Daily Archives: December 6, 2011

An Urban Pagan Manifesto (A Rant)

An Urban Pagan Manifesto (A Rant)

Author: Ruadhan J McElroy

Now I want to make it quite clear that I have nothing against people who get most of their spiritual experiences from nature or the wilderness. I think the Nichols’ Arboretum here in Ann Arbor, Michigan is a great place to take a walk, and as a Hellenic Polytheist I’ve really felt some “nymph presence” there on more than one occasion. Trees are great, as are flowers and open fields and rolling hills.

…but that’s not all that paganism is about. Trust me.

Let us take a moment to look at the etymology of the word “Pagan” for a moment: The English-language word “Pagan” is from the Latin root “paganus” which is often translated as meaning “country dweller.” Now I’ve seen some debate (usually in on-line forums) as to where the original pejorative context of “paganus” began. So far, the argument that seems to hold the most water is that it was pretty much synonymous with “mundane”, “civilian” and “hillbilly” at various points in its history.

In ancient polytheistic Rome, the “paganus” were people who lived in rural areas, generally closer to nature than those who lived in the ancient and considerably high-tech Roman cities. When Rome became Christian, the “paganus” were those who clung to the old “nature spirit” traditions out in rural areas, though it quickly became a term that was synonymous with a pejorative use of “civilian” as it came to mean anybody who was not a part of the Holy Roman army.

Now, over time, the relationship of the word “Pagan” to Christianity came to include anybody who followed a spiritual path that was non-inclusive of the God of Abraham, though typically (and for a long time) the term has generally been reserved to those whose spirituality has been linked to European pre-Christian faiths as well as Atheism and Agnosticism.

While nowadays it’s relatively common to see people refer to Hinduism and Shinto and even Buddhism as “Pagan” spiritual paths, and Atheism and Agnosticism are recognized as being distinctly different from Paganism, I’m going to stick with more traditional use.

Over time, let’s say from the crusades to the pre-Victorian, it came to be that anybody who was distinctly non-Christian and non-Jewish (at one time, Moslems were commonly referred to as “Pagan” by Christians) was called a “Pagan” – be they Atheistic or Agnostic or actually “Pagan” (as we may know it these days).

Some “Pagan” traditions even survived through Catholicism in Ireland, where the church had come to incorporate ancient rituals and deities into Catholicism as prayers and saints (furthermore, there was almost nothing in the way of witch-trials in Ireland) and in rural areas of Greece (where there were absolutely NO witch trials – the Greek Orthodox church has always been skeptical of sorcery, but when the France and Germany were having a collective cow, the Greeks pretty much just didn’t want to get involved) .

Now enter the mid-Victorian and the William Morris school of back-to-nature Romanticism of the “ancient Pagan ways” where everybody who was really spiritual way back then, before industrialization, was living in some simple house out in the woods — and through this Romanticism, cities became the antithesis of spiritual growth. There was a lot of anti-Industrialist sentiment in the Nineteenth Century, and this shows in a lot of the literature of the time.

It therefore makes sense that in that socio-political climate, the idea that “rural” people were somehow more spiritually aware would be well-accepted as fact, no matter what times those rural people depicted actually lived in – it could prove especially popular if those people were ancients and there was no way to back these facts up, since they’re all long-dead at the time of writing, and very few people had access to ancient texts.

Now in this day and age, “Pagan” has become a catch-all term for just about any spiritual person whose spirituality has no connections to the Abrahamic faiths. It’s still considerably rare to see it applied to Hinduism, Tao, Shinto, Buddhism or any other “Far East” spiritual paths, Native American/First Nations/Inuit spirituality or Australian Aboriginal spirituality, and I have never seen it applied to Zoroastrianism but in general, it’s become rather accepted that “Paganism” is more-or-less synonymous with non-Christian beliefs, often of European extraction.

This means it is applied not only to Ancient [Culture] Polytheism Reconstructionist faiths and “new” faiths more loosely based on ancient European polytheism (such as Wicca and Feri), but also to very loosely defined “nature-based” spirituality.

