September, the Ninth Month of the year of our Goddess, 2015

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“By all these lovely tokens
September days are here,
With summer’s best of weather
And autumn’s best of cheer.”

–  Helen Hunt Jackson, September, 1830-1885

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SEPTEMBER – HARVEST MOON/WINE

September is the ninth month of the year. Its name is derived from the Latin word septum, which means “seventh,” as it was the seventh month of the Roman calendar. Its astrological sign is Virgo, the maiden (August 23 – Septmer 21), a mutable earth sign ruled by Mercury. September is a month of fulfillment. Kitchens are busy, as the garden’s last produce is canned and preserved. The air is filled with the cidery tang of harvest time. Squirrels hide their nuts, and chipmunks line their nests with grain. Asters raise their purple heads, and monarch butterflies add their black-and-orange hues to autumn’s palette. The sacred beverages of the season – cider and wine – echo the colors of nature now. The Fall Equinoxx, or Mabon is the major holiday of September. At Mabon, we celebrate the second harvest, say farewell to summer, and enter the dark season. Days grow shorter as the Great Son, Mabon, returns to Mother Earth. For the Sabbat, altar decorations include pumpkins, squash and grapes. September’s Full Moon is the Harvest Moon, perhaps the most well-known of the year. It rises above the horizon and glows in solitary splendor. She is queen of the September night. The night belongs to her, and to her alone. Honor her by raising a glass of cider or win, then respectfully pour it onto the earth.

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WINE/HARVEST MOON

THE WINE MOON, also known as the harvest moon and singing moon, is the time in the annual cycle when you celebrate and give thanks to the Goddess for a bountiful harvest. As fermented fruit, wine represents the fruits of your labors. Traditionally, the wine is used to toast family and friends, both human and divine.

Wiccan Spell A Night: Spells, Charms, And Potions For The Whole Year
Sirona Knight

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 CORRESPONDENCES FOR SEPTEMBER

NATURE SPIRITS: trooping faeries

HERBS: Copal, fennel, rye, wheat, valerian, skullcap

COLORS: Brown and yellow

FLOWERS: narcissus, lily

SCENTS: storax, mastic, gardenia, bergamot

STONES: peridot, olivine, chrysolite, citrine

TREES: Hazel, larch, bay

ANIMALS: the snake and jackal

BIRDS: Ibis, sparrow

DIETIES: Dementer, Ceres, Isis, Nephthys, Freyja, Thoth

POWERS/ADVICE: A time to rest after the labors of the last two months, a time of balance of the light and dark.
This is also the time to clear up mental clutter and get thoughts back into perspective.

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Symbols & Folklore for the Month of September

September’s Sign of the Zodiac

Virgo (until September 21)
Libra (from September 22 onwards)

September’s Celtic Tree Astrology

Hazel: August 5 – September 1
Vine: September 2 – September 29
Ivy: September 30 – October 27

September’s Birthstones

Sapphire

September’s Birth Flower
Forget-me-not, Morning Glory and Aster


September’s Folklore

Heavy September rains bring drought.

September blow soft, till the fruit’s in the loft.

Married in September’s golden glow, smooth and serene your life will go.

If the storms of September clear off warm, the storms of the following winter will be warm.

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September’s Month Long  Observations

  • Childhood Cancer Awareness Month
  • Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month
  • Leukemia and Lymphoma Awareness Month
  • Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month
  • German American Heritage Month begins on September 15 in the United States.
  • National Ovarian Cancer Month
  • National Preparedness Month (United States)
  • National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month
  • National Bourbon Heritage Month
  • Better Breakfast Month
  • California Wine Month
  • Food Safety Education Month
  • National Chicken Month
  • National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month
  • National Honey Month
  • National Mushroom Month
  • National Papaya Month
  • National Potato Month
  • National Rice Month
  • National Whole Grains Month
  • National Wild Rice Month

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Labor Day – September 7th

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and workers contributions have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Therefore, in 1887, the United States holiday was established in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.

