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Have a Very Blessed & Happy Afternoon, my sweets! Till Tomorrow…


Winter Comments & Graphics

May the road rise to meet you,
May the wind be always at your back,
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall soft upon your fields and,
Until we meet again,
May Goddess hold you in the palm of Her hand.

Have a very blessed afternoon, my dear brothers & sister…

Love ya,

Lady A

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | 1 Comment

Magickal Goody of the Day for Dec. 17th – Salt Dough Ornaments

Magickal Goody of the Day

Salt Dough Ornaments

Salt dough is one of the easiest things in the world to make, and you can create just about anything from it. Use it with cookie cutters to make your own Sabbat ornaments.

Ingredients
  • 4 Cups flour
  • 1 Cup salt
  • 1 ½ Cups hot water
  • 1 tsp vegetable oil
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 60 minutes
Preparation

Combine the salt and flour, then add the water until the dough becomes elastic. Add the oil at this time and knead the dough (if it’s too sticky, add more flour). Once it’s a good consistency, make your decorations with cookie cutters. Bake ornaments at 200* until hard (about 20 – 30 minutes). Once they’ve cooled, paint them with designs and symbols, and seal with clear varnish.

If you’re planning to hang them, poke a hole through the ornament BEFORE baking them. Then after you’ve varnished them, run a ribbon or thread through the hole.

 

Source:

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Pagan Craft Making, The Sabbats | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Incense of the Day for December 17th – Binding Incense

Incense of the Day

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BINDING INCENSE

4 Parts Nettle
4 Parts Thistle
4 Parts Knotgrass
1/4 Part Nightshade
1/4 Part Aconite (wolfsbane)

Burn with caution during outdoor rituals to destroy baneful habits or thoughts. Use small amounts only.

*Do not inhale fumes!

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Crystal of the Day for December 17th – Galena

Crystal of the Day

Galena    


Hardness: 2.5+                     
Specific Gravity: approximately 7.5+                    
Chemistry: PbS, Lead Sulfide                            
Class: Sulfides                      
Crystallography: isometric                     
Cleavage: perfect in four direction forming cubes        
Fracture: uneven and rarely seen because of the perfect cleavage         
Streak: lead gray           
Luster: metallic to dull

Healing: Galena is called a Stone of Harmony. Excellent for use in grounding. Galena reduces inflammation and increases circulation of the body. Used to increase the assimilation of selenium and zinc. 

Do not use as an elixir.

Workings: Astrological sign is Capricorn. Vibrates to the master number 22 Use during meditation.

Chakra Applications: used to align the chakras

Foot Notes: Galena is the most important ore and the principal source of lead. It is found throughout the world. In the United States it is found inMissouri, Idaho, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Utah as well as in Australia, Canada, England, France, and Mexico. Galena specimens tarnish when exposed to air becoming dull in luster. Galena from certain regions is rich in silver.
Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods
Categories: Articles, Crystals/Gems, Daily Posts | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Herb of the Day for December 17th – Elecampane

Herb of the Day

Elecampane

 

Medicinal Uses: Elecampane is used for intestinal worms, water retention, and to lessen tooth decay and firm the gums. It gives relief to respiratory ailments. It is usually used in combination with other herbs. Elecampane is a specific for irritating bronchial coughs, especially in children. It may be used wherever there is copious catarrh formed e.g. in bronchitis or emphysema. It may be used in asthma and bronchitic asthma. Elecampane tea is much used to quiet coughing, to stimulate digestion and to tone the stomach; for bronchitis, urinary and respiratory tract inflammation, and menstrual problems. Elecampane oil is used for respiratory and intestinal catarrh, chronic diarrhea, chronic bronchitis, and whooping cough. The decoction or tincture is used for worms, and externally as a wash or fomentation for skin problems such as scabies and itches.

Elecampane has been used in the treatment of tuberculosis. The bitter principle makes it useful also to stimulate digestion and appetite.                                                                                                                                             

Externally it is used as a wash for wounds and itching rashes. It is burned to repel insects.                                       
Elecampane combines well with White Horehound, Coltsfoot, Pleurisy Root, Lungwort and Yarrow for respiratory problems.

