Daily Archives: April 6, 2012

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for April 6th

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Surely there is nothing so peaceful to the eye as the quiet, soft-hued hills resting in the autumn sun. We think if we could only get to those hills we could walk in the warmth of that sunlight and feel that peace in every nerve and muscle.

But so frequently we are unable to follow our wills. We are forced to sit where we are. And the very thought of being bound to this spot sometimes makes us restless, perhaps beyond reason. It creates a feeling of panic, that life will never be peaceful.

And then we look up into the limitless sky and see the depths and immensity of the universe, and we know that nothing binds us. That is, unless we want to be bound.

If we were to go to those hills, there would be others in the distance that would look as inviting. To hunt for peace outside ourselves is to ever be in search, and so to be bound again. But to loose that infinitely beautiful truth that peace is never there or there – but here, within me.

Most of us are lovers of familiar things. We love the routine of living, the security of knowing what is going to happen at a certain hour on a certain day. We love the knowledge that we will continue to love others even though we may not like what they are doing at the moment. We find great peace in knowing others will continue to love us even when we’ve been foolish.

The exciting and livable life is not always one of being on the go, being in entertaining places. The real life of life is not spangles that glitter and one continual round of gaiety.

Life is contentment, living in depth with a genuine love for work seasoned with recreation and freedom to worship where we choose and to pursue our talents as we please.

English author Samuel Johnson tells us that the fountain of content must spring up in the mind; and they who have so little knowledge of human nature as to see happiness by changing anything but their own dispositions will waste their lives in fruitless efforts.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

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Elder’s Meditation of the Day – April 6

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – April 6

“Everybody should pray together, cheer along, root along. That brings the circle together. Everything is together.”

–Wallace Black Elk, LAKOTA

Life on the Earth can sometimes be very complicated. Sometimes we think we are alone in our problems. Sometime we even withdraw. Then the problems become even more difficult. We need to watch out for one another, to care for one another, to pray together, to encourage one another; and we need to support one another. Behaving in this manner will bring the circle together.

Great Spirit, today, let me support my brothers and sisters.

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April 6 – Daily Feast

April 6 – Daily Feast

These are times when it pays to take a second look – to really pay attention to those things that cross our paths. We may have already missed a wonderful experience by hasty judgment. When quick judgments are made from a limited point of view, the good qualities of anything are hidden. It is essential to look beyond first impressions if we are ever to find a rare jewel. Even Galun lati is helpless to send us blessing if we are dull of spirit and incapacitated by our own smart minds. In our “expert” attitudes, we sometimes allow the very things that would make us peaceful and happy pass by without lifting a hand. Wisdom is being able to see quality in the rough – and then being gentle and patient enough to shape it to perfection.

~ How can we trust you? When Jesus Christ came on earth, you killed him and nailed him to a cross. ~

TECUMSEH 1810

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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Daily Motivator for April 6th – Push yourself forward

Push yourself forward

There are plenty of obstacles that can stand in your way. Don’t be one of them.

Your own thoughts, assumptions and fears can hold you back just as surely as a solid brick wall. And yet, just as you created those self-imposed obstacles, you can let them go.

Instead of fighting against yourself, use the amazing power of your thoughts to more fully enable yourself. Instead of constructing elaborate excuses for avoiding your dreams, just go ahead and let yourself live those dreams.

Yes, life is difficult and challenging, and requires great effort and commitment on your part. Instead of adding to the difficulty with your own negativity, you can choose to enthusiastically transform that difficulty into profound fulfillment.

Remind yourself what a privilege it is to be alive, and to be able to make a difference. Then, focus your awareness on the positive possibilities and do what you do best.

Use your thoughts not to hold yourself back, but to push yourself positively and lovingly forward. Aim the power of your thoughts in a positive, fulfilling direction and your whole life will go in that direction too.

— Ralph Marston

The Daily Motivator

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Crystal of the Day for April 6th – MALACHITE

Crystal of the Day for April 6th

Malachite

Protection, Absorbs Negative Energy, Earth/Devic Energies

Pronunciation: MAL-uh-kite

Also known as:
Primary Chakra: Solar Plexus, Heart, Throat

Astrological sign(s): Scorpio, Capricorn

Vibration: Number 9

Crystal System: Monoclinic

Chemical Composition: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2 Copper Carbonate Hydroxide

Mineral Class: Carbonates

Group:

Hardness: (3.5 – 4)

Color: Banded light to dark Green, Green/Yellow, Green/Black

Location: World wide including Australia, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Congo, Mexico, Namibia, Russia, South Africa, UK, USA

Rarity: Common

Malachite is a stone of abundance as well as purification, healing dreams, and drawing out negative energies. It is a protector, lending balance, healing and positive transformation to the wearer, assisting one in changing situations and providing for the transfer of sacred information leading to spiritual evolution. Malachite assists in clearing and activating all chakras and is quite helpful in the stimulation of the Heart and Throat Chakras. It is a wonderful equalizing and balancing agent. Malachite is said to protect against radiation and has been used in the treatment of asthma, arthritis, swollen joints, broken bones and torn muscles.

