July, the Seventh Month of the year of our Goddess, 2015

227 years ago…on July 4th, 1776
This great nation, the United States of America,
In a struggle for what was right and free,
Was proudly born…
May we celebrate that precious freedom
For which our forbears fought so bravely…
The freedom that is inherent
In the Stars and Stripes, our revered flag…
Celebrate Freedom
This Fourth of July!

The Holiday Spot

buntingJULY – MEAD MOON

July is the seventh month of the year. It’s astrological sign is Cancer, the crab (June 21 – July 22), a cardinal water sign ruled by the Moon. July is the month of the ripening. In orchards, fields, and gardens, nature moves toward the miracle of the harvest. In July heat, the Goddess fulfills her promise and oversees maturing crops. The Summer Solstice has passed, but nature pulses with life. Hummingbirds flash among the bee balm, and mint varieties spread like wildfire. Water is an important magical element in July. Birds refresh themselves in birdbaths. Thunder rumbles on hot afternoons, bringing a promise of rain. Dragonflies skim the surface of ponds, and vacationers head to the shore. Salt water and seashells are good ways to include the element of water in any rituals now. Independence Day, July 4, is the major holiday of high summer. Not only can we celebrate our nation’s independence, we can also give thanks for July’s abundance, which will sustain us during the coming months. We are blessed with richness in July, perhaps the reason the old ones referred to July’s Full Moon as the Blessing Moon (or as we refer to it on this site, the Mead Moon). Magick during this Moon may include all forms of prosperity charms. When you cast a spell now, you will feel the vitality of the earth.

buntingTHE MEAD MOON

The Seventh Esbat or full moon after Yule is the Mead Moon. A time of vivid dreams and lunar fertility, it represents a harmony and joy that permeates everything in the universe. Mead is the name of the heavenly drink of the old Teutonic Gods. Probably the first fermented beverage ever made by humankind, it is considered to have medicinal and healing qualities.

Wiccan Spell A Night: Spells, Charms, And Potions For The Whole Year
Sirona Knight

buntingCORRESPONDENCES FOR THE MONTH OF JULY

NATURE SPIRITS: faeries of the crops, hobgoblins

HERBS: honeysuckle, agrimony, lemon balm, hyssop

COLORS: Blue, gray and silver

SCENTS: orris and frankincense

STONES: pearl, moonstone, white agate

TREES: Oak, acacia, ash

ANIMALS: Crab, turtle, dolphin and whale

BIRDS: starling, ibis, swallow

DEITIES: Khepera, Athene, Juno, Hel, Holda, Cerridwen, Venus

POWER/ADVICE: July is strong in relaxed energy. A time to prepare do dream scaping, divination, meditation, and goals in the spiritual realm.

buntingSymbols & Folklore for the Month of July

July’s Sign of the Zodiac
Cancer: June 21st thru July 22nd
Leo: July 23rd thru August 21

July’s Celtic Tree Astrology
Oak (The Stabilizer): June 10 thru July 7
Holly (The Ruler): July 8 thru August 4

July’s Birthstone
Ruby
Ruby represent vitality, confidence and strength

July’s Birth Flower
Acanthus
“Look to my petals for your nurturing.”

July’s Folklore

“St. Swithin’s day, if thou dost rain, for forty days it shall remain.”

“St. Swithin’s day, if thou be fair, for forty days, twill rain nae mair!”

“If the first of July it be rainy weather, twill rain more or less for four weeks together.”

