Deities

Deity of the Day for September 16th is Goddess Pomona

Deity of the Day

Goddess Pomona

Areas of Influence: Pomona was one of the Numina, the Roman guardian spirits who watched over people, homes and special places. She protected fruiting trees and gardens.

She is an agricultural Goddess , responsible for the care and cultivation of fruit trees and orchards. Her name is actually derived from the Latin word pomun, meaning fruit. Her dedication to her work left her little time for love. She turned down the offers of marriage from Silvanus and Picus but was eventually tricked into marriage by Vertumnus. This deity was served by high priests known as Flamen Pomonalis in a sacred grove known as the Pomonal.

 

Origins and Genealogy: I can find no references to her parents, siblings and children.

Strengths: A nurturer, dedicated to her job.  As a fertility Goddess she represented abundance.

Weaknesses: So busy looking after her trees that she has little time for herself.

Symbolism: A popular figure in art she is shown as a beautiful Goddess carrying a knife to prune with and a platter of fruit or a cornucopia.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples.

Festival: A feast was held annually on the November 1st when apples, nuts and grapes were consumed to celebrate the harvest.

Unlike many of the Roman Goddesses she has no specific Greek equivalent.

Pomona’s Archetype

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

As Goddess of the harvest she represents the Mother Archetype as she nurtures the fruits, trees and the plants in the garden.

How to Work With This Archetype

The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 13 is Gaia, The Greek Goddess of the Earth

Deity of the Day

 Gaia

The Greek Goddess of the Earth

Areas of Influence: The Greek Goddess of the Earth was called Gaia or Gaeo. In the Greek creation myth she was formed out of chaos to become the Earth. Gaia therefore represents the primal earth Goddess through whom the whole universe was created. She was the ultimate personification of Mother Nature.Gaia was also linked to the art of prophecy, responsible for the original oracle at Delphi before Apollo took over.

Gaia’s Children: The Greek Goddess of the Earth was lonely so she created from within her body, Pontus (the Sea) and Uranus (the Sky God). With her first husband, Uranus, she had many children including the original twelve Titan Gods and Goddesses: Oceanus, Coeus, Crius, Hyperion, Lapetus, Theia, Rhea, Themis, Mnemosyne, Phoebe, Tethys and Cronus. The couple also produced the Erinyes, Cyclops and the three monsters known as the Hecatoncheires.

Cronus,the youngest Titan God, castrated and killed his father with a stone sickle. This was at the request of Gaia, as she was worried that her jealous and fearful husband would harm their children. As Uranus died the Gigantes were formed where his blood touched the earth.

Gaia remarried and with her new husband, Pontus, gave birth to: Nerus, Thaumas, Phorrcys, Ceto and Eurybia.

Gaia’s Popularity: After the war, the Titans were overthrown by the Olympian Gods and the original Greek Goddess of the Earth‘s popularity began to wane. Some of her attributes were taken over by Rhea and Demeter. However, the Greek people continued to make offerings of barley and corn cakes and swore their sacred most oaths using her name.

In modern times her popularity has enjoyed a renaissance due to the scientist James Lovelock and his “Gaia hypothesis.” In this theory Gaia the earth is viewed as a holistic self-regulating organism.

Roman Equivalent: Terra

Symbolism: Often Depicted as a matronly woman or with the top of her body appearing out of the Earth. In some images she is also shown reclining, surrounded by infant Gods and Goddesses.

Gaia’s Archetype

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

The Greek Goddess of the Earth is the first mother and founding ancestor of all the Greek Gods and Goddesses.She is very protective of her off-spring and plots with Cronus to kill her husband when he cruelly imprisons her youngest children.

How To Work With The Mother Archetype

It is not necessary to be a biological mother to have this Archetype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective.

Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

Call upon the great fertility Goddess if you are trying to get pregnant or want to benefit from the wisdom of the Greek Goddess of the Earth.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for September 12th is Ceres Goddess of Agriculture

Deity of the Day

Ceres

Goddess of Agriculture

Areas of Influence: Ceres was the Roman Goddess of agriculture and grain. The word cereal is derived from her name. She is accredited with the discovery of spelt, an ancient strain of wheat and the knowledge of how to grow, fertilize and harvest cereal crops.

After a terrible famine in 496 B.C. the Sibylline books were consulted and a recommendation made that Rome adopt of the Greek Deities Demeter, Dionyisus and Persephone. Their identities were changed to Ceres, Liber and Libera. Together they formed the Avertine triad.

