Deities

Deity of the Day for Aug. 20th – Idunn The Norse Goddess

Deity of the Day

Idunn

The Norse Goddess

 

Areas of Influence: Idunn is the Norse Goddess of youth and springtime.

Her name means she who renews and has several alternative spellings including: Indun, Iduna and Idhunna.

She was one of the lesser known Aesir Goddesses who lived in Asgard.

She is the keeper of the magical apples that give the Gods immortality.

When Loki arranges for the giant Thiassi to abduct her all the Gods and Goddesses start to age and weaken.

Loki is summoned by the angry Gods and is told to rescue her. He borrows Freya’s falcon cloak and flies to the giants house. Luckily the Giant is out fishing so Loki transforms Idun into a nut, attempting to fly her home quickly before the giant discovers her missing.

The Giant returns home early and changes into an eagleso he can give chase. The Eagle is faster than a falcon and the giant begins to gain on Loki. Odin sees them in the distance and instructs the Gods to light a fire once Loki has safely flown overhead. The Eagle is unable to stop and his wings burst into flames.

Origins and Genealogy: She is married to Bragi the God of poetry. I have not included her parentage as the information is incomplete and contradictory.

Strengths: Generous and youthful.

Weaknesses: Naivety, too trusting.

Symbolism: Shown as a beautiful maiden.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples which she carries in a basket.

Idunn’s Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden Archetype represents purity and the innocence of childhood, where the soul’s dreams, magic and make believe still prevail.

It is also an aspect of the Triple Goddess, together with the Mother and the Crone they represents the cycles of the moon and the different stages of a woman’s life.

Shadow Maiden is very self centered all, her dreams and energy is expended on achieving her own personal needs and goals.

Idunn is a Maiden Goddess as she is the Goddess of youth and the springtime.

How To Work With This Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden is one of your Archetypes if you are life still in touch with your childhood intuition and fantasies and have used these to fulfill your dreams. Hence you can still have the Maiden Archetype at any time of life.

The Maiden reminds you to look after the magical child that lies within us all.

Shadow Maiden asks you to look at whether your dreams and aspirations are selfish and take no account of the needs of others.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for August 18th is Osiris, Egyptian God of the Underworld

Deity of the Day

 Osiris

Egyptian God of the Underworld

 

Here are the facts about Osiris, the Ancient Egyptian God.

  • Osiris is associated with the dead. He is often called the god of the afterlife and the ruler of the underworld.
  • He was the son of the Ged (the Earth God) and Nut (the Sky Goddess). His sister and wife was the goddess Isis.
  • In many of the Ancient Egyptian myths, Isis and Osiris are the parents of Horus.
  • According to one of the myths, Set killed Osiris by tricking him into getting into a box. Set sealed the box and threw it into the River Nile. Isis, the wife of Osiris, found Osiris’ body and used her magic to bring it back to life. Isis became pregnant with Horus and Osiris died once more. Isis buried Osiris in the desert. Set discovered the body of Osiris and was so angry that he tore the body into several pieces, scattering them throughout Egypt. Isis painstakingly collected all of the body parts and reassembled them for burial. The gods were impressed by the actions of Isis and brought Osiris back to rule the underworld as the Lord of the Dead.
  • Osiris is usually depicted with as a man with green skin (to represent rebirth and regrowth). His legs are wrapped like an Egyptian mummy and he has a long beard (as worn by the Ancient Egyptian pharaohs). He often wears a crown decorated with ostrich feathers and he holds a crook in one hand and a flail in the other.

 

Source:

Author: James
Website: Primary Facts
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Deity of the Day for August 17th is Aradia the Goddess

Deity of the Day

  Aradia the Goddess

 

The goddess of teachers, the poor, slaves, and witches; she is the daughter of the sun and the moon. Her mother is Dianna (the Greek goddess) and her father is believed to be Lucifer (not the same Lucifer of the Bible), who was cast out of paradise because of his splendor and beauty. She is often times considered the “Mother of Witches” and the “Mother of Italian Witchcraft”.

Aradia was trained by her mother in witchcraft and sent out amongst the Italian pheasants to spread the knowledge of witchcraft. She was sent to teach the Old Religion to these people to help them survive against the rise of the Roman Catholic Church and also to preserve the old ways.

