word made of hieroglyphics. Or you can just write your need on the candle with the crystal. As you scratch or draw, visualize your need with crystal clarity as if it has already manifested. Place the candle in its holder. Set the crystal near it and light the candle. As the flame shines, again, strongly visualize your need. The crystal, candle, and symbol will do their work. As you work on this spell, ask Bastet to help you.

Cat Healing Ritual

Items Needed:
-A statue of Bastet
-A white (Or green, if you prefer) candle to be lit in Her honor
-A blue candle to be charged
-A photo of the ill cat to be placed on the altar
-A charm bag filled with the appropriate herbs/stones and some of the cat’s hair
-A separate bit of the cat’s fur to burn to send it’s “scent” up to Bastet
-Incense to be offered to Bastet

Ritual:
Light the white candle, which should shed its light on the statue of Bastet. Say:
Stars fade like memory the instant before the dawn.
Low in the east the sun appears, golden as an opening eye.
That which can be named must exist.
That which is named can be written.
That which is written shall be remembered.
That which is remembered lives…
The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead
Bastet! Ubastyat! Thee whose name has been written and remembered for five thousand years, Thee whose praise has never faded, we call Thee down the corridors of time to be with us now.

Offer Incense, then say:
Hear our petition, O Divine Feline!
Lady of the East, we call upon Thee!
Patron of music, we call upon Thee!
Patron of dance, we call upon Thee!
Patron of motherhood, we call upon Thee!
And especially as patron of cats, we call upon Thee!

Offer incense, then say:
Accept this offering of flowers and mint, of roses and catnip,
Thou who hast been both solar and lunar Goddess,
Thou who walk in beauty and in terror, protective and fierce.
Let its scent please Thee, and look upon us with favor.
Hail, Bastet – Hail and Welcome!

Lady, we come before Thee with the petition of (Petitioner’s Name), who has approached us for aid.
Her beloved pet, Thy child, whom she calls
(Cat’s Name), is in need of healing.
See the aspect of Thy child, Bastet, and breathe his scent.

Place some fur on a charcoal, then say:
Protect him as a mother would, O Bastet, and let him be healed quickly and cleanly, with little pain and without further trouble.
Or, if it be his time to die, let his passing be swift and merciful.
This amulet and this candle we entreat Thee to bless, to protect and strengthen him.
We offer Thee praise, O Bastet – hear our music and song!

Offer incense, then sing and dance:
Hail to Thee, O Jewel of the Night!
Hail to Thee, O Divine Feline!
Hail to Thee, O Jewel of the Night!
Hail to Thee, O Lady of the East!
Hail to Thee, O Jewel of the Night!
Hail to Thee, Ubastyat! Protector!

(Repeat until energy is raised and grounded into the amulet and candle.)

To Thee be all honor, O Bastet!

Offer remaining incense, then say:
Let the sweet smoke of our offering attend Thee on Thy way!
We thank Thee for Thy blessing and Thine aid,
And as Thou depart, most gracious Lady,
We bid Thee Hail – Hail and Farewell!

Extinguish the candle lit in Bastet’s honor.

Bastet Blessing and Protection Ritual

This is a blessing ritual for yourself and your cats. First, take your sistrum (Or bell) and go around the ritual area shaking it. Begin in the East and go clockwise while saying:
Joy comes from Bastet, the Lady of cats
The Goddess loves and protects all animals
As a daughter/son of Bastet, I call upon her
To pour out her blessings.

Return to the altar and shake the sistrum/bell and say:
Hail Bastet, the Lady of cats
Hail Goddess of earthly delights
Teach me to rejoice in the being that I am
Teach me to love and to be happy.

If you have pictures of your cats, look at them now with love and happiness. If you don’t have pictures, call up their images mentally. Call each cat by name as if presenting him/her to the Goddess. Be alert to the atmosphere around you, for you will very likely experience the presence of Bastet in some manner. When you have finished, take the sistrum/bell and go to the East, shake it five times and say:
The ears of Bastet as sensitive to every word of harm sent against me and my pets.
My cats and I are protected.

Go South and shake the sistrum/bell five times and say:
The claws of Bastet are sharp in my defense.
My cats and I are protected.

Go West and shake the sistrum/bell five times and say:
The teeth of Bastet are bared to evil doers.
My cats and I are protected.

Go North and shake the sistrum/bell five times and say:
The eyes of Bastet can see through darkness, nothing escapes her notice.
My cats and I are protected.


Return to the altar and shake the sistrum/bell three times and say:
Listen well, all those who would harm me and mine.
Here is erected a mighty fortress, an unbreakable shield.
You cannot enter here. Your evil thoughts return to you.
The gate is locked against you.