This Goddess also adopted Demeter’s mythology as she also lost her daughter to the God of the underworld, for six months of the year.

Her early Italian cult was similar to that of Tellus the Earth Goddess. She was aided in her agricultural duties by twelve minor Gods and Goddesses.

This Goddess was also Goddess of transitions, protecting woman at the vulnerable points in their lives: between girlhood and womanhood and the time of change between unmarried life, marriage and motherhood.

Her main temple is situated on Aventine Hill, one of seven hill tops that surrounded ancient Rome.

Origins and Genealogy: In Roman mythology she was the daughter of Saturn and Ops. She had several brothers and sisters: Juno, Jupiter, Neptune, Pluto and Vesta. She married her brother Jupiter and together they had a daughter named Proserpina.

Strengths: Fertility, abundance and endurance.

Weaknesses: Lived her life through her daughter.

Greek Equivalent: Demeter

 Symbolism

Pictured carrying a scepter or a farming tool in one hand and a basket of fruit or grain in the other.

Sacred Animal: Pigs. Ants were used in her temples to predict the weather and the future.

Sacred Plants: The chaste trees, corn and pumpkins. She was also offered the first fruits of the harvest. Poppies were her emblem as the grow in cornfields. All other flowers were banned as she had lost her daughter to the underworld when she was out picking flowers.

Festivals: Her festivals marked the different stages of the agricultural calendar. At the Paganalia festival when the seeds were sown,  a pregnant sow was sacrificed to her and the earth goddess Tellus to ensure an abundant crop yield. Her main festival, the Cerealia was celebrated over seven days in late April. This encouraged the ripening of the crops and prevented pests and diseases. This Goddess was also celebrated both by communities and households in the Ambarvalia which was held each May.

Ceres Archetypes

The Mother:

The Mother Archetype is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her.

Ceres is a grain Goddess who teaches people how to nurture and harvest her crops. Later she also takes on the Mother role of her Greek counterpart Demeter.

Rescuer:

The Rescuer provides strength and support to others in crisis. They act out of love with no expectation of a reward.

The shadow Rescuer expects the rescued party to be grateful and will often try to keep that person needy.

Ceres is distraught when her daughter goes missing and does not rest until she has found her. She is frustrated as she is unable to save her daughter and is forced to compromise.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 11th is Frigg The Norse Goddess

Deity of the Day

 Frigg The Norse Goddess

Areas of Influence: Frigg was the Norse Goddess of marriage, childbirth, motherhood, wisdom, household management and weaving and spinning.

She was the Queen of Aesir and the only one permitted to sit on the high seat other than her husband Odin.

This Goddess’s home was Fensalir (Marsh hall) in Asgard. All marshy and boggy ground was sacred to this Goddess.

As Goddess of weaving she was associated with weaving clouds and the threads of fate, known as Wyrd in the Nordic tradition. Despite this and the gift of prophecy she is unable to save her own son from his fate. The Goddess made him invincible to everything other than mistletoe but unfortunately Loki disguised himself and tricked her in to revealing this weakness.

She has more than ten handmaidens who assist her, the most well known of these are Hlin (Goddess of Protection), Gna (a messenger Goddess) and Fulla (a fertility Deity). Some academics have suggested that the attendants represent different faces of this particular Deity.

Barren women would invoke this Goddess and ask her to bless them with children.

Her name means “beloved one.” Other spellings of this Goddesses name include Frea, Fija, Friia, Frig and Friggja.

Origins and Genealogy: She was the daughter of Fjorgynn (the male personification of the earth) and was married to Odin with whom she had two sons, Balder and Hodr.

She was briefly married to Odin’s brother’s Vili and Ve as Odin had been away travelling a long time and was believed to be dead. When he finally returned, the marriage to Odin’s brothers was dissolved and she returned to her husband’s side.

Strengths: A loving mother and home maker.

Weaknesses: Unable to save her son.

 Symbolism

Like Freya she wears a ravens clock.

She is associated with constellation the Orion’s Belt which was known as the Frig’s Distaff upon which she winds the threads of fate and weaves the clouds.

Sacred Birds: Ravens, hawks and falcons.

Sacred Plants: Frigg’s grass is a plant was traditionally used as a sedative during birth. Mistletoe is also sacred to her.