She worked with the poor and helped slaves escape slavery. She was captured many times but always managed to escape, continuing to spread the knowledge of Witchcraft and the teachings of the Old Religion.

Almost all of our information on Aradia the Goddess comes from Charles Leland’s book, Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches. Leland claimed that he received the text from a group of witches in Tuscany who claimed that it was a valid religious text. However, some historians and researchers have disputed this claim.

Aradia di Toscano

For years, Leland’s account of Aradia was all that Pagans and Wiccans had. Recently, prominent Italian witchcraft author Raven Grimassi has written out a different account of Aradia. Grimassi claimed that Leland’s account of Aradia was “off” and that Aradia was actually a real woman by the name of Aradia di Toscano.

Grimassi claimed that Aradia di Toscano was a woman who lived during the 1300’s and helped spread the revival of Italian Witchcraft during the rise of Catholicism. His account of the human Aradia is almost identical to that of Leland’s goddess account. Both Aradia’s lead religious revivals and were known for helping the poor and the slaves out of their hardships.

Symbols Associated with the Goddess Aradia

  • The moon
  • The sun
  • The color yellow
  • The element air
  • Waxing moon cycle
  • Red garter

Pagan Worship of Aradia

Aradia is a very popular patron goddess amongst Wiccans. Despite the fact that there is very little information on the goddess aspect of her, this actually makes her an easier goddess to look up to and revere. This allows you to seek out the goddess herself and inquire from her on how she would like you to connect to her.

One way to connect to her is through the moon. The moon has huge symbolic meaning for the goddess and is a great way to produce a connection with her. Add a symbol of the moon to your altar, or perhaps wear a moon totem piece of jewelry to show your reverence to her.

Air is an element that has great symbolic meaning to the goddess. Taking a walk outside during a windy day, or simply enjoying the breeze from your porch is a great way to connect to her.

Remember to keep your mind and heart open to allow the goddess to communicate with you. Just listen and she will speak to you and show you ways to communicate with her.

Source: HubPages, Religion and Philosophy

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Deity of the Day for August 7th is Apollo, Greek God of the Sun

Deity of the Day

 

 Apollo

Greek God of the Sun

 

Here’s a quick guide to the basic facts about Apollo.

Apollo’s Appearance: A young man with curly golden hair or, sometimes, rays of the sun emanating from his head..

Symbol or Attribute of Apollo: The Sun itself, the lyre (a type of musical instrument), the bow, and the chariot he drives across the sky daily, borrowed from an earlier pre-Greek Sun god, Helios.

Apollo’s Strengths: Creative, handsome, supportive of all the arts of civilization.

Apollo’s Weaknesses: Like his father Zeus, Apollo is all too happy to enjoy the charms of nymphs, as well as the occasional youth, and his conquests number in the dozens.

Birthplace of Apollo: On the sunny Greek island of Delos, where he was born along with his twin sister, Artemis. A palm tree is pointed out as the actual site of the birth. Another tradition gives the islands of Lato, the Letoides, now called Paximadia, off the southern coast of Crete.

Spouse: Apollo had many encounters, but no formal marriages. Flings with Cassandra, to whom he gave the gift of prophecy; Daphne, who fled from his embrace and turned into a laurel tree; Acacallis, a maiden from the Samaria Gorge on the island of Crete who was spurned by her proud family for choosing a “foreign” Greek god, and Calliope, with whom he had a child, Orpheus.

Apollo’s Children: Information varies, but the enchanting semi-divine singer Orpheus and Asklepios, also spelled Asclepius, Aesculapius and other variants, the god of healing, are the most famous of Apollo’s offspring.

Some Major Temple Sites of Apollo: The mountain town of Delphi, where a few columns from an early temple of Apollo still stand. The island of Delos is also sacred to him, but there is no temple remaining there today.

Apollo in some places replaced an earlier solar god, Helios. High mountain tops were sacred to Helios, and today, churches dedicated to Saint Elias are often found on these same spots.

Basic Story: Apollo was the son of the supreme Greek god Zeus and Leto, a nymph. Zeus’s wife Hera was outraged and convinced the earth to refuse to allow Leto to give birth anywhere on its surface. But the island of Delos allowed Leto to take refuge there and give birth to Apollo and his twin sister, Artemis, goddess of the hunt and wild things. The goddess Themis assisted in raising him by feeding him ambrosia, the sacred nectar of the gods.