Canada’s Labour Day is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. More than 80 other countries celebrate International Workers’ Day on May 1 as their holiday dedicated to labor.

History Of Labor Day

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York. Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882, after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada. Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike. The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the previous several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent socialist and anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day. All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

Labor Day Celebrations

The form for the celebration of Labor Day was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday: A street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations”, followed by a festival for the workers and their families. This became the pattern for Labor Day celebrations. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the civil significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the Labor movement.

The holiday often marks the end of the traditional summer season (although summer doesn’t officially end until September 21), as students normally return to school the following week, although school year starting days now vary.

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September 11 or 9/11

(Patriots’ Day)

The September 11 attacks (also referred to as September 11, September 11th, or 9/11) were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda on the United States on the morning of Tuesday, September 11, 2001. The attacks consisted of suicide attacks used to target symbolic U.S. landmarks.

Four passenger airliners—which all departed from airports on the U.S. East Coast bound for California—were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists to be flown into buildings. Two of the planes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175, were crashed into the North and South towers, respectively, of the World Trade Center complex in New York City. Within an hour and 42 minutes, both 110-story towers collapsed with debris and the resulting fires causing partial or complete collapse of all other buildings in the World Trade Center complex, including the 47-story 7 World Trade Center tower, as well as significant damage to ten other large surrounding structures. A third plane, American Airlines Flight 77, was crashed into the Pentagon (the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense) in Arlington County, Virginia, leading to a partial collapse in the Pentagon’s western side. The fourth plane, United Airlines Flight 93, initially was steered toward Washington, D.C., but crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania, after its passengers tried to overcome the hijackers. In total, the attacks claimed the lives of 2,996 people (including the 19 hijackers) and caused at least $10 billion in property and infrastructure damage. It was the deadliest incident for firefighters and law enforcement officers in the history of the United States, with 343 and 72 killed respectively.

In the days immediately following the attacks, many memorials and vigils were held around the world, and photographs of the dead and missing were posted around Ground Zero. A witness described being unable to “get away from faces of innocent victims who were killed. Their pictures are everywhere, on phone booths, street lights, walls of subway stations. Everything reminded me of a huge funeral, people quiet and sad, but also very nice. Before, New York gave me a cold feeling; now people were reaching out to help each other.”

One of the first memorials was the Tribute in Light, an installation of 88 searchlights at the footprints of the World Trade Center towers. In New York, the World Trade Center Site Memorial Competition was held to design an appropriate memorial on the site. The winning design, Reflecting Absence, was selected in August 2006, and consists of a pair of reflecting pools in the footprints of the towers, surrounded by a list of the victims’ names in an underground memorial space.

The Pentagon Memorial was completed and opened to the public on the seventh anniversary of the attacks in 2008. It consists of a landscaped park with 184 benches facing the Pentagon. When the Pentagon was repaired in 2001–2002, a private chapel and indoor memorial were included, located at the spot where Flight 77 crashed into the building.

In Shanksville, a permanent Flight 93 National Memorial is planned to include a sculpted grove of trees forming a circle around the crash site, bisected by the plane’s path, while wind chimes will bear the names of the victims. A temporary memorial is located 500 yards (457 m) from the crash site. New York City firefighters donated a cross made of steel from the World Trade Center and mounted on top of a platform shaped like the Pentagon. It was installed outside the firehouse on August 25, 2008. Many other permanent memorials are elsewhere. Scholarships and charities have been established by the victims’ families, and by many other organizations and private figures.

On every anniversary, in New York City, the names of the victims who died there are read out against a background of somber music. The President of the United States attends a memorial service at the Pentagon, and asks Americans to observe Patriot Day with a moment of silence. Smaller services are held in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, which are usually attended by the President’s spouse.