Frigg’s Archetype

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

This Goddess was a devoted mother who was unable to prevent the death of her son. She is also a great domestic Goddess looking after the home.

How to Work With This Archetype

The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:
Goddess-Guide.com

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 10th is The Goddess Lakshmi

Deity of the Day

 The Goddess Lakshmi

 

Lakshmi is the Goddess of wealth and prosperity, both material and spiritual. The word ”Lakshmi” is derived from the Sanskrit word Laksme, meaning “goal.” Lakshmi, therefore, represents the goal of life, which includes worldly as well as spiritual prosperity. In Hindu mythology, Goddess Lakshmi, also called Shri, is the divine spouse of Lord Vishnu and provides Him with wealth for the maintenance and preservation of the creation.

In Her images and pictures, Lakshmi is depicted in a female form with four arms and four hands. She wears red clothes with a golden lining and is standing on a lotus. She has golden coins and lotuses in her hands. Two elephants (some pictures show four) are shown next to the Goddess. This symbolism conveys the following spiritual theme:

  • The four arms represent the four directions in space and thus symbolize omnipresence and omnipotence of the Goddess. The red color syinbolizes activity. The golden lining (embroidery) on Her red dress denotes prosperity. The idea conveyed here is that the Goddess is always busy distributing wealth and prosperity to the devotees. The lotus seat, which Lakshmi is standing upon, signifies that while living in this world, one should enjoy its wealth, but not become obsessed with it. Such a living is analogous to a lotus that grows in water but is not wetted by water.
  • The four hands represent the four ends of human life: dharma (righteousness), kama (genuine desires), artha (wealth), and moksha (liberation from birth and death). The front hands represent the activity in the physical world and the back hands indicate the spiritual activities that lead to spiritual perfection.
  • Since the right side of the body symbolizes activity, a lotus in the back right hand conveys the idea that one must perform all duties in the world in accordance with dharma. This leads to moksha (liberation), which is symbolized by a lotus in the back left hand of Lakshmi. The golden coins falling on the ground from the front left hand of Lakshmi illustrate that She provides wealth and prosperity to Her devotees. Her front right hand is shown bestowing blessings upon the devotees.
  • The two elephants standing next to the Goddess symbolize the name and fame associated with worldly wealth. The idea conveyed here is that a true devotee should not earn wealth merely to acquire name and fame or only to satisfy his own material desires, but should share it with others in order to bring happiness to others in addition to himself.
  • Some pictures show four elephants spraying water from golden vessels onto Goddess Lakshmi. The four elephants represent the four ends of human life as discussed above. The spraying of water denotes activity. The golden vessels denote wisdom and purity. The four elephants spraying water from the golden vessels on the Goddess illustrate the theme that continuous self-effort, in accordance with one’s dharma and governed by wisdom and purity, leads to both material and spiritual prosperity.

Goddess Lakshmi is regularly worshipped in home shrines and temples by Her devotees. A special worship is offered to Her annually on the auspicious day of Diwali, with religious rituals and colorful ceremonies specifically devoted to Her. 

- Bansi Pandit

Website: Hindu Deities

 

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 5th is The Goddess Pomona

Deity of the Day

Pomona

Areas of Influence: Pomona was one of the Numina, the Roman guardian spirits who watched over people, homes and special places. She protected fruiting trees and gardens.

She is an agricultural Goddess , responsible for the care and cultivation of fruit trees and orchards. Her name is actually derived from the Latin word pomun, meaning fruit. Her dedication to her work left her little time for love. She turned down the offers of marriage from Silvanus and Picus but was eventually tricked into marriage by Vertumnus. This deity was served by high priests known as Flamen Pomonalis in a sacred grove known as the Pomonal.

 

Origins and Genealogy: I can find no references to her parents, siblings and children.

Strengths: A nurturer, dedicated to her job.  As a fertility Goddess she represented abundance.

Weaknesses: So busy looking after her trees that she has little time for herself.

Symbolism: A popular figure in art she is shown as a beautiful Goddess carrying a knife to prune with and a platter of fruit or a cornucopia.

Sacred Animal/Bird/Plant: Apples.

Festival: A feast was held annually on the November 1st when apples, nuts and grapes were consumed to celebrate the harvest.

Unlike many of the Roman Goddesses she has no specific Greek equivalent.

Pomona’s Archetype

The Mother

The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.