Interesting Fact: Apollo Delphinus or Delphinius was the dolphin-form of the god and was revered at Delphi – despite its location high in the mountains. He supposedly commandeered a Cretan ship in his dolphin form, jumping out of the water and landing on its deck, and then forced it to the coastline at Delphi; the sailors on the ship supposedly became his first priests at Delphi. He was also believed to have destroyed an evil serpent at Delphi, and took over as the patron god of the famous oracle there. Some ancient coins show the head of Apollo with dolphins swimming in the background.

Some images of Apollo in profile on coins are very beautiful and often can be mistaken for an image of a goddess instead. The inscription may read Ἀπόλλων (Apollon) or Ἀπέλλων, among other variants. If you see the first two letters, it’s almost certainly Apollo.

 

 

Source

Fast Facts on Apollo
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The Goddess Creed

Celtic & British Isles Graphics

The Goddess Creed

I believe in Goddess the Mother All Mighty

Creatrix of the heavens and earth

And in all women

Who were conceived of Her love

Born of our sacred mothers

Suffered under patriarchy

Were crucified, died, and were buried

We descended into the underworld

The third day we arose again

We integrated with our new selves

And we now sit with Goddess our Mother

And we judge no one

I believe in the Holy Mother

The maiden, mother, crone

Forgiveness toward others

The celebration of the body

And everlasting renewal of life

So Mote It Be


(c) 2008 Danu Gray Wolf

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, The Goddesses, Wicca, Witchcraft | Leave a comment

Deity of the Day for July 30th is Nephthys

Deity of the Day

Nephthys

Goddess of Death, Service, Lamentation and Nighttime

Nephthys ((/ˈnɛpθɨs/ or /ˈnɛfθɨs/) or Nebthet/ˈnɛbˌθɛt/ (Arabic: نيفتيس Nyftys) is a member of the Great Ennead of Heliopolis in Egyptian mythology, a daughter of Nut and Geb. Nephthys was typically paired with her sister Isis in funerary rites because of their role as protectors of the mummy and the god Osiris and as the sister-wife of Set.

Nephthys is the Greek form of an epithet (transliterated as Nebet-het, and Nebt-het, from Egyptian hieroglyphs).The origin of the goddess Nephthys is unclear but the literal translation of her name is usually given as “Lady of the House,” which has caused some to mistakenly identify her with the notion of a “housewife,” or as the primary lady who ruled a domestic household. This is a pervasive error repeated in many commentaries concerning this deity. Her name means quite specifically, “Lady of the [Temple] Enclosure” which associates her with the role of priestess.

This title, which may be more of an epithet describing her function than a given name, probably indicates the association of Nephthys with one particular temple or some specific aspect of the Egyptian temple ritual. Along with her sister Isis, Nephthys represented the temple pylon or trapezoidal tower gateway entrance to the temple which also displayed the flagstaff. This entrance way symbolised the horizon or akhet.

At the time of the Fifth Dynasty Pyramid Texts, Nephthys appears as a goddess of the Heliopolitan Ennead. She is the sister of Isis and companion of the war-like deity, Set. As sister of Isis and especially Osiris, Nephthys is a protective goddess who symbolizes the death experience, just as Isis represented the (re-)birth experience.

Nephthys was known in some ancient Egyptian temple theologies and cosmologies as the “Useful Goddess” or the “Excellent Goddess”. These late Ancient Egyptian temple texts describe a goddess who represented divine assistance and protective guardianship.

Nephthys is regarded as the mother of the funerary-deity Anubis (Inpu) in some myths. Alternatively Anubis appears as the son of Bastet or Isis.

As the primary “nursing mother” of the incarnate Pharaonic-god, Horus, Nephthys also was considered to be the nurse of the reigning Pharaoh himself. Though other goddesses could assume this role, Nephthys was most usually portrayed in this function. In contrast Nephthys is sometimes featured as a rather ferocious and dangerous divinity, capable of incinerating the enemies of the Pharaoh with her fiery breath.

New Kingdom Ramesside Pharaohs, in particular, were enamored of Mother Nephthys, as is attested in various stelae and a wealth of inscriptions at Karnak and Luxor, where Nephthys was a member of that great city’s Ennead and her altars were present in the massive complex.