Hedgewitch Book of Days: Spells, Rituals, and Recipes for the Magical Year

Mandy Mitchell

buntingJuly’s Monthly Events &  Observations

(Monthly)

  • The traditional period known as “fence month” (the closed season for deer in England) ended July 9 (date varied)
  • End of the Trinity term(sitting of the High Court of Justice of England) July 31
  • Elections of Japanese House of Councillors, replacing half of its seats, held every three years (the latest one in 2013″.
  • Season of Emancipation (April 14 to August 23)
  • Engineer’s Days (Singapore) 2015 date: July 22-24.
  • Māori Language Week (New Zealand) 2015 date: 27 July—2 August
  • National Ice Cream Month, United States

(Monthly Observations)

  • Ramadan (Islamic calendar) 2015 date: 18 June – 16 July
  • Asalha Puja (Buddhism) 2015 date: July 2
  • Start of Vassa (Buddhism) 2015 date: July 2
  • Sankashti Chaturthi (Hindu calendar) 2015 date: July 4
  • Seventeenth of Tammuz (Judaism) 2015 date: July 5
  • Vardavar (Armenia) 98 days (14 weeks) after Pascha. 2015 date: July 12. 2016 date: July 3
  • Bon Festival (Eastern Japan) 2015 date: July 13
  • Karka Sankranti (Hindu calendar) 2015: July 16 (end of Uttarayana period, start of Dakshinayana period)
  • Eid al-Fitr (Islamic calendar) 2015 date: July 17
  • Jagganath Ratha-Yatra (Hindu calendar) 2015: July 17
  • Tisha B’Av (Judaism) 2015 date: July 26
  • Shayani Ekadashi (Hindu calendar) 2015 date: July 27
  • Chaturmas(Hindu calendar) 2015: July 27-November 22 (also observed in Jainism, Buddhism)
  • Guru Purnima (Hindu calendar) 2015 date: July 31

buntingThe Fourth of July

Independence Day, commonly known as the Fourth of July or July Fourth, is a federal holiday in the United States commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain. Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the National Day of the United States.

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A Little Background

During the American Revolution, the legal separation of the Thirteen Colonies from Great Britain occurred on July 2, 1776, when the Second Continental Congress voted to approve a resolution of independence that had been proposed in June by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia declaring the United States independent from Great Britain. After voting for independence, Congress turned its attention to the Declaration of Independence, a statement explaining this decision, which had been prepared by a Committee of Five, with Thomas Jefferson as its principal author. Congress debated and revised the wording of the Declaration, finally approving it on July 4. A day earlier, John Adams had written to his wife Abigail:

The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.

Adams’s prediction was off by two days. From the outset, Americans celebrated independence on July 4, the date shown on the much-publicized Declaration of Independence, rather than on July 2, the date the resolution of independence was approved in a closed session of Congress.

Historians have long disputed whether Congress actually signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, even though Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Benjamin Franklin all later wrote that they had signed it on that day. Most historians have concluded that the Declaration was signed nearly a month after its adoption, on August 2, 1776, and not on July 4 as is commonly believed.

Coincidentally, both John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, the only signers of the Declaration of Independence later to serve as Presidents of the United States, died on the same day: July 4, 1826, which was the 50th anniversary of the Declaration. Although not a signer of the Declaration of Independence, but another Founding Father who became a President, James Monroe, died on July 4, 1831, thus becoming the third President in a row who died on the holiday. Calvin Coolidge, the 30th President, was born on July 4, 1872, and, so far, is the only U.S. President to have been born on Independence Day.

graphics-fireworks-495812

Common Customs

Independence Day is a national holiday marked by patriotic displays. Similar to other summer-themed events, Independence Day celebrations often take place outdoors. Independence Day is a federal holiday, so all non-essential federal institutions (like the postal service and federal courts) are closed on that day. Many politicians make it a point on this day to appear at a public event to praise the nation’s heritage, laws, history, society, and people.

Families often celebrate Independence Day by hosting or attending a picnic or barbecue and take advantage of the day off and, in some years, long weekend to gather with relatives. Decorations (e.g., streamers, balloons, and clothing) are generally colored red, white, and blue, the colors of the American flag. Parades are often in the morning, while fireworks displays occur in the evening at such places as parks, fairgrounds, or town squares.

