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Enjoy the rest of your Sunday and we shall see you tomorrow. Till then….

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Magickal Goody of the Day for August 2nd is Lammas Charm for Gathering in Abundance

Magickal Goody of the Day

besom

Lammas Charm for Gathering in Abundance

 

You will need:

A broom or beson

Ribbon (traditional Lammas colors, green(for abundance) or gold(for prosperity and gathering)

A Sprig of Mint

As far as the broom or beson goes, any broom/besom will do as it is always the intent of your actions that are important. If you don’t have a broom then collect a bundle of twigs and tie time at the top with your ribbon to make a hand shaped broom. The broom/besom is a potent symbo of hearth and home, found in some form in almost every home. It is a traditional magickal tool useful for everyday charms as it has the imprint of its owner firmly on it.

Next take your sprig of mint (ideally from your own garden, or dried mind – put in a pouch. The mint represents abundance and plenty and is easily accessible to obtain.

Take your broom and tie your ribbon around the top. Tie in your sprig of mint or securely fasten your pouch. Take your broom outside, place both hands on the stave and focus on your intention – gathering in the harvest for winter. Turn slowly three times in a clockwise direction then start to sweep towards your door saying:

“By one, two, three and four, sweep Lammas gifts to my door. May abundance be a constant friend by my hearth till Winter’s end.”

If you don’t have an outside space, you can sweep from your front door inwards to either you kitchen or hearth.

Repeat this three times, take your besom back into your house and put it in its usual place. You can leave the ribbon on for as long as you want to. If you have made your own broom you can place it where you consider the heart of your home to be. You can return the mint to the earth and be sure to say thank you for the use and gift of it.

 

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Incense of the Day for August 2nd is Lughnasadh Incense

Incense of the Day

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LUGHNASADH INCENSE

2 Parts Frankincense
1 part Heather
1 Part Apple Blossoms
1 pich Blackberry leaves
few drops Ambergris oil

Burn during Wiccan rituals on Aug 1 or 2, or at that time to attune with the coming harvest.

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Gemstone of the Day for August 2nd is Pyrite

Gemstone of the Day


Pyrite

(Pale brass-yellow)

 

The name Pyrite comes from the Greek word “pyr” (fire) because pyrite emits sparks when struck by steel.

 

Hardness: 6–6.5

Specific Gravity: 4.95–5.10

Chemistry: FeS2 Iron Sulfide

Class: Sulfides

Crystallography: Isometric Diploidal

Cleavage: Indistinct

Fracture: Very uneven, sometimes conchoidal

Streak: Greenish-black to brownish-black

Luster: metallic

Healing: Pyrite is used to tprevent and to treat DNA damage. It is also used in the treatment of Bronchitis and other lung diseases. And it is used to lower fevers and related inflammation.

Magical Workings: Pyrite is an excellent stone to use when shielding against negative energy. Carry this stone when engaged in hazardous types of work. Pyrite is also useful in memory enhancement. It helps one to communicate more openly and honestly, providing both emotional and physical protection. Pyrite is also used to ease the discomfort of menstruation.

Folks in ancient Mexico made scrying mirrors out of pyrite; they were created by polishing one side flat, to use for scrying, while the rounded side was carved with mystical symbols to assist in the scrying process.

Pyrite is associated with the astrological sign of Leo and vibrates to the number 3.

Chakra Applications: Pyrite is used to open and energize the Kundalini/Root chakra. Pyrite also vibrates to the solar plexus chakra, thus strengthening ones will.

Foot Notes: Pyrite’s metallic luster and pale-to-normal, brass-yellow hue have earned it the nickname fool’s gold because of its resemblance to gold. Pyrite is the most common of the sulfide minerals. Pyrite is usually found associated with other sulfides or oxides in quartz veins, sedimentary rock, and metamorphic rock, as well as in coal beds, and as a replacement mineral in fossils.

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

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Herb of the Day for August 2nd is Oats

Herb of the Day


Oats

(Avena sativa)

Medicinal Uses: Oat gruel is a mild nutritious aliment, of easy digestion in inflammatory cases and fevers. It is found useful also as a demulcent enema and boiled into a thick paste makes a good emollient poultice.

Magickal Uses: Oats are used in money and prosperity spells.Oats are feminine and its planet is Venus. It is associated with the Element of Earth.

Properties: Nervine, stimulant, antispasmodic, diuretic; emollient; refrigerant. Oats contain starch, gluten, albumen and other protein compounds, sugar, gum oil, and salts. Oat grains are high in carbohydrates and contain about 13 percent protein and 7.5 percent fat. They are a source of calcium, iron, vitamin B1, and nicotinic acid.

Growth: Annual growing to 1.5m. The wild oat was first found in western Europe, apparently as a weed mixed with barley. It is in flower from June to July, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite and are pollinated by Wind.

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

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Deity of the Day for August 2nd is Lugh, The Celtic God

Deity of the Day

Lugh

Master of Skills

Patron of the Arts:

Similar to the Roman god Mercury, Lugh was known as a god of both skill and the distribution of talent. There are countless inscriptions and statues dedicated to Lugh, and Julius Caesar himself commented on this god’s importance to the Celtic people. Although he was not a war god in the same sense as the Roman Mars, Lugh was considered a warrior because to the Celts, skill on the battlefield was a highly valued ability.