Now there is little, and dubious at best, evidence that ancient polytheists were any more “nature-based” than any other religious paths that have existed since. Indeed, it could be argued that the Amish are a “nature based” Christian sect (or at least “primitivist, ” when compared to the immense sprawling urban Catholic cathedrals), as the Amish have a great respect for the natural world, teach their children knowledge of sustainable crops, “live off the land” and are comparatively more self-sufficient than most of the Pagans who I personally know.

Still, I’ve encountered a high rate of pomposity amongst undoubtedly modern Pagans who continue to self-delude themselves into believing that “Paganism” and “nature-based spirituality” are somehow one-in-the-same. The two concepts are not synonymous, nor was the “Paganism” (as defined by Random House, def 1: one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks) of the ancients any more nature-based then than now.

There were polytheistic city-dwellers whose primary practices were based in urban temples and their own modern (for their time) houses and apartments; they took part in regular festivals to certain deities that were sometimes held out in the woods, but to an ancient urban-dweller, there is no evidence nor any other reasons to believe that their day-to-day religious practices were any more “nature-based” than ours.

And that which we do know of the religious and spiritual practices of the paganus doesn’t show any exceptional reverence toward nature nor any tendencies to gravitate toward “nature-based” deities more than others – in fact, there is evidence that rituals to Apollon (for example) survived longer amongst rural peoples, but He is also a God of Civilization, credited with bringing Man music and literature, he was one of the Gods honored in the theatre and gymnasia (two things you would have had a hard time finding in ancient rural Greece and Rome, but at the same time, in the cities, theatre and gymnasia proved quite popular, and this is where those institutions flourished) .

Does He have His rural and agrarian aspects? Of course you would be hard-pressed to find a member of the Greek pantheon who isn’t at least somewhat important to both urban and rural life.

But to continue spreading the modern-day fallacy of the “ancient nature-based religions” does a disservice to the Pagan community at large.

While it is perfectly acceptable for modern people to find their spirituality in a manner that gives reverence, even an exceptional reverence to the “natural world, ” the dominance of and stress on “nature-based spirituality” in the modern Pagan community can, in fact, turn away many people who feel otherwise called to a polytheistic or rather, a distinctly Pagan spiritual path. Not everybody needs to give an exceptional amount of reverence to nature to be “Pagan” – in fact, the ancient Pagan Romans and Greeks were more than just the paganus — in fact, they built some of the most intricate and well-designed cities that the world has ever seen, and which we moderns still marvel over. And there is no reason to believe that those who lived and worshipped in cities were any less devout than those who maintained more humble dwellings and existences in the countryside.

The modern paganus have their place in our community, but in English, the word “Pagan” has become so much more complex than its Latin root, and that word, Pagan, has come to include a broad spectrum of non-Abrahamic spirituality. I don’t think of one kind of person when I think of “Pagans” – I think of rural moderns who grow their own herbs and grind all of their own spices with mortar and pestle and often dress in patchwork “Gypsy” skirts and peasant blouses who simply honor “Mother Earth”, I think of eclectic suburban Midwestern Wiccans who have the best of the countryside right out their back door and live less than a ten minute drive from a bustling city that gives them so many options at building a true community, and I think of modern urban ecstatic Dionysian performance artists playing the Pan flute in galleries and on busy boulevards.

I also think of Apollonian concert cellists and novelists. I think of ceremonial magicians living in a converted warehouse loft where they also hold ritual. I think of Dianics who give lectures at universities and distribute self-published newsletters from their tiny Manhattan efficiencies and write regular columns for Ms. And Bitch magazines. I think of Fiona Horne in Los Angeles, I think of the band MT-TV from London, and I think of Faith and the Muse, who are from Los Angeles and Washington D.C. respectively, and are currently based in Hollywood, California.

And ultimately, I think of myself: an artist, musician and writer born and raised in metro-Detroit; a modern ecstatic mystic Hellenic Pagan, working with quasi-Reconstructionist principles, who has designated himself a cultist to Apollon, Hermes, Dionysos, Eros, Pan (yes, Pan!) and Hecate (and not to mention possibly the only person in Michigan with a shrine to Narkissos), who has a place in his kitchen with offerings for Hestia, Zeus and Demeter and a hand-painted caduceus to Hermes (appropriately) on his messenger-bag; who maintains wall-shrines to the Dawn, Sun, Moon and Stars, Seasons and Days; and who will never cease being amused at the exclamations made by friends and acquaintances of “oh my, I never would have guessed that you were a Pagan! You’re just so involved in city life!”