Nephthys was typically paired with her sister Isis in funerary rites because of their role as protectors of the mummy and the god Osiris and as the sister-wife of Seth.

Less well understood than her sister Isis, Nephthys was no less important in Egyptian Religion as confirmed by the work of E. Hornung, along with the work of several noted scholars.

“Ascend and descend; descend with Nephthys, sink into darkness with the Night-bark. Ascend and descend; ascend with Isis, rise with the Day-bark.”

Pyramid Text Utterance 222 line 210.

In the funerary role, Nephthys often was depicted as a kite, or as a woman with falcon wings, usually outstretched as a symbol of protection. Nephthys’s association with the kite or the Egyptian hawk (and its piercing, mournful cries) evidently reminded the ancients of the lamentations usually offered for the dead by wailing women. In this capacity, it is easy to see how Nephthys could be associated with death and putrefaction in the Pyramid Texts. She was, almost without fail, depicted as crowned by the hieroglyphics signifying her name, which were a combination of signs for the sacred temple enclosure (hwt), along with the sign for neb, or mistress (Lady), on top of the enclosure sign

Nephthys was clearly viewed as a morbid-but-crucial force of heavenly transition, i.e., the Pharaoh becomes strong for his journey to the afterlife through the intervention of Isis and Nephthys. The same divine power could be applied later to all of the dead, who were advised to consider Nephthys a necessary companion. According to the Pyramid Texts, Nephthys, along with Isis, was a force before whom demons trembled in fear, and whose magical spells were necessary for navigating the various levels of Duat, as the region of the afterlife was termed.

It should here be noted that Nephthys was not necessarily viewed as the polar opposite of Isis, but rather as a different reflection of the same reality: eternal life in transition. Thus, Nephthys was also seen in the Pyramid Texts as a supportive cosmic force occupying the night-bark on the journey of Ra, the majestic sun god, particularly when he entered Duat at the transitional time of dusk, or twilight. Isis was Ra’s companion at the coming of dawn.

Nephthys plays an important role in the Osirian myth-cycle.

It is Nephthys who assists Isis in gathering and mourning the dismembered portions of the body of Osiris, after his murder by the envious Set. Nephthys also serves as the nursemaid and watchful guardian of the infant Horus. The Pyramid Texts refer to Isis as the “birth-mother” and to Nephthys as the “nursing-mother” of Horus. Nephthys was attested as one of the four “Great Chiefs” ruling in the Osirian cult-center of Busiris, in the Delta and she appears to have occupied an honorary position at the holy city of Abydos. No cult is attested for her there, though she certainly figured as a goddess of great importance in the annual rites conducted, wherein two chosen females or priestesses played the roles of Isis and Nephthys and performed the elaborate ‘Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys’. There, at Abydos, Nephthys joined Isis as a mourner in the shrine known as the Osireion. These “Festival Songs of Isis and Nephthys” were ritual elements of many such Osirian rites in major ancient Egyptian cult-centers.

As a mortuary goddess (along with Isis, Neith, and Serqet), Nephthys was one of the protectresses of the Canopic jars of the Hapi. Hapi, one of the Sons of Horus, guarded the embalmed lungs. Thus we find Nephthys endowed with the epithet, “Nephthys of the Bed of Life,” in direct reference to her regenerative priorities on the embalming table. In the city of Memphis, Nephthys was duly honored with the title “Queen of the Embalmer’s Shop,” and there associated with the jackal-headed god Anubis as patron.

Nephthys was also considered a festive deity whose rites could mandate the liberal consumption of beer. In various reliefs at Edfu, Dendera, and Behbeit, Nephthys is depicted receiving lavish beer-offerings from the Pharaoh, which she would “return”, using her power as a beer-goddess “that [the pharaoh] may have joy with no hangover.” Elsewhere at Edfu, for example, Nephthys is a goddess who gives the Pharaoh power to see “that which is hidden by moonlight.” This fits well with more general textual themes that consider Nephthys to be a goddess whose unique domain was darkness, or the perilous edges of the desert.

