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Incense of the Day for October 25th is Goddess Incense

Incense of the Day

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GODDESS INCENSE

1/2 dram Cypress oil
1/2 dram Olive oil
1/2 oz dried rose petals
1/2 oz White willow bark
3 dried Rowan berries
1 tsp anise seeds

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Gemstone of the Day for October 25th is Rutile

Gemstone of the Day

 

Rutile

 


Rutile derives its name from the Latin “rutilus”, red, in reference to the deep red color observed in some specimens when viewed by transmitted light.


Hardness: 6.0 – 6.5          
Specific Gravity: 4.23           
Chemistry: TiO2 Titanium dioxide
Class: Rutile group                       
Crystallography: Tetragonal                         
Cleavage: good
Fracture: uneven             
Streak: Greyish black, pale brown, light yellow              
Luster: adamantine to submetallic


Healing: Rutile is used to help strengthen the immune system and to help in the treatment of pulmonary and circulatory disorders. It is also used in the treatment of brochitis and strengthens the walls of the blood veins. An elixir is used externally for the treatment of wounds.

Magical Workings: Rutile is used to stimulate one’s problem solving capabilities by providing a more in-depth understanding of the details involved. It is a good stone to wear for balance. Rutile is used to balance the aura and is a excellent stone for astral projection.
Rutile is associated with the astrological signs of Gemini and Taurus. It vibrates to the number of 4.

Chakra Applications: Rutile is used to cleanse all of the chakras.

Foot Notes: Rutile is a mineral composed primarily of titanium dioxide. Rutile has among the highest refractive indices of any known mineral and also exhibits high dispersion.
Rutile is found as an accessory mineral in some altered igneous rocks, and in certain gneisses and schists. Rutile is one of the five forms of titanium dioxide found in nature.
Source:
Author: Crick
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Herb of the Day for October 25th is Licorice

Herb of the Day

Licorice

 

Medicinal Uses: Licorice is used to relieve respiratory ailments such as allergies, bronchitis, colds, sore throats, and tuberculosis. Licorice root is often used to prevent and treat stomach ulcers. Licorice is also used in the treatment of heart disease because of its effects on cholesterol and blood pressure. It has also been used for over 3,000 years by the Chinese as a tonic to rejuvenate the heart and spleen, and as a treatment for ulcers, cold symptoms, and skin disorders. Licorice is used in treating adrenal insufficiencies such as hypoglycemia and Addison’s disease, counteracting stress, and in purifying the liver and bloodstream.

Persons with a history of congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and liver disorders should not use licorice compounds. Do not use if you are pregnant or nursing.

Magickal uses:

Properties: Licorice is demulcent, expectorant, diuretic, and laxative. It contains glycosides, flavonoids, asparagine, isoflavonoids, chalcones and coumarins. Primary of these is Glycyrrhetinic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory compound.
Licorice Root contains Vitamins E, B-complex, phosphorous, biotin, niacin, pantothenic acid, lecithin, manganese, iodine, chromium, and zinc.

Growth: Licorice is a mediterranean perennial plant having blue flowers, pinnately compound leaves, and a sweet, distinctively flavored root.
Source:
Author:  Crick
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Deity of the Day for October 25th is Ninurta

Deity of the Day

Ninurta

 

Ninurta (Nin Ur: Lord of the Earth/Plough) in Sumerian and Akkadian mythology was the god of Lagash, identified with Ningirsu with whom he may always have been identical. In older transliteration the name is rendered Ninib and in early commentary he was sometimes portrayed as a solar deity.

In Nippur, Ninurta was worshiped as part of a triad of deities including his father, Enlil and his mother, Ninlil. In variant mythology, his mother is said to be the deity Ninhursag.

Ninurta often appears holding a bow and arrow, a sickle sword, or a mace named Sharur: Sharur is capable of speech in the Sumerian legend “Deeds and Exploits of Ninurta” and can take the form of a winged lion and may represent an archetype for the later Shedu.

In another legend, Ninurta battles a birdlike monster called Imdugud (Akkadian: Anzû); a Babylonian version relates how the monster Anzû steals the Tablets of Destiny which Enlil requires to maintain his rule. Ninurta slays each of the monsters later known as the “Slain Heroes” (the Warrior Dragon, the Palm Tree King, Lord Saman-ana, the Bison-beast, the Mermaid, the Seven-headed Snake, the Six-headed Wild Ram), and despoils them of valuable items (Gypsum, Strong Copper, the Magilum boat [1]), and finally Anzû is killed by Ninurta who delivers the Tablet to his father, Enlil.

The consort of Ninurta was Ugallu in Nippur and Bau when he was called Ningirsu.

The cult of Ninurta can be traced back to the oldest period of Sumerian history. In the inscriptions found at Lagash he appears under his name Ningirsu, “the lord of Girsu”, Girsu being the name of a city where he was considered the patron deity.

Ninurta appears in a double capacity in the epithets bestowed on him, and in the hymns and incantations addressed to him. On the one hand he is a farmer and a healing god who releases humans from sickness and the power of demons; on the other he is the god of the South Wind as the son of Enlil, displacing his mother Ninlil who was earlier held to be the goddess of the South Wind. Enlil’s brother, Enki, was portrayed as Ninurta’s mentor from whom Ninurta was entrusted several powerful Mes, including the Deluge.