In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

As Goddess of the harvest she represents the Mother Archetype as she nurtures the fruits, trees and the plants in the garden.

How to Work With This Archetype

The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

 

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Deity of the Day for Sept. 4th is Fortuna

Deity of the Day

Fortuna

Fortuna is the Roman Goddess of Luck, Fate, and Fortune, as Her name implies. She was a very popular Goddess, and was worshipped under many epithets depending on the type of luck one wished to invoke or the circumstances in play. She had many temples in Rome itself, as well as having important cult-centers in Antium (the modern Anzio), a city on the west coast of Italy about 30 miles south of Rome, and Praeneste (modern Palestrina), about 20 miles south-east of Rome, both of which were cities of Latium, the land of the Latini tribes. Her many temples in Rome, and the various aspects of Her worship are a reflection of the manners in which She was honored: from personal Goddess, overseeing the fate of the individual mother, young man, or soldier, to a Goddess of the State, ensuring the fortune of the populace, the luck of the Emperor, or the glorious fate of the entire Roman Empire.

Fortuna was usually depicted holding in one hand a cornucopia, or a horn of plenty, from which all good things flowed in abundance, representing Her ability to bestow prosperity; in the other She generally has a ship’s rudder, to indicate that She is the one who controls how lives and fates are steered. She could also be shown enthroned, with the same attributes of rudder and cornucopia, but with a small wheel built into the chair, representing the cycles of fate and the ups and downs of fortune. Sometimes She is blind, as an acknowledgment that good luck does not always come to those who seem to most deserve it; at other times She is described as having wings, much like many Etruscan Goddesses—and indeed She was equated with the old Etruscan Fate Goddess Nortia, who was often shown winged.

The name Fortuna finds its root in the Latin fero, meaning “to bring, win, receive, or get”. She may have originally been a Goddess of Fertility, Who brought prosperity and success in the form of abundant harvests and offspring. Her worship in Rome traditionally goes back to the time of Ancus Martius, the 4th King of Rome, who is said to have reigned from 640-616 BCE. According to the propaganda of the time (and the Romans invented an awful lot of it to make it seem that their city had always been destined for greatness, and wasn’t just some upstart town founded by a bunch of sheep herders on some hills surrounded by malaria-infested swampland, which it was), when Fortuna first came to Rome, She immediately threw off Her shoes and discarded Her wings, announcing that She’d found Her true home and intended to never leave it.

Alternatively, Fortuna’s name may derive from that of the Etruscan Goddess Veltha or Voltumna, whose name encompasses ideas of turning and the alternating seasons. Voltumna in turn may be related to the Roman Goddess Volumna, Who watched over and protected children; and both of these themes are found with Fortuna, who was often depicted with a wheel, and who was said to predict the fates of children at their births. As a Goddess of Fate Fortuna naturally had the power to foretell the future; and under Her aspect of Fortuna Primigenia in Praeneste She had an oracle, in which tablets inscribed with messages were chosen from a jar. She also had an oracular shrine at Her cult-center in Antium.

Fortuna had a very old temple in Rome on a hill between the Forum Romanum (the Roman Forum) and the Forum Boarium (supposedly the old cattle-market), near to the temple of Mater Matuta. Both temples had the same dedication day, the 10th of June, and each had a horseshoe-shaped altar before it of the earliest type. Fortuna’s temple had a very old statue of gilded wood inside, also of an archaic type; and the altar and statue indicate that Her worship dates at least to the earliest days of Rome, if She is not an earlier Goddess of the Latins.

The Emperor Trajan (97-117 CE) dedicated a temple to Fortuna, at which offerings were made to the Goddess on the 1st day of January, at the start of the New Year, probably to ensure good luck and success for the coming year. This temple was dedicated to Fortuna in all of Her aspects.

With Greek influence, Fortuna was equated to Tykhe, their Goddess of Luck and Fortune. Under the title Dame Fortune, Fortuna never lost Her power as an allegorical figure—She makes an appearance on card 10 of the Tarot Major Arcana, the Wheel of Fortune, and She is still to some extent honored today, for She features in gamblers’ prayers to “Lady Luck”.

She is associated with the Goddess Felicitas, the personification of happiness, and Spes, the Goddess of Hope.

Source:

Obscure Goddess Online

 

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The Origins of Hecate

 

Hecate (Hekate)

Known as Hecate or Hekate, she is the Goddess of Witchcraft, but where did she come from and how did she acquire such a reputation? On this page we look at the origins of the goddess we call Hecate.