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Mabon – September 21

“In late September, the sun crosses the celestial equator and there is a day where the length of the day and night are approximately equal. These days are called equinoxes, from the Latin meaning “equal night.” The autumnal equinox marks one of the lesser Sabbats, called Mabon, occurring around September twenty-second or twenty-third. Astrologically, this is when the sun moves into Libra. This holiday is the second harvest festival, falling during or at the end of the European grain harvest. It also known as the wine harvest, and often marks the beginning of hunting season. In one old Craft tradition, the fall equinox was named “the Night of the Hunter” and farmers would slaughter livestock too weak to survive the winter on this night.  Druids know this celebration as “Mea’n Fo’mhair” and honor the Green Man, God of the Forest, and his trees with poured offerings of ciders and wine. Norse pagans celebrate this time as Winter Finding, a time period that runs from the Sabbat until October 15th. This night is known as Winter’s Night and is the Norse New Year. The Wiccan New Year is also approaching at October’s end. It is known the ancient Mayans observed this date as well. At the pyramid at Cihickén Itzá, seven triangles of light fall on the pyramid’s staircase on this date only. In Japan, there is a six-day celebration around the equinox. This holiday is to honor Higan-e, the “other shore” and is based on six “perfections”: giving, observance of the precepts, perseverance, effort, meditation and wisdom.  By this time of the year, the days are visibly waning, the temperatures begin to cool and it is time to start preparing for winter. Many people like to refresh their altar(s) for this time, adding elements in autumn colors (orange, brown, gold, dark reds, rust) like acorns, pine cones, leaves, dried plants and herbs, apples, pomegranates, ivy and horns of plenty.”

Some activities of Mabon include:

Select the best of each vegetable, herb, fruit, nut, and other food you have harvested or purchased and give it back to Mother Earth with prayers of thanksgiving.

Hang dried ears of corn around your home in appreciation of the harvest season.

Do meditations and chanting as you store away food for the Winter.

Do a thanksgiving circle, offering thanks as you face each direction – – for home, finances, and physical health (North); for gifts of knowledge (East); for accomplishments in career and hobbies (South); for relationships (West); and for spiritual insights and messages (Center).

Decorate the table with colorful autumn leaves in a basket.

Display the fruits of the harvest – corn, gourds, nuts, grapes, apples – preferably in a cornucopia. Or decorate with wildflowers, acorns, nuts, berries, cocoons, anything that represents the harvest to you.

Make a protection charm of hazelnuts (filberts) strung on red thread.

Make a witch’s broom. Tie dried corn husks or herbs (broom, cedar, fennel, lavender, peppermint, rosemary) around a strong, relatively straight branch of your choice.

Make magic Apple Dolls Gifts of the Harvest can be used to make tools and emblems that will remind us of their bounty all year round.

Look for colored leaves. Collect fallen leaves and make a centerpiece or bouquet for your home. Save the leaves to burn in your Yule fire.

Vist an apple orchard and, if possible, pick your own apples. Hang apples on a tree near your home. Watch the birds and other small animals who will enjoy your gift.

This is also the time for replacing your old broom with a new one. As the broom corn is ripe now, besom making is traditional and magickal this time of year.

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A Little Thought From Me to You…

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Astronomy Picture of the Day – Distant Neutrinos Detected Below Antarctic Ice

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 September 1

Distant Neutrinos Detected Below Antarctic Ice
Image Credit: IceCube Collaboration, U. Wisconsin, NSF

Explanation: From where do these neutrinos come? The IceCube Neutrino Observatory near the South Pole of the Earth has begun to detect nearly invisible particles of very high energy. Although these rarely-interacting neutrinos pass through much of the Earth just before being detected, where they started remains a mystery. Pictured here is IceCube’s Antarctic lab accompanied by a cartoon depicting long strands of detectors frozen into the crystal clear ice below. Candidate origins for these cosmic neutrinos include the violent surroundings of supermassive black holes at the centers of distant galaxies, and tremendous stellar explosions culminating in supernovas and gamma ray bursts far across the universe. As IceCube detects increasingly more high energy neutrinos, correlations with known objects may resolve this cosmic conundrum — or we may never know.