Visualize a green light filling the room, caressing you and the picture or mental images of your cats. Say:
Lovely Cat-Goddess, I thank you for your blessings.
Keep us in safety, good health and happiness.
Protect my little ones wherever they may roam.

Blow a kiss to Bastet. Extinguish any candles you may have had going during the ritual. As a special treat, both to Bastet and to your cats, present your pets with a catnip toy to play with.

Source:
Temple of Bastet

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Miscellaneous Spells, The Goddesses | Leave a comment

Dedication Ceremony To Bast

Info Before You Dedicate Yourself

If you KNOW that Bastet IS the true, almighty goddess with no doubt, and you have studied her and her religion for at least a year and a day, and you unconditionally love Her, then you have the right to dedicate your soul to her. Please note though, Bastet will not accept people if all they want to do is USE her. Just remember that! You may want to wait until the New Moon because it’s a time of new beginnings. Or you might like to do it on the Full Moon for there is more power in the moon. It’s up to you anyway. You should perform this ritual sky clad (naked) if possible.  Also, you should take a bath before the ritual out of respect. Whatever you do, do it with love! Before you start, ask Bastet to put her essence into the statue on your altar. and when you’re done, she is welcome to leave. You can use the invocation I used in the basic prayer to Her on the shrine page. Praise Bastet!

Dedication Ceremony To Bast

You will need:
     -Oil (Any sweet fragrance); or You Can Use Holy Water
-Half a Teaspoon of Salt
-A Green Candle (NEVER leave candles unattended!)

Ritual:

1. Begin by grounding yourself. Get yourself calm and relaxed. Shut off all the things from your mundane life that distract you-Bills, etc. Only focus on yourself, Bastet,  and the tranquility your entitled to.
2. When you’re ready to proceed, sprinkle the salt on the floor/ground and stand on it. Light your green candle and feel the warmth of its flame. Look at the candle’s flame and think about what goals you have for yourself on your spiritual journey. Think about your motives for this dedication.
3. Stand before your altar and invoke Bastet. Then say:
I am a child of Bastet, and I ask her to bless me.”
Dip your finger into the oil and, with your eyes closed, anoint your forehead and say:
May my mind be blessed, so I may accept the wisdom of Bastet.”
Anoint your eyelids (Be careful) and say:
May my eyes be blessed, so I can clearly see my way upon this path.”
Anoint the tip of your nose and say:
May my nose be blessed, so I may breathe in the essence of the Divine.”
Anoint your lips and say:
May my lips be blessed, so I may always speak with honor and respect.”
Anoint your chest and say:
May my heart be blessed, so I may love and be loved.”
Anoint the tops of your hands and say:
May my hands be blessed, so I may use them to help and heal others.”
Anoint your genital area and say:
May my genitals be blessed, so I may honor the creation of life.”
Anoint the soles of your feet and say:
May my feet be blessed, so I may walk side-by-side with the Divine Cat.”
Now say the following saying that you pledge your loyalty to the Great Cat:
Tonight, I pledge my loyalty to Bastet. I will walk with Her beside me and ask her to guide me on this journey.
I pledge to honor Her, and ask that she allows me to grow closer to Her. As I shall, so mote it be
!”
Now is the time for meditation. Now that you are a Bastist, honor Bastet in everything you do. Praise Bastet!
4. When you are done, you may celebrate with a small feast for you and your cat(s). Leave an offering for Bastet at Her altar or shrine.
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Goddesses | Tags: | Leave a comment

Meeting the Goddess Bast Guided Meditation

Meeting the Goddess Bast Guided Meditation

For the meeting with Bast you will need a table or shelf to use as an altar. On this place an image of the goddess. It doesn’t have to be a statue of Bast, a picture of a cat or suitable cat ornament will do for now. On either side of this place two candles, preferably purple, blue or silver. A vase of blue, purple or white flowers would be appropriate as would some kind of incense and holder. You will also need a small candle in a colour which you feel best represents you. This should be placed in front of your representation of the goddess. Some perfumed oil with which to anoint your personal candle is also needed. Bast likes flowery perfumes for oil and incense if possible.

Traditionally Bast is seen as a gentle goddess. She enjoys music, dancing and perfume. She is Goddess of love and joy and dancing. She is the gentle, nurturing warmth of the sun and the cat who can be picked up and stroked. However, we have to remember that, just like a cat, she does have a fiercer side to her nature as well.

The Meditation

Light the altar candles and the incense.

Close your eyes and breathe deeply for a few minutes.

When you are totally relaxed, open your eyes, and light your small candle. Now, close your eyes once more, clear your mind and see only a black void before your inner eye. Imagine that blackness turning into fog, which swirls around you. Gradually, the fog dissipates.