Caution: It is not recommended to use this in any type of elixir as it does contain Copper which can be toxic.

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Herb of the Day for April 6th – FRANKINCENSE

Herb of the Day for April 6th

Frankincense

Botanical: Boswellia Thurifera
Family: N.O Burseraceae

—Synonym—Olibanum.
—Part Used—The gum resin.
—Habitat—Arabia, Somaliland.

—Description—Obtained from the leafy forest tree Boswellia Thurifera, with leaves deciduous, alternate towards the tops of branches, unequally pinnated; leaflets in about ten pairs with an odd one opposite, oblong, obtuse, serrated, pubescent, sometimes alternate; petioles short. Flowers, white or pale rose on short pedicels in single axillary racemes shorter than the leaves. Calyx, small five-toothed, persistent; corolla with five obovate-oblong, very patent petals, acute at the base, inserted under the margin of the disk, acstivation slightly imbricative. Stamens, ten, inserted under the disk, alternately shorter; filaments subulate, persistent. Anthers, caducous, oblong. Torus a cupshaped disk, fleshy, larger than calyx, crenulated margin. Ovary, oblong, sessile. Style, one caducous, the length of the stamens; stigma capitate, three-lobed. Fruit capsular, three-angled three-celled, three-valved, septicidal, valves hard. Seeds, solitary in each cell surrounded by a broad membranaceous wing. Cotyledons intricately folded multifid.

The trees on the Somali coast grow, without soil, out of polished marble rocks, to which they are attached by a thick oval mass of substances resembling a mixture of lime and mortar. The young trees furnish the most valuable gum, the older yielding merely a clear, glutinous fluid, resembling coral varnish.

To obtain the Frankincense, a deep, longitudinal incision is made in the trunk of the tree and below it a narrow strip of bark 5 inches in length is peeled off. When the milk-like juice which exudes has hardened by exposure to the air, the incision is deepened. In about three months the resin has attained the required degree of consistency, hardening into yellowish ‘tears.’ The large, clear globules are scraped off into baskets and the inferior quality that has run down the tree is collected separately. The season for gathering lasts from May till the middle of September, when the first shower of rain puts a close to the gathering for that year.

The coast of Southern Arabia is yearly visited by parties of Somalis, who pay the Arabs for the privilege of collecting Frankincense, and in the interior of the country, about the plain of Dhofar, during the southwest Monsoon, Frankincense and other gums are gathered by the Bedouins. (The incense of Dhofar is alluded to by the Portuguese poet, Camoens.)

—Constituents—Resins 65 per cent, volatile oil 6 per cent, water-soluble gum 20 per cent, bassorin 6 to 8 per cent, plant residue 2 to 4 per cent; the resins are composed of boswellic acid and alibanoresin.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—It is stimulant, but seldom used now internally, though formerly was in great repute . Pliny mentions it as an antidote to hemlock. Avicenna (tenth century) recommends it for tumours, ulcers, vomiting, dysentery and fevers. In China it is used for leprosy.

Its principal use now is in the manufacture of incense and pastilles. It is also used in plasters and might be substituted for Balsam of Peru or Balsam or Tolu. The inhalation of steam laden with the volatile portion of the drug is said to relieve bronchitis and laryngitis.

The ceremonial incense of the Jews was compounded of four ‘sweet scents,’ of which pure Frankincense was one, pounded together in equal proportion. It is frequently mentioned in the Pentateuch. Pure Frankincense formed part of the meet offering and was also presented with the shew-bread every Sabbath day. With other spices, it was stored in a great chamber of the House of God at Jerusalem.

According to Herodotus, Frankincense to the amount of 1,000 talents weight was offered every year, during the feast of Bel, on the great altar of his temple in Babylon. The religious use of incense was as common in ancient Persia as in Babylon and Assyria. Herodotus states that the Arabs brought every year to Darius as tribute 1,000 talents of Frankincense, and the modern Parsis of Western India still preserve the ritual of incense.

