Monthly Archives: March 2012

EGYPTIAN LOVE INCENSE

EGYPTIAN LOVE INCENSE

1/2 oz Benzoin
1/2 oz Cinnamon
1/2 oz Galangal
1/2 oz Frankincense
1 oz Myrrh
3 drops honey
3 drops lotus oil
1 drop rose oil
Pinch of dried Orris root

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EGYPTIAN INCENSE

EGYPTIAN INCENSE

4 parts Frankincense
3 Parts Gum Arabic
2 parts Myrrh
1 Part Cedar
1 Part Juniper
1 part Calamus
1 part Cinnamon

Burn during Egyptian rituals, or to honor any ancient Egyptian deity, such as Isis, Thoth, etc.

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EARTH INCENSE (Planetary)

EARTH INCENSE (Planetary)

1 part Pine needles
1 Part Thyme
few drops Patchouly oil

Burn to honor the Earth, and for all earth-revering rituals.

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EARTH INCENSE

EARTH INCENSE

2 parts pine resin or needles
1 part patchouly
1 pinch finely powdered salt
a few drops cypress oil

Burn for invoking the powers of the element of earth for money, stability, etc.

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DREAM INCENSE

DREAM INCENSE

2 Parts Sandalwood
1 Part Rose petals 1 Part Camphor
few drops Tuberose bouquet
few drops Jasmine oil

Burn a bit in the bedroom prior to sleep to produce psychic dreams. Remove the censer from the room before retiring. Use only genuine camphor.

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NON-COMBUSTIBLE INCENSE

NON-COMBUSTIBLE INCENSE
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Be sure you have all necessary ingredients. If you lack any, decide on
substitutions.

Each ingredient must be finely ground, preferably to a powder, using either a
mortar and pestle or an electric grinder. Some resins won’t powder easily, but
with practice you’ll find the right touch. When I first worked with herbs I
couldn’t powder frankincense. It kept on gumming to the sides of the mortar and
to the tip of the pestle. After a while I stopped fighting it (and cursing it,
I’ll admit-not a good thing to do with herbs used in incenses) and got into the
flow of the work. The frankincense came out just fine.

When all is ready, fix your mind on the incense’s goal-protection, love, health.
In a large wooden or ceramic bowl, mix the resins and gums together with your
hands. While mingling these fragrant substances, also mix their energies.
Visualize your personal power-vibrating with your magical goal-exiting your
hands and entering the incense. It is this that makes homemade incense more
effective than its commercial counterparts.

Next, mix in all the powdered leaves, barks, flowers and roots. As you mix,
continue to visualize or concentrate on the incense’s goal.

Now add any oils or liquids (wine, honey, etc.) that are included in the recipe.
Just a few drops are usually sufficient. On the subject of oils: If there’s a
sufficient amount of dry ingredients in the recipe, you can substitute an oil
for an herb you lack. Simply ensure that the oil an essential oil, for
synthetics smell like burning plastic when smoldered.

Once all has been thoroughly mixed, add any powdered gem-stones or other power
boosters. A few-not many-of the recipes in this book call for a pinch of
powdered stone.

To produce this, simply take a small stone of the required type and pound it in
a metal mortar and pestle (or simply smash it with a hammer against a hard
surface). Grind the resulting pieces into a powder and add no more than the
scantiest pinch to the incense.

One general power-boosting “stone” is amber. A pinch of this fossilized resin
added to any mixture will increase its effectiveness, but this can be rather
expensive.

The incense is now fully compounded. Empower the incense and it is done. Store
in a tightly capped jar. Label carefully, including the name of the incense and
date of composition. It is ready for use when needed.

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RULES OF COMBUSTIBLE INCENSE COMPOSITION

RULES OF COMBUSTIBLE INCENSE COMPOSITION

by
Scott Cunningham
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Here are some guidelines to follow when compounding combustible incense. These
are for use with the Cone Incense Base #2 recipe above. If they aren’t followed,
the incense won’t properly burn. There’s less room for experimentation here than
with non-combustible incenses.

* First off, never use more than ten percent saltpeter. Ever!

* Also, keep woods (such as sandalwood, wood aloe, cedar, juniper and pine) and
gum resins (frankincense, myrrh, benzoin, copal) in the proper proportions: at
least twice as much powdered wood as resins. If there’s more resinous matter,
the mixture won’t burn.

* Naturally, depending on the type of incense you’re adding to the base, you may
have to juggle some proportions accordingly. Simply ensure that frankincense and
its kin never constitute more than one-third of the final mixture, and all
should be well.

* Though this hasn’t covered all aspects of combustible incense making (that
could be a book in itself), it should provide you with enough guidelines to make
your own. Experiment, but keep these rules in mind.

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How to Make and Use Your Own Incense

How to Make and Use Your Own Incense

By Patti Wigington, About.com

Smoke in the Sky:

For thousands of years, people have used fragrant flowers, plants, and herbs as incense. Using smoke to send prayers out to the gods is one of the oldest known forms of ceremony. From the censers of the Catholic church to the Pagan bonfire rituals,

incense is a powerful way to let your intent be known. You can make your own quite easily, using a blend of herbs, flowers, wood bark, resins, and berries. Most of these are items you can grow yourself, find in the woods, or purchase inexpensively.

Why Incense?:

Incense — and other fragrant items, such as oils and perfumes — work on a couple of different levels. The first is the effect on your mood — a certain scent will trigger a particular emotion. Aromatherapists have known for years that smells affect different parts of the senses. Secondly, an aroma may have various associations. You may be walking through a store, catch a whiff of Chantilly, and suddenly be reminded of your grandmother who passed away when you were away at college. The smell of a particular food may evoke memories of the summer you spent at camp.

Finally, we experience scents on a vibrational level. Every living being has energy, and emits its own vibration – plants are no different. When you blend them into incense, these vibrations change in accordance with your intent. This is why, in magic, incense is so popular — in addition to making your ritual space smell nice, you are able to change the vibration in the atmosphere, effecting change in the universe.

Why Make Your Own?:

You can buy commercially produced incense sticks and cones just about anywhere, and they’re not that expensive. However, they’re made with synthetic ingredients, and therefore have little to no magical value. While they’re nice to burn, and certainly smell lovely, they serve little purpose in a ritual setting.

Burning Your Incense:

Loose incense, which is what the recipes on these pages are for, is burned on a charcoal disc or tossed into a fire. The charcoal discs are sold in packages by most Wiccan supply shops, as well as church supply stores (if you have a Hispanic Marketa near you, that’s a good place to look too). Apply a match to the disc, and you’ll know it’s lit when it begins to spark and glow red. After it’s glowing, place a pinch of your loose incense on the top — and make sure you’ve got it on a fireproof surface. If you’re holding your ceremony outside with large fire, simply toss handfuls into the flames.

How to Read the Recipes:

Any good cook knows that the first step is to always gather your goodies together. Collect your ingredients, your mixing and measuring spoons, jars and lids, labels (don’t forget a pen to write with), and your mortar and pestle.

Each incense recipe is presented in “parts.” This means that whatever unit of measurement you’re using — a cup, a tablespoon, a handful — is one part. If a recipe calls for two parts, use two cups. One half part is a half cup, if you’re using a cup to measure, or half a tablespoon if you’re using a tablespoon.

When making your own incense, if you’re using resins or essential oils, combine these first. Use your mortar and pestle to mash these until they get a bit gummy, before you add any bark or berries. Dried herbs, flowers, or powdery items should go in last.

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