The night before the Fourth was once the focal point of celebrations, marked by raucous gatherings often incorporating bonfires as their centerpiece. In New England, towns competed to build towering pyramids, assembled from barrels and casks. They were lit at nightfall, to usher in the celebration. The highest were in Salem, Massachusetts (on Gallows Hill, the famous site of the execution of 13 women and 6 men for witchcraft in 1692 during the Salem witch trials, where the tradition of bonfires in celebration had persisted), composed of as many as forty tiers of barrels; these are the tallest bonfires ever recorded. The custom flourished in the 19th and 20th centuries, and is still practiced in some New England towns.

Independence Day fireworks are often accompanied by patriotic songs such as the national anthem “The Star-Spangled Banner”, “God Bless America”, “America the Beautiful”, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”, “This Land Is Your Land”, “Stars and Stripes Forever”, and, regionally, “Yankee Doodle” in northeastern states and “Dixie” in southern states. Some of the lyrics recall images of the Revolutionary War or the War of 1812.

While the official observance always falls on July 4, participation levels may vary according to which day of the week the 4th falls on. If the holiday falls in the middle of the week, some fireworks displays and celebrations may take place during the weekend for convenience, again, varying by region.

The first week of July is typically one of the busiest American travel periods of the year, as many people utilize the holiday for extended vacation trips.

july77

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Till tomorrow, my precious family….

Circle Is Open Pictures

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Come To Me Oil

Come To Me Oil



Recipes vary from person to person. They are generally floral in tone and usually red in color. Scents used in such an oil may include sweet pea and narcissus (usually only available as synthetic fragrances, not as essential oils), rose (available as a real essential oil — called otto or attar of roses — but so expensive as to be prohibitively costly for most people, who therefore use a synthetic fragrance instead), rose geranium (a real essential floral oil that has a very good rose scent), and other floral synthetics, such as wistaria, honeysuckle, violet, and the like.

Herbs mixed into in the finished, fragranced oil may include catnip leaf (to entice a lover), saffron stamens (for love-drawing), rose petals, (for love-drawing), Damiana leaf (to increase passion) and/or patchouli leaf (ditto). Queen Elizabeth Root (used to attract men) may be added to the mixture if the person using it is a female.

One difficulty many folk-magicians have with floral scents as a basis for magical perfume oils is that so many of our favorite flowers do not produce a great deal of essential oil.  When this is the case, the oil is very expensive. But that is not the greatest hurdle we must overcome. Some flowers, no matter how lovely they smell, do not produce stable essential oils at all.

Whenever that is the case, essential oils from these flowers are unavailable at any cost and synthetics are the only recourse one has.

The question then becomes one of deciding whether to go with an artificial fragrance that mimics a given floral scent to a greater or lesser degree — or to forgo that scent in favor of one that is available in actual flower-derived form.

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Making Ointments

Making Ointments



When the subject of Witches’ ointments is mentioned, the infamous “flying ointments” immediately come to mind, at least to those with some interest in the history of Witchcraft and magick. These salves, consisting of psychoactive plants steeped in a fatty base, were rubbed onto the skin to aid in what is known today as astral projection.

These are not the only types of ointments known to Witches and magicians, however. Many others have more earthly uses that correlate to those of oils. In fact, any of the oils mentioned in our Oil and Ointment section can be converted to ointments simply by adding them to melted beeswax, lard or (in today’s world) vegetable shortening.

However made, ointments should ideally be kept in crystal or porcelain containers. Realistically, any jars with tight-fitting lids will do fine. Keep ointments away from heat and light. These ointments form a part of herb magic of long-gone days, and so are included here solely for their historical interest.

MAKING OINTMENTS

Ointments are easily made. They consist simply of herbs or oils and a base. In the past, hog’s lard was the preferred base because it was readily available, but vegetable shortening or beeswax produces the best results.

The base must be a greasy substance that melts over heat but is solid at room temperature. Some herbalists actually use dinosaur fat (I.e., Vaseline, which is prepared from petroleum)!

There are two basic ways to create magical ointments.