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Your Daily Planet Tracker: Mercury In Libra, Now Until November 1

Planet Tracker

Mercury in Libra

Now Until Nov 1, 2015

 

Mercury, the communication planet, should be feeling comfortable in the sociable air sign of Libra. The air element is very much about the mind and communication, so it fits very nicely with Mercury’s meaning. Libra is about building bridges and overcoming differences. It recognizes that there is more than one side to any question and seeks to harmonize opposing points of view. Diplomacy, then, is likely to be featured at this time, both in the larger public arena and in our personal lives.

Mercury in Libra can soften speech to ensure peaceful relationships. It’s necessary at times to bring down the noise level so that both sides can be heard. This is, therefore, a good time to heal wounds caused by misunderstandings or different views of reality.

The challenge of this period is that the tendency for being nice can sometimes overwhelm the necessity of being truthful. Being kind then becomes a barrier to real communication. Ideally, we can recognize (in Libra’s well-balanced manner) that there are many ways to connect with one another, and that agreement is not the only one. Expressing opposing points of view with respect and openness is a terrific way to strengthen any relationship. It is about being fair enough to yourself and others to both listen and be heard.

Famous folks born with Mercury in Libra include singers Bruce Springsteen, Olivia Newton-John, Cass Elliott, Art Garfunkel and ultra-charming Julio Iglesias. Actors Jeremy Irons, Sigourney Weaver, Christopher Reeves, Richard Harris and Susan Sarandon are part of this group.

Sports stars Doug Flutie, Brett Favre and Scotty Pippen were born with Mercury in Libra, too. Writers Carrie Fisher, Stephen King, Michael Crichton and Ken Kesey have entertained us with their thoughts. David Copperfield has shown sleight of hand, Evel Knievel a crazy kind of courage and Larry Flynt more than we really want to see. Mercury in Libra is also found in the charts of artist Peter Max, comedian-activist Dick Gregory, director Penny Marshall and poet-statesman Vaclav Havel.

 

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The Words of Confucius

The Words of Confucius

He who exercises government by means of his virtue may be compared to the north polar star, which keeps its place and all the stars turn towards it.

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Crack the Cookie

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Your Daily Influences for September 1st

Your Daily Influences
August 23rd, 2015

 

 

The Hierophant
A lover of tradition and ceremony, The Hierphant needs social approval and appreciates the positive aspects of conformity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naudhiz
Naudhiz reversed may tell of needs met and harmonious relationships. Your passions for someone or something may be at their pinnacle.

 

 

 

Pisces the Fishes
This aspect of your life will be strongly influenced by a person who is escapist and idealistic, secretive and vague, weak-willed and easily led. This person probably relies to heavily upon you to make decisions for them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Daily Influences represent events and challenges the current day will present for you. They may represent opportunities you should be ready to seize. Or they may forewarn you of problems you may be able to avoid or lessen. Generally it is best to use them as tips to help you manage your day and nothing more.

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Your Daily Charm for September 1st is Abracadabra

Your Charm for Today

Today’s Meaning:

The most powerful of all talisman indicating you or someone close to you will recover from an infection.

General Description:

One of the most famous of all talismans, and used as a magical formula by the Gnostics in Rome for invoking the aid of beneficent spirits against disease, misfortune and death. Sammonieus, the celebrated Gnostic physician; instructed that the letters of this magical triangle which he used for curing agues and fevers, were to be written on paper, folded into the shape of a cross, worn for nine days suspended from the neck, and, before sunrise, cast behind the patient into a stream running eastward. It was also a most popular charm in the middle ages. During the Great Plague, 1665, great numbers of these amulets were worn as supposed safeguards against infection.

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Your Daily MahJong Tile for September 1 is Bamboo 3, Symbol: Toad

Your Daily Tile
 September 1, 2015

Bamboo 3
Symbol: Toad

The Toad tile indicates some troubling moments along your life’s path, but these aches will heal. It also suggests your ambition may be greater than your reach

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