Magickal uses: Add this herb to love charms and amulets of all kinds. Used with mistletoe and vervain, it is especially powerful. Use when scrying for better results. Place leaves and flowers into a pink pouch to attract love or for protection. Burn as incense to increase visions when scrying. Scatter the root around the home to attract the Fae.

Properties: Expectorant, anti-tussive, diaphoretic, hepatic, anti-microbial. Contains volatile oil, containing sesquiterpene lactones, main lyalamtolactone ( helenalin or elecampane camphor), isoalantolactone and their dihydro derivatives, alantic acid and azulene. As well as Inulin and miscellaneous; sterols, resin etc.

Growth: Elecampane enjoys roadsides and damp fields and pastures. Plant it in full sun in a damp, but not soggy, location. It is a perennial that grows 3 – 6 feet tall. The fibrous, top-shaped rootstock is brown outside and white inside. The stout, round stem is coarse and woolly. It bears large, alternate, ovate, serrate, olive-colored leaves with white veins. The large, yellow flower heads are solitary or grow in paniculate clusters from July to September. The fruit is a brown, quadrangular achene.The root is most commonly used. It is indigenous to Europe and temperate Asia, naturalized in the USA, and cultivated widely in Europe and also China.
Source:
Author: Crick
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts, Herbs | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Deity of the Day for December 17th – Minerva, Roman Goddess

Deity of the Day

Minerva

Minerva (Etruscan: Menrva) was the Roman goddess of wisdom and sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy. She was born with weapons from the godhead of Jupiter. From the 2nd century BC onwards, the Romans equated her with the Greek goddess Athena. She was the virgin goddess of music, poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, and magic. She is often depicted with her sacred creature, an owl usually named as the “owl of Minerva”, which symbolizes that she is connected to wisdom.

Stemming from an Italic moon goddess *Meneswā (‘She who measures’), the Etruscans adopted the inherited Old Latin name, *Menerwā, thereby calling her Menrva. It is assumed that her Roman name, Minerva, is based on this Etruscan mythology, Minerva was the goddess of wisdom, war, art, schools and commerce. She was the Etruscan counterpart to Greek Athena. Like Athena, Minerva was born from the head of her father, Jupiter (Greek Zeus).

By a process of folk etymology, the Romans could have linked her foreign name to the root men- in Latin words such as mens meaning “mind”, perhaps because one of her aspects as goddess pertained to the intellectual. The word mens is built from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- ‘mind’ (linked with memory as in Greek Mnemosyne/μνημοσύνη and mnestis/μνῆστις: memory, remembrance, recollection, manush in Sanskrit meaning mind).

Minerva was part of a holy triad with Tinia and Uni, equivalent to the Roman Capitoline Triad of Jupiter-Juno-Minerva. Minerva was the daughter of Jupiter.

As Minerva Medica, she was the goddess of medicine and doctors. As Minerva Achaea, she was worshipped at Luceria in Apulia where votive gifts and arms said to be those of Diomedes were preserved in her temple.

A head of “Sulis-Minerva” found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath

In Fasti III, Ovid called her the “goddess of a thousand works”. Minerva was worshiped throughout Italy, and when she eventually became equated with the Greek goddess Athena, she also became a goddess of war, although in Rome her warlike nature was less emphasized. Her worship was also taken out to the empire — in Britain, for example, she was conflated with the local wisdom goddess Sulis.

The Romans celebrated her festival from March 19 to March 23 during the day which is called, in the neuter plural, Quinquatria, the fifth after the Ides of March, the nineteenth, an artisans’ holiday . A lesser version, the Minusculae Quinquatria, was held on the Ides of June, June 13, by the flute-players, who were particularly useful to religion. In 207 BC, a guild of poets and actors was formed to meet and make votive offerings at the temple of Minerva on the Aventine Hill. Among others, its members included Livius Andronicus. The Aventine sanctuary of Minerva continued to be an important center of the arts for much of the middle Roman Republic.

Minerva was worshipped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno, at the Temple of Minerva Medica, and at the “Delubrum Minervae” a temple founded around 50 BC by Pompey on the site now occupied by the church of Santa Maria sopra Minerva facing the present-day Piazza della Minerva.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

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A Little Thought From Me to You….

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WOTC Cartoon of the Day – “Happy Holidays Truth”

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