As the fog clears, a scene is revealed before you of a desert landscape of reddish sand. Nearby, you see the mighty pylon of a temple.

Walk towards the temple. Feel the heat of the sand beneath your feet, and the hot sun on your body. How are you dressed in this world? Take note of your surroundings. Use your inner eye to look around. What can you see? Although you are being led in this visualisation, there is still plenty of space for you to add detail. No two people would ever see exactly the same imagery. Begin to build up your inner world. Make it real in your mind.

Now, walk to the pylon and take a few moments to examine the walls rearing above you. Do they have carvings on them, or are they unadorned? Take a deep breath and smell the air. Incense smoke is drifting out from the temple; its heady aroma fills your nose. You can hear faint music; the bleat of pipes and the low beating of drums. Enter beneath the shade of the pylon gate, cross a courtyard, and find yourself in a vast chamber of stone columns. It is quite dark, but on the floor there are bowls of burning oil that emit a flickering light. Here, the air is cooler and refreshing, and the smell of incense is complemented by a strong fragrance of exotic flowers. Perhaps there are people here – priests and priestesses – or perhaps you are alone. Again, spend a few moments looking round. Go to touch one of the columns; feel the rough texture of the stone beneath your fingers. As you look round, add your own details to the scene. Make it come alive for you.

Now, you walk across the hall of columns and pass through a door-way. You find you have entered a small shrine. Against one wall is a large black basalt statue of a seated cat, the sacred cat of Bast. The statue has golden earrings and a collar of faience. Bowls of incense smoulder before her and she is flanked by flickering flames. You see priests and priestesses are in the shrine. They are surrounded by cats, some sitting on the floor, some lying in niches in the walls. The air is full of the music of the cats; their purrs and cries. Pause to pay respect to the sacred cat of Bast. You can talk to the priests and priestesses if you like. They may have something to tell you, or a gift to impart. Stroke the cats around you.

After a few minutes, say farewell to the priests and priestesses and leave the shrine by another doorway. You find yourself in a corridor with painted walls. Again, it is quite dark, but you can see where you are going by the dim lamp-light glimmering on the floor.

Presently, the corridor opens out into a vast room, lined by columns. Ahead of you, at the other end of the chamber, you see a flight of golden steps that leads up to a life-size golden statue of the goddess. She is a cat-headed woman, carrying a sistrum, surrounded by kittens in gold. She wears a long sheath dress and a necklace around her throat, but her feet are bare. The steps are covered in cats, sleeping, grooming, playing. The room is full of soft, but lively music, played by priestesses on flutes and drums and rattles. Other priests and priestesses dance sinuously to the music, like cats themselves. The floor is covered in petals and as you walk upon them, they release their rich fragrance.

Approach the foot of the stairs and gaze up at the goddess. Visualise that gradually, the statue comes alive. The eyes become living eyes, and slowly, the rigid gold turns to furry skin. See the goddess descend the stairs towards you, her eyes full of benevolence and peace.

 

While this is happening, cast your inner eye back to the room where your statue of the goddess stands before the anointed candle. Imagine that the light of this candle shines into the statue, which is an extension of the senses of Bast in the temple. Through the light of this candle, Bast can see your soul, and recognise you.

Now, spend some time speaking with the goddess. She is a friend to you. She may show you things, give you a symbolic gift or simply offer affection. She may have words of advice for your work to come, or ask you to do something for her in the real world. Let your mind wander freely.

After a few minutes, bow to the goddess, thank her for this audience, and say farewell. See her begin to retreat up the stairs. When she reaches the top she assumes her normal position and turns back into a sleeping statue of gold.

Now, walk back through the temple, bidding farewell to the priests and priestesses, and all the cats. Go out into the desert.

Imagine you are walking into a fog, which gradually turns into a black void. After a moment, the fog begins to clear once more and you are back in your own reality. Open your eyes when you are ready.

Bast Incense Recipe

by Eloise Coquio

With this incense I decided to incorporate both solar and lunar influences to reflect Bast’s dual attributes as both a sun and moon goddess. I was influenced also by her love of perfume and her various magical focuses such as love, happiness and fertility.

3 parts Frankincense

2 parts Gum Arabic

1 part Myrrh

1 part Catnip

1 part patchouli leaf

1 part Rose petal

1 part sandalwood.(Red or white)

1/2 part lavender

1/2 part Orris Root

2 drops each of Ylang Ylang and Carnation oil

 

Many thanks to Storm Constantine and Lady of the Flame Iseum for this meditation. If you wish to quote from or reproduce it on your website, please give credit: Copyright (C) 2000 Lady of the Flame Iseum

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Meditation, The Goddesses | Tags: | Leave a comment

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