He remained popular under the Assyrians: two kings of Assyria bore the name Tukulti-Ninurta. Ashurnasirpal II (883—859 BCE) built him a temple in the capital city of Calah (now Nimrud). In Assyria, Ninurta was worshipped along with Aššur and Mulissu.

In the late neo-Babylonian and early Persian period, syncretism seems to have fused Ninurta’s character with that of Nergal. The two gods were often invoked together, and spoken of as if they were one divinity.

In the astral-theological system Ninurta was associated with the planet Saturn, or perhaps as offspring or an aspect of Saturn. In his capacity as a farmer-god, there are similarities between Ninurta and the Greek harvest-god Kronos, whom the Romans in turn identified with their fertility-god Saturn.

From: Wiki

The god Ninurta has been described in the handbooks of mythology as the warrior god and the god of hunting, and sometimes his role as the patron of agriculture has been emphasised in the scholarly literature. These are important aspects of Ninurta and the definitions are correct. The god Ninurta is a very complex figure and in the present paper I will deal with his aspect as scribe and the god of wisdom, a role which has not been much discussed so far. Ninurta is the city-god of Nippur, the city of letters, where more than 80% of all known Sumerian literary compositions have been found (Gibson 1993). It seems inevitable that scribal activity in the city must have been patronized by some god of the city. Ninurta is a suitable candidate for this role. There is some evidence which confirms that Ninurta is a god patronizing scribal activities. In later Babylonia, the god of scribal arts was Marduk’s son Nabu. In my paper I will claim that the relationship between Marduk and Nabu was modelled on the relationship between Enlil and Ninurta and Nabu’s role as the scribe among the gods was the inheritance of Ninurta.

A Sumerian myth Ninurta’s journey to Eridu describes Ninurta’s acquisition of powers in Abzu and he determines the fates together with An in assembly (see Reisman 1971). This myth is an etiological myth. Eridu housed the god of wisdom Ea and his abode Abzu was mythical source of the divine wisdom. According to my view this Ninurta’s journey to Eridu was an etiology how Ninurta obtained his wisdom among the other powers for the benefit of the land. In Babylonia, Ninurta’s successor Nabû lived in Borsippa, where his temple Ezida had a by-name bīt ţuppi “the tablet house”. Ninurta’s connection with the Tablet of Destinies is attested in the poorly preserved Sumerian myth “Ninurta and the Turtle”.

Ninurta’s wisdom and his passion for the scribal arts are attested in his epithets. In Lugale he is called “the very wise” (gal-zu, ln. 152) and “gifted with broad wisdom” (gíštu-dagal, ln. 153). When Ninurta blocked the powerful waters threatening the land by means of stones in the epic, he is described to have applied his great wisdom and cleverness on the situation (347ff.). The Standard Babylonian epic of Anzu describes how Ninurta took hold of the Tablet of Destinies in the battle against Anzu who had stolen it. The possession of the Tablet of Destinies was also an important characteristic of Babylonian Nabu in his capacity as the god of scribal arts. We know that the Anzu epic existed already in an Old Babylonian version which told the same story. So I feel confident to claim that as the holder of the Tablet of Destinies, Ninurta precedes Nabu.

In the Standard Babylonian version, after Ninurta’s triumph over Anzu the great gods entrust to Ninurta a divine secret. By seeing the sign of Ninurta’s victory, Dagan rejoices, summons all the gods and says to them: “The mighty one has outroared Anzu in his mountain … Let him stand with the gods his brethren, that he may hear the secret lore, [let him hear] the secret lore of the gods” (III 26.30-31). The knowledge of the secret lore (pirištu) is an award which was not promised to Ninurta by the mother goddess before he went to the battle, but attested in the other sources. Ninurta was called šēmi pirišti “who has heard the secret” (Lugale 153, še-uraš), or bēl pirišti “the master of the secret lore” (see van Dijk 1983: 6). Among the mystical names which are given to Ninurta in the epilogue of the Anzu epic is E-Ibbi-Anu (III, 133) which is explained as ‘Master of the Secret Lore’ (bēl pirišti – en ad.hal).

There exists a remarkable inconsistency in the Anzu epic in regard to who is Ninurta’s father: throughout in the epic it is Enlil who is called the father of Ninurta (I 208, II 19.22) until in II 101 it is surprisingly Ea (cf. SAA Anzu III 159)! Marduk or Enlil and Ea/ Enki also alternate as fathers of Nabû, the Babylonian god of scribal arts (Pomponio 1978: 161-6. Thus the Epic of Anzu offers enough evidence that Ninurta was a wise god who controls the tablet of destinies and this must be related to his role as the god of the scribal arts. The Babylonian god Nabû has taken over these roles to which Sumerian Ninurta of Nippur was the ancestor.