About these ads
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Leave a comment

Who Inherits Your Knowledge?

Who Inherits Your Knowledge?

Author: Lady GoldenRaven

Here is a thought: For us older wytchs, have you ever thought about who you will pass down your wytchy items to when your time comes to cross over? By the time we hit our “golden years”, most of us have amassed a rather large collection of books, articles, herbs, oils, etc. So where does it go?

We have thought about how we divide up the money we leave for our children, which one gets the house and this one gets the car. But, has anyone given thought to the wealth of knowledge we have put into our Book of Shadows?

Who gets the special oils you created? What becomes of the beautiful staff and wand we created with our own hands?

Do we leave our sacred Book of Shadows to our covens?

Is there a special child or friend who will use this information wisely and keep its secrets to themselves?

Has anyone thought of donating them to the military or some other organization?

Will they find their rightful owners or will they end up in the trash or floating around space with all the missing socks.

As I approach my Crone years and since I have taught many students in the ways of the Wise, I have often thought about leaving my stuff to one of them. However, several of my students have been online. It would be hard to leave my trusted Book of Shadows to any of them, since I have only had little contact with them. So, that leaves the students I taught in person, who are now either in my coven or have moved on.

However, I am lucky. I recently met a woman who is 25 years old. She and I have become really close friends. She had several pagan friends (who are also my friends) who had taught her a little bit about their path.

She calls me Mama Beth, since I am older and she can talk to me about things one cannot talk to about with her real parents. Since I have no children of my own, she is now my adopted daughter. She is serious about her learning of the craft, so I am now teaching her my ways.

I thought long and hard about whom would be heir to my wytchy fortune. I do not own a home, so all I have to pass along is my wytchy stuff, my Led Zeppelin/Robert Plant collection, and my car.

All that has been decided. And now, I have made my decision as to where my Book of Shadows and the rest of my stuff shall go. My daughter shall be heir to all I have in my Wytchy World. I have such a huge collection of books on the subject that is would fill two walls!

I started thinking about this when a friend of mine nearly died a few months ago in a terrible accident. I put much thought and many hours of thought into this decision. Once I decided, I made my intentions clear.

When I told Debbie of my decision, I thought she would never stop crying. She was happy yet sad. It was something she did not want to think about.

Well, nobody wants to think about such things, but you must. She is the only one allowed to even touch my Book of Shadows, let alone look in it to read from it. She has come over for her lessons on time every time. She is learning the Craft well. Most of all–I TRUST HER.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I surely do not want my Book of Shadows, which I spent many hours working on, ending up in a dumpster somewhere. I wrote every word in that book in calligraphy. If anything, it is a piece of art. For one, I have the fortune of having bought a grand Book of Shadows from a great company called Brahm’s Bookworks (link enclosed at the end), which is like the one you see on the show Charmed. Mine weighs over 30 pounds. Now you see why I do not want it simply dumped in the trash.

Who do I know who would appreciate this? My daughter!

Where will the hundreds of jars of herbs end up? Herbs that I lovingly planted, nurtured, and harvested. I have many bottles of oils which I have made, not to mention the holistic medicines I have made from all the above.

My staff, which I lovingly hand picked, designed by me for me, blessed and consecrated and has become a part of me, I do not want to end up in a burn pile somewhere as trash. If, my daughter chooses to burn it in memory of me so that none can use my “magickal” staff, then so be it.

A few of my friends may end up with a few things–some of the herbs and oils and such. My stones and all I promised to a friend who also makes jewelry. So he can use what he wants for wytchy works and pick what he needs for jewelry.

Of course, some things, I can leave to the world via the net. Some of this I have accomplished already. But face it, out in the world of Cyberspace, one cannot be too sure of who they are dealing with. A lot of my stuff is found and will be found as I continue, on Pathways Seminary.