THE SHORTENING METHOD

Gently heat four parts shortening over low heat until liquefied. Watch that it doesn’t burn. Add one part dried herbal mixture, blend with a wooden spoon until thoroughly mixed, and continue heating until the shortening has extracted the scent. You should be able to smell it in the air. Strain through cheesecloth into a heat-proof container, such as a canning jar. Add one-half teaspoon tincture of benzoin to each pint of ointment as a natural preservative.

Store in a cool, dark place, such as the refrigerator. Ointments should last for weeks or months. Discard any that turn moldy, and lay in a fresh batch.

THE BEESWAX METHOD

This process creates a more cosmetic ointment without a heavy, greasy feeling. It is best to prepare it with oils rather than herbs, as it is difficult to strain. If possible, use unbleached beeswax. If not, use what you can find.

Chip it with a large, sharp knife so that you can pack it into a measuring cup. Place one-fourth cup or so of beeswax in the top of a double boiler (such as a coffee can set into a larger pot of water). Add about one-fourth cup olive, hazelnut, sesame or some other vegetable oil. Stir with a wooden spoon until the wax has melted into the oil.

Remove from the heat and let cool very slightly, until it has just begun to thicken. (This step is taken so that the hot wax won’t evaporate the oils.) Now add the mixed oils to the wax. Stir thoroughly with a wooden spoon and pour into a heat-proof container.

Label and store in the usual way.
In the recipes that follow, the recommended method of preparation will be mentioned.

EMPOWERING OINTMENTS

Once the ointment is made and has cooled in its jar, empower it with its particular magical need.This vital step, remember, directs the energy within the ointment, readying it for your ritual use.

USING OINTMENTS

Ointments are usually rubbed onto the body to effect various magical changes. As with oils, this is done with visualization and with the knowledge that the ointment will do its work.

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Hex-breaker Ointment

HEX-BREAKER OINTMENT



3 parts Galangal

2 parts Ginger root, dried

2 parts Vetivert

1 part Thistle


Steep the herbs in shortening, strain, cool, and anoint the body at night.

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Protection Ointment

Protection Ointment

2 parts Mallow

2 parts Rosemary

1 part Vervain

Make in the usual way with shortening.

Rub onto the body to drive out negative influences and to keep them far from you.

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Psychic Powers Ointment

Psychic Powers Ointment



3 parts Bay

 3 parts Star Anise

2 parts Mugwort

1 part Yerba Santa


Make in the usual way with shortening.


Anoint the temples, middle of the forehead and back of the neck to improve psychic powers.

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Youth Ointment

YOUTH OINTMENT

4 parts Rosemary

2 parts Rose petals
1 part Anise

1 part Fern

1 part Myrtle

Make with shortening.


For preserving or re-attaining youth, stand nude before a full-length mirror at sunrise and lightly anoint your body, visualizing yourself as you would like to be.

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A Quicker Method to Herbal Infused Oils

A Quicker Method to Herbal Infused Oils


Items You Will Need:
2 – 3 oz. dried herbs or 3 – 4 oz. fresh
1 1/4 cups unblended vegetable oil (preferably sunflower or olive)
A heat-proof container with a tight-fitting lid (jam jars work well)

Chop the herb and put it in the container with all the oil. Put the container in a pan filled with water to within 1 inch of the top of the container of oil. Simmer slowly for 2 hours.

After 2 hours, allow the oil to cool, and strain well. Discard the spent herbs (makes lovely compost). Refill the canister with the remaining herbs and return to the water bath (remember to replace the lid). Simmer for another 2 hours. Be sure to check the water level occasionally so as to not burn the oil.

When the oil has cooled enough to work with, pour it through a jelly bag or sieve lined with cheesecloth. If using fresh herbs, there may be a watery liquid at the bottom of the oil.

This must be separated and discarded, or else it will spoil the oil over time. This oil can be used as a base for ointments, creams, or salves, or as a massage oil.

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