Ninurta’s wisdom is probably connected with his swiftness. Ninurta’s victory over his enemies was celebrated in the first millennium rituals by a cultic footrace. Swiftness celebrated in these rituals originates with the swiftness of attack by which Ninurta defeated the enemies, but it is also swiftness in understanding. Ninurta is like a victorious king on the military operation who realizes quickly the intentions of enemy and how to vanquish them. The swifter computer the better it is as we all know.

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A Little Thought From Me to You……..

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WOTC Cartoon of the Day – “Some People Will Do Anything, lol!”

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A Little Humor For Your Day – Old Proverbs/New Meanings

Old Proverbs/New Meanings

 

A first grade school teacher in Virginia had twenty-five students in her class.

She presented each child in her classroom the first half of a well known proverb and asked them to come up with the remainder of the proverb.

It’s hard to believe these were actually done by first graders. Their insight may surprise you. While reading, keep in mind that these are first graders, 6-year-olds, because the last one is a classic!

1. Don’t change horses >>>>>>>>>> until they stop running.
2. Strike while the >>>>>>>>>> bug is close.
3. It’s always darkest before >>>>>>>>>> Daylight Saving Time.
4. Never underestimate the power of >>>>>>>>>> termites.
5. You can lead a horse to water but >>>>>>>>>> how?
6. Don’t bite the hand that >>>>>>>>>> looks dirty.
7. No news is >>>>>>>>>> impossible.
8. A miss is as good as a >>>>>>>>>> Mr.
9. You can’t teach an old dog new >>>>>>>>>> math.
10. If you lie down with dogs, you’ll >>>>>>>>>> stink in the morning.
11. Love all, trust >>>>>>>>>> me.
12. The pen is mightier than the >>>>>>>>>> pigs.
13. An idle mind is >>>>>>>>>> the best way to relax.
14. Where there’s smoke there’s >>>>>>>>>> pollution.
15. Happy the bride who >>>>>>>>>> gets all the presents.
16. A penny saved is >>>>>>>>>> not much
17. Two’s company, three’s >>>>>>>>>> the Musketeers
18. Don’t put off till tomorrow what >>>>>>>>>> you put on to go to bed.
19. Laugh and the whole world laughs with you, cry and >>>>>>>>>> you have to blow your nose.
20. There are none so blind as >>>>>>>>>> Stevie Wonder.
21. Children should be seen and not >>>>>>>>>> spanked or grounded.
22. If at first you don’t succeed >>>>>>>>>> get new batteries.
23. You get out of something only what you >>>>>>>>>> see in the picture on the box.
24. When the blind lead the blind >>>>>>>>>> get out of the way.

And the WINNER and last one!

25. Better late than >>>>>>>>>> pregnant.

 

Source:
Jokes Warehouse.com

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WOTC Quiz: What Soul Sign Are You?

What Soul Sign Are You?

This elemental approach to the human soul is a fascinating way to understand who you are, especially in relationship to others. Do you crave attention from a partner? You may be a Fire type. Do you like to organize and plan activities with your significant other? You may be an Earth.

Take this simple quiz to find out your soul-type so you can learn more about the ways you relate:

1. You sometimes have regrets, but nonetheless you revel in the joy of having created an effect, whether good or bad. You live in a drama of sorts, either emotionally or creatively.

2. You are a person who needs attention, who needs to be recognized and admired, who is sensitive and easily hurt over the smallest thing, who can love and hate with equal passion.

3. You are a person who thrives on love and passion in personal relationships, who needs to be number one in their partner’s life, who likes to have their own way, who feels easily neglected and is capable of being quite jealous when their spouse’s attention is somewhere else.

4. You are a person who needs to plan before acting, although you are determined to turn your plans into action. You make lists and like to take control.

5. You pay close attention, striving for perfection, even in the little things, generally organized, especially in situations you consider important, sensitive but able to reason and to be fair, steady, and reliable.

6. You thrive on being the organizer in the family; are loyal to your spouse and expect the same respect and loyalty in return; can seem on occasion to be bossy and you like to take charge; you like to be romanced and need genuine affection.

7. You don’t like pressure, and you don’t like to be upset or argue, but you do like new people and new experiences.

8. You love animals and children, do not sweat the small stuff, and are usually easygoing, happy to go along in life without fuss, generally calm, and somewhat passive.

9. You thrive on simply being loved, are undemanding in your personal relationships, like to keep things simple and uncomplicated, hate arguments and fights, and will try in most cases with your spouse to pacify and keep things on an even keel.

10. You usually find a way, through compromise, to please others and yourself. You are able to evaluate and solve problems by negotiating and seeking harmony.

11. You avoid attention, shy away from the limelight but still like approval from others for work well done; you strive to be fair and considerate of others’ feelings, but can be so immersed in your own life that you can be neglectful of issues outside yourself or your family.

12. You thrive on the ability to communicate with your spouse and family; feel the need to always strive to be seen to be reasonable, even when they perhaps cannot be, and are strong-minded and capable of standing your ground in an argument when issues are important.

If you answered yes to 1, 2 and 3, you are a FIRE.

If you answered yes to 4, 5, and 6, you are an EARTH.

If you answered yes to 7, 8, and 9, you are an AIR.

If you answered yes to 10, 11, and 12, you are a WATER.

Be sure to read this great book to find out more about your sign and the ways it manifests.

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