In Ireland, which was never invaded by Roman troops, Lugh is called sam ildanach, meaning he was skilled in many arts simultaneously.

Lugh Enters the Hall of Tara:

In one famous legend, Lugh arrives at Tara, the hall of the high kings of Ireland. The guard at the door tells him that only one person will be admitted with a particular skill — one blacksmith, one wheelwright, one bard, etc. Lugh enumerates all the great things he can do, and each time the guard says, “Sorry, we’ve already got someone here who can do that.” Finally Lugh asks, “Ah, but do you have anyone here who can do them ALL?” At last, Lugh was allowed entrance to Tara.

The Book of Invasions:

Much of the early history of Ireland is recorded in the Book of Invasions, which recounts the many times Ireland was conquered by foreign enemies. According to this chronicle, Lugh was the grandson of one of the Fomorians, a monstrous race that were the enemy of the Tuatha De Danann. Lugh’s grandfather, Balor of the Evil Eye, had been told he would be murdered by a grandson, so he imprisoned his only daughter in a cave.

One of the Tuatha seduced her, and she gave birth to triplets. Balor drowned two of them, but Lugh survived and was raised by a smith. He later led the Tuatha in battle, and indeed killed Balor.

Roman Influence:

Julius Caesar believed that most cultures worshipped the same gods and simply called them by different names. In his Gallic War essays, he enumerates the popular deities of the Gauls and refers to them by what he saw as a corresponding Roman name. Thus, references made to Mercury actually are attributed to a god Caesar also calls Lugus — Lugh. This god’s cult was centered in Lugundum, which later became Lyon, France. His festival on August 1 was selected as the day of the Feast of Augustus, by Caesar’s successor, Octavian Augustus Caesar, and it was the most important holiday in all of Gaul.

Weapons and War:

Although not specifically a war god, Lugh was known as a skilled warrior. His weapons included a mighty magic spear, which was so bloodthirsty that it often tried to fight without its owner. According to Irish myth, in battle, the spear flashed fire and tore through the enemy ranks unchecked. In parts of Ireland, when a thunderstorm rolls in, the locals say that Lugh and Balor are sparring – thus giving Lugh one more role, as a god of storms.

The Many Aspects of Lugh:

According to Peter Beresford Ellis, the Celts held smithcraft in high regard. War was a way of life, and smiths were considered to have magical gifts — after all, they were able to master the element of Fire, and mold the metals of the earth using their strength and skill. Yet in Caesar’s writings, there are no references to a Celtic equivalent of Vulcan, the Roman smith god.

In early Irish mythology, the smith is called Goibhniu, and is accompanied by two brothers to create a triple god-form. The three craftsmen make weaponry and carry out repairs on Lugh’s behalf as the entire host of the Tuatha De Danann prepares for war. In a later Irish tradition, the smith god is seen as a master mason or a great builder. In some legends, Goibhniu is Lugh’s uncle who saves him from Balor and the monstrous Formorians.

One God, Many Names

The Celts had many gods and goddesses, due in part to the fact that each tribe had its own patron deities, and within a region there might be gods associated with particular locations or landmarks. For example, a god who watched over a particular river or mountain might only be recognized by the tribes who lived in that area. Lugh was fairly versatile, and was honored nearly universally by the Celts. The Gaulish Lugos is connected to the Irish Lugh, who in turn is connected to the Welsh Llew Llaw Gyffes.

Celebrating the Harvest of Grain

The Book of Invasions tells us that Lugh came to be associated with grain in Celtic mythology after he held an harvest fair in honor of his foster mother, Tailtiu. This day became August 1, and that date ties in with the first grain harvest in agricultural societies in the Northern Hemisphere. In fact, in Irish Gaelic, the word for August is lunasa. Lugh is honored with corn, grains, bread, and other symbols of the harvest. This holiday was called Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NA-sah). Later, in Christian England the date was called Lammas, after the Saxon phrase hlaf maesse, or “loaf mass.”

An Ancient God for Modern Times

For many Pagans and Wiccans, Lugh is honored as the champion of artistry and skills. Many artisans, musicians, bards, and crafters invoke Lugh when they need assistance with creativity. Today Lugh is still honored at the time of harvest, not only as a god of grain but also as a god of late summer storms.

Even today, in Ireland many people celebrate Lughnasadh with dancing, song, and bonfires. The Catholic church also has set this date aside for a ritual blessing of farmers’ fields.

 

 

Source:

 

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This Is My Path

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Your Daily Influences for Sunday, August 2nd

Your Daily Influence

August 2nd, 2015

 

 

The Devil Reversed
The reversed Devil signifies a spiritual rebirth, freedom from the preoccupation with the secular and the overcoming of pride and selfishness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Berkano
Berkano reversed may foretell family problems and dissatisfaction. Your life path my not be clear to you at this time. Be careful to protect that which is yours.

 

 

 

The Tortoise
The tortoise represents the dome of the sky, the universe. It tells you to take slow, deliberate steps and you can acheive everything you desire.

 

 

 

Your Daily Influences represent events and challenges the current day will present for you. They may represent opportunities you should be ready to seize. Or they may forewarn you of problems you may be able to avoid or lessen. Generally it is best to use them as tips to help you manage your day and nothing more.

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