Nephthys could also appear as one of the goddesses who assists at childbirth. One ancient Egyptian myth preserved in the Papyrus Westcar recounts the story of Isis, Nephthys, Meskhenet, and Heqet as traveling dancers in disguise, assisting the wife of a priest of Amun-Re as she prepares to bring forth sons who are destined for fame and fortune.

Nephthys’s healing skills and status as direct counterpart of Isis, steeped, as her sister in “words of power,” are evidenced by the abundance of faience amulets carved in her likeness, and by her presence in a variety of magical papyri that sought to summon her famously altruistic qualities to the aid of mortals.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

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Deity of the Day for July 28th is Blodeuwedd

Deity of the Day

 

Blodeuwedd

Blodeuwedd (pronounced Blow-day-yoo-eth) is the Welsh Goddess of Flowers.

Mythology:-
After Lleu’s mother, Arianrhod declared that he would never have a mortal wife, his two magician companions, Gwydion and Math began to work their magick. They formed a magickal, divine wife named Blodeuwedd for him out of 9 flowers. She was expected to of course marry him and be a loyal wife and though he loved her, she never loved him.
For three nights Lleu had left Blodeuwedd in charge of their… home and in that time a nobelman in need of a rest from his huntng activity took shelter there. His name was Gronw the Strong and the two fell in love.
Desperate to be free of her husband and marry her hunter love the two plotted to kill Lleu. After failed attempts Blodeuwedd tricked Lleu into revealing how he could be killed (only when special conditions were met was this possible).
After a year and a day of preparing for the right conditions Gronw made his attack on Lleu and wounded him; he did not manage to kill the God. Gwydion took defence of his foster-son and allowed Lleu to escape to heal. He killed Gronw and punished Blodeuwedd by turning her into an owl.

Spiritual Information:- Blodeuwedd is a Maiden Goddess yet this does not permit her to never having enjoyed the love of a man. She is independant in her body and choices, despite the bounds of an unwilling marriage. Even though she seems to be under the rule of man, by her creation, marriage, and punishment, she was there before Gwydion and Math invoked her. Her lovemaking with the Hunter and her connection to flowers ma…kes her the walking feminine spirit of the land. She is the embodiment of the Goddess in her many guises as shown by her multi-faceted personality.
She compliments Lleu in that he is the Light Eagle God of the Day, and she is the Dark Owl of the Night. She is mated to the God of the Light side of the year and the God of the Dark side of the year, mirroring the wheel of the year and the battle of the solstices; her double faces or light and dark reflect the Goddesses role in this.
She is the Maiden in her independance, youth, beauty and strength; the mother in her sexuality, love and lust; the crone in her cunning, death and the night owl.
In some cases Gronw the Strong can be seen as a manifestation of the Horned Hunter God Cernunnos and so it would be fitting to Couple Blodeuwedd with both he and Lleu.

Correspondences:-
* Owls
* Flowers
* Bright colours and Dark colours.
* Green
* Maiden Mother Crone

Offerings:-
* Flowers
* Floral Incense
* Bean, broom, burdock, meadowsweet, primrose, nettle, hawthorn, oak, and chestnut (flowers)

Festivals:-
* Celebrate and worship Blodeuwedd in any of her stages of maiden mother crone, at Imbolc, Beltane or Samhain. She can also be thought of at the solstices as her two men battle over her.

 

Source:

Goddess Spirals

 

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Deity of the Day for July 26th is Ares The God Of War

Deity of the Day

Ares (Mars)

Greek God of War

 

Ares (Roman equivalent is Mars) was the Greek god of war. He is one of the Twelve Olympians, and the son of Zeus and Hera. In Greek literature, he often represents the physical or violent and untamed aspect of war, in contrast to the armored Athena, whose functions as a goddess of intelligence include military strategy and generalship. Since ancient times the people, in order to solve their differences resorted to the most painful act for humans, war.

The ancient Greek mythology is dominated by two major combat operations: the ten-year Trojan War and the Argonaut’s campaign. So the Greeks coined a god, Ares, who personified this terrible scourge. He was always thirsty for blood and his main feature was the irrational rage and the lack of any courtesy.

Ares belongs to the second generation of Olympians. He was lawful son of Zeus and Hera. His love to cause wars and quarrels made him obnoxious not only to other gods but also to his father Zeus, who never missed an opportunity to attack him and call him a “stubborn head”. 