Frankincense, though the most common, never became the only kind of incense offered to the gods among the Greeks. According to Pliny, it was not sacrificially employed in Trojan times. Among the Romans, the use of Frankincense (alluded to as mascula thura by Virgil in the Eclogues) was not confined to religious ceremonials. It was also used on state occasions, and in domestic life.

The kohl, or black powder with which the Egyptian women paint their eyelids, is made of charred Frankincense, or other odoriferous resin mixed with Frankincense. Frankincense is also melted to make a depilatory, and it is made into a paste with other ingredients to perfume the hands. A similar practice is described by Herodotus as having been practiced by the women of Scythia and is alluded to in Judith x. 3 and 4. In cold weather, the Egyptians warm their rooms with a brazier whereon incense is burnt, Frankincense, Benzoin and Aloe wood being chiefly used for the purpose.

The word ‘incense,’ meaning originally the aroma given off with the smoke of any odoriferous substance when burnt, has been gradually restricted almost exclusively to Frankincense, which has always been obtainable in Europe in greater quantity than any other of the aromatics imported from the East.

There is no fixed formula for the incense now used in the Christian churches of Europe, but it is recommended that Frankincense should enter as largely as possible intoits composition. In Rome, Olibanum alone is employed: in the Russian church, Benzoin is chiefly employed.

The following is a formula for an incense used in the Roman Church: Olibanum, 10 OZ. Benzoin, 4 oz. Storax, 1 OZ. Break into small pieces and mix.

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Deity of the Day for April 6th – ODIN

Deity of the Day for April 6th

Odin

by Micha F. Lindemans
 
The chief divinity of the Norse pantheon, the foremost of the Aesir. Odin is a son of Bor and Bestla. He is called Alfadir, Allfather, for he is indeed father of the gods. With Frigg he is the father of Balder, Hod, and Hermod. He fathered Thor on the goddess Jord; and the giantess Grid became the mother of Vidar. 

Odin is a god of war and death, but also the god of poetry and wisdom. He hung for nine days, pierced by his own spear, on the world tree. Here he learned nine powerful songs, and eighteen runes. Odin can make the dead speak to question the wisest amongst them. His hall in Asgard is Valaskjalf (“shelf of the slain”) where his throne Hlidskjalf is located. From this throne he observes all that happens in the nine worlds. The tidings are brought to him by his two raven Huginn and Muninn. He also resides in Valhalla, where the slain warriors are taken.

Odin’s attributes are the spear Gungnir, which never misses its target, the ring Draupnir, from which every ninth night eight new rings appear, and his eight-footed steed Sleipnir. He is accompanied by the wolves Freki and Geri, to whom he gives his food for he himself consumes nothing but wine. Odin has only one eye, which blazes like the sun. His other eye he traded for a drink from the Well of Wisdom, and gained immense knowledge. On the day of the final battle, Odin will be killed by the wolf Fenrir.

He is also called Othinn, Wodan and Wotan. Some of the aliases he uses to travel icognito among mortals are Vak and Valtam. Wednesday is named after him (Wodan).

Old Norse: Odínn

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Kozy Kitty of the Day for April 6th

Piper, the Cat of the Day
Name: Piper
Age: One year old
Gender: Female
Kind: Seal Point Siamese
Home: Maryland, USA
Iam Piper and I came to live with Mom, Dad and big brother Goose on January 1, 2011 from the Siamese Cat Rescue Center. I am mostly Siamese except I have one paw that has two white toes. I also have a tiny chirping voice which I rarely use. I really do run the house although I am tiny (at seven pounds), and I am scared of every noise and anything that comes through the front door. I am even afraid of my dad when he comes home from work until he says “Hi Piper!” and then I remember it is Dad. Cameras are another thing I dislike.

I like to fetch my toys so mom will “play throw the toy” for me. She will play until I stop bringing my toys to her. Goose likes to pounce on me but I let him have it. Otherwise, we are good friends. I do funny things like jumping in the air and twisting for no reason except to say “I want to play!” I’m still pretty much a kitten and do not like Mom and Dad to sleep later than 4:30 am. Goose and I insist on being fed then. I’ve taught Goose how to walk on Mom and Dad while they are sleeping if they haven’t gotten up to feed us on time. Goose and I have a pretty good life. We have a view of the Chesapeake Bay which brings in all sorts of birds we watch from the safety of our screened-in porch. In the summer, we love to stay out there all day. My mom and dad are very happy the SCRC brought me to them.

Piper, the Cat of the Day
Piper, the Cat of the Day

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