The Origins of Hecate

Where did Hecate (Hekate) come from?

Introduction

Hecate’s origins are shrouded in myth and the mists of time. Far older than the gods of the monotheists – Yahovah (Yahweh) of the Jews, Christ of the Christians or Allah of the Muslims – she has held many divine offices and been worshipped and invoked for many different reasons.

‘Hecate’ from the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica

The following information is an edited version of the ‘Hecate’ entry appearing in the 1911 edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. There has been much new research since its publication and serious students are directed to Leo Ruickbie, Witchcraft Out of the Shadows (2004).

HECATE (Gr., ‘she who works from afar’), a goddess in Greek mythology. According to the generally accepted view, she is of Hellenic origin, but Farnell regards her as a foreign importation from Thrace, the home of Bendis, with whom Hecate has many points in common. She is not mentioned in the Iliad or the Odyssey, but in Hesiod (Theogony, 409) she is the daughter of the Titan Perses and Asterie, in a passage which may be a later interpolation by the Orphists (for other genealogies see Steuding in Roscher’s Lexikon). She is there represented as a mighty goddess, having power over heaven, earth and sea; hence she is the bestower of wealth and all the blessings of daily life. The range of her influence is most varied, extending to war, athletic games, the tending of cattle, hunting, the assembly of the people and the law-courts. Hecate is frequently identified with Artemis, an identification usually justified by the assumption that both were moon-goddesses. Farnell, who regards Artemis as originally an earth-goddess, while recognizing a genuine lunar element in Hecate from the 5th century, considers her a chthonian rather than a lunar divinity (see also Warr in Classical Review, ix. 390). He is of the opinion that neither borrowed much from, nor exercised much influence on, the cult and character of the other.

‘Hecate’ from Wikipedia.com

The following information is an edited extract of the ‘Hecate’ entry appearing on the Wikipedia.com website, which is in part derived from the 1911 edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, as well as other sources. Wikipedia is a user-contributed online encyclopedia, which means that it lacks scholarly rigour and editorial control, and should therefore be used with caution. For a scholarly discussion of Hecate serious students are directed to Leo Ruickbie, Witchcraft Out of the Shadows (2004).

Despite popular belief, Hecate was not originally a Greek goddess. She is unknown to Homer and in fact the earliest written references to her are in Hesiod’s Theogony. The place of origin of her cult is uncertain, but it is thought that she had popular cult followings in Thrace. Her most important sanctuary was Lagina, a theocratic city-state in which the goddess was served by eunuchs. Lagina, where the famous temple of Hecate drew great festal assemblies every year, lay in the originally-Macedonian colony of Stratonicea. In Thrace she played a role similar to that of lesser-Hermes, namely a governess of liminal points and the wilderness, bearing little resemblance to the night-walking crone. Additionally, this led to her role of aiding women in childbirth and the raising of young men.

There are two versions of Hecate that emerge in Greek myth. The lesser role integrates Hecate while not diminishing Artemis. In this version Hecate is a mortal priestess (commonly associated with Iphigeneia) who scorns and insults Artemis, eventually leading to her suicide. Artemis then adorns the dead body with jewelry and whispers for her spirit to rise and become her Hecate, and act similar to Nemesis as an avenging spirit (but solely for injured women). Such myths where a home god sponsors or ‘creates’ a foreign god were widespread in ancient cultures as a way of integrating foreign cults. Additionally, as Hecate’s cult grew, her figure was added to the myth of the birth of Zeus as one of the midwives that hid the child, while Cronus consumed the deceiving rock handed to him by Gaia.

The second version helps to explain how Hecate gains the title of the ‘Queen of Ghosts’ and her role as a goddess of sorcery. Similar to totems of Hermes—herms— placed at borders as a ward against danger, images of Hecate, as a liminal goddess, could also serve in such a protective role. It became common to place statues of the goddess at the gates of cities, and eventually domestic doorways. Over time, the association of keeping out evil spirits, lead to the belief that if offended Hecate could also let in evil spirits. Thus invocations to Hecate arose as her the supreme governess of the borders between the normal world and the spirit world.

Further Reading

 

 

Article Taken from 

Witchology, the history of Wicca & Witchcraft
by Dr Leo Ruickbie

 

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