The biggest controversy was between Ares with Athena, who was also a war goddess. But Athena was, in parallel, the goddess of wisdom, so she was combining power with intelligence. That’s why most of the times she prevailed against bellicose Ares and was bringing him to shame. The most significant conflicts between them were made during the Trojan War.

As we are informed by Homer, the brawler God had promised to his mother Hera and Athena to help the Greeks. But, seduced by the beauty of Aphrodite, he passed at a critical moment in the opposing faction. For some time, he stood by at the main hero of the Trojans, Hector, who decimated the Achaean warriors, since Achilles was missing from the battlefield. Hera was indignant with her son who, since childhood, only caused problems, ran to Zeus and asked permission to evict Ares from the battle, injuring him. He accepted, since he was not at all fond of his son. Immediately Hera sent Athena to arrange the matter as she knew.

The wise goddess wore the Kynee, the cap of her uncle Hades, which made her invisible, and jumped at once from Olympus in the Trojan plain. Then she stood on the chariot of Diomedes that started battle with Ares, without knowing of course that he was against an Olympian god. Ares first threw his bronze spear against mortal warrior, but the unseen Athena repelled it with both her hands and it fell on the ground.

 

Then Diomedes threw his spear and Athena directed it in the side of Ares. He fell wounded on the ground and screamed with a terrible voice that panicked Greeks and Trojans, for he was like ten thousand warriors shouting together. Then he flew to Mount Olympus shrouded in thick clouds and immediately went to the palace of Zeus.

He showed him his wound and while weeping, he started complaining:

“Father Zeus, you see the injustices take place, but you are not mad. All gods always do your will and obey your orders. But you can not see Athena who always makes her own. You never argue with her since you gave birth to her by yourself. And now, she puts a mortal to hit me with his spear and ridicule me!”

The father of gods and men, furious with his son, responded with insulting words.

 

“Are you not ashamed to come before me whining? Know that I hate you, because you always like wars, fights and quarrels. You are a stubborn head exactly like your mother Hera. Know that if your father was any other, he would have thrown you in Tartarus, even more below than the Titans.”

Although Zeus used insulting words, Ares was his son was and he could not bear to see him hurt and crying. So Zeus instructed Paionian, doctor of the gods to heal his wound. But in the final battle of the Trojan War all the gods, with the permission of Zeus, ran fully armored in the battlefield. In the Greek camp joined Hera, Athena, Poseidon and the divine blacksmith Hephaestus. Beside the Trojans arrived dreadful Ares, master archer Artemis, long-haired Phoebus, Leto, the smiling Aphrodite and the river Xanthus.

Ares, who was embittered with Athena, because she always embarrassed him in front of the Olympians, charged with the first opportunity towards her and started talking with bad words:

 

“Shameless bitch, with your ego and insolence you have caused a lot of trouble to the gods!”

Then he threw his spear at aegis of Athena that even the thunder of Zeus could not pierce. The goddess shook and took two or three steps backwards. Without losing her courage, grabbed a huge rock that people had set up for border and hurled it the bellicose god. The rock struck Ares on the neck, forcing him to bend on his knees and fall down. His huge body spread seven square kilometers as he fell on the ground. His knees bled and his hair was filled with soils. All the gods started to laugh when they saw the god of war lying on the ground, who once again was ridiculed by Athena. Only Aphrodite ran to him, helped him get up and grabbing him by the hand raised him to Olympus.

 

Ares also had several differences with the famous hero Heracles (Hercules), who was enjoying the protection of Athena. Once, the Swan, son of warlike god and Pelopeias, wanted to build a temple from the skulls of men, in honor of his father. Therefore he was killing every passerby. So he tried to do the same thing with Heracles. Ares rushed alongside his son and forced the hero to withdraw. But then Heracles returned and killed the Swan.

For this event there are several variations. So, one myth tells that Swan agreed with Ares to kill Heracles. During the conflict the hero killed the Swan and the wounded immortal god in the thigh. Another poet tells that the Swan was the son of Ares and Pyrinis and challenged Heracles to a duel. The god wanted to help his son and tried to burn the opponent. But Zeus, who was the father of the hero, threw a thunder between them and separated them. Another son of Ares that had differences with Heracles was Diomedes of Thrace

 

Read More At Greek Mythology Pantheon
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