But, I thought I would offer up this little essay as a reminder to all not to forget about whom you will leave your most precious Wytchy wears to. Since the baby boomers are now into their Crone years or close to it as I am, there are a lot of us pagans who belong to this age group.

So while you are sitting there, making out your wills, reserve space and time to have it in writing, to whom you are passing down your religious and magickal items to. I know, whomever ends up with them shall appreciate both the deep thought you put into giving it to them, as well as appreciating the work you did, and all the knowledge contained within these items.

I am happy that I know where my knowledge is going to be used and appreciated.

Thank you,
LadyGoldenraven



Footnotes:
Link to Book of Shadows: http://www.brahmsbookworks.com/id2.html

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Leave a comment

In Defense of the Practice of Magic

In Defense of the Practice of Magic

Author: Lupa

You don’t have to practice magic to be a good pagan. In fact, you can theoretically go your entire life without casting a spell or performing a magical rite.

However, over the years I’ve seen a recurrence in the idea that not practicing magic is the superior decision. The general attitude seems to be somewhere along the lines of “I don’t practice magic—I just use mundane solutions instead of wasting my time!” A variation on this is “You’re not supposed to work magic for mundane and/or selfish purposes”. And there’s even “Don’t work magic when you don’t need to—you don’t want to overburden the gods!” I’ve also heard the sentiment that “Magic is a crutch, and if you think you need it then you’re too dependent on it”.

I would imagine that the roots of these attitudes are embedded in the fact that when some newbies to paganism are first getting started, they’re totally enamored of the idea of casting spells and whatnot. They get the idea that magic can solve all of their problems, and so dive right in. For them, religion is something they learn about later, only after the shiny newness of “I’m a witch!” wears off, and they get a little better idea of what paganism is about besides magic.

Since this is so common among newcomers, I would guess that at least some people who exhibit anti-magic attitudes are doing so in order to seem more experienced and mature. It resembles, in my mind, the child who puts his/her toys aside in an attempt to seem more grown-up.

This isn’t to say that everyone who doesn’t practice magic is just posturing. However, I’d like to address the attitudes that I’ve mentioned.

–I don’t practice magic—I just use mundane solutions instead of wasting my time

Okay, admittedly you don’t want to only use magic to get something done in this world. The clichéd example is the job seeker who casts a spell but then doesn’t go out and job hunt, instead waiting for work to miraculously fall into his/her lap. However, magic is a tool that can be used to augment mundane actions.

A well-executed ritual can increase the probability of success in mundane affairs. Don’t view the magic as something separate from your “real world” efforts; rather, see them all as complementary to each other.

Magic isn’t some detached, spooky force with no bearing on physical reality. Rather, it’s a practice that involves seemingly casual events joined together to create change. Whether you see this as manipulating invisible energies, asking for help from the Divine, or simply changing your psychological outlook on a particular issue, it has just as much relevance to everyday life as any mundane activities.

The methods and mechanics of magic may not be as obvious or as widely accepted, but I don’t see them as being superior or inferior to mundane actions.

– You’re not supposed to work magic for mundane and/or selfish purposes

I’m not sure where this one came from. If you look at magic throughout history, it has primarily been used for everyday issues affecting the individual. Whether that individual worked the magic him/herself or asked someone else to do so, practical magic for common problems has been prevalent for quite some time.

A study of folklore, witchcraft and related topics throughout history shows an abundance of spells and charms for love, money, health and other such concerns. While there’s also been plenty of magic designed to help the individual ascend to higher planes of reality, there’s no denying the strong interest in cultures around the world in using magic to make this reality better to live in.

And that includes “selfish” magic.

If you have a headache, you take a painkiller of some sort. If you need money, you find a better job or take out a loan. If you’re lonely, you find people to hang out with. What’s wrong with using magic to augment these things? The “no selfish magic” idea strikes me as rather Puritanical, not to mention incredibly impractical.

I’m assuming that if you’re not supposed to do magic for yourself, you instead work it for others. How are you supposed to help other people if your life is a mess? Would you get financial advice from a broker who was declaring bankruptcy? How about relationship advice from someone who’s been through eight divorces in ten years?

No one has ever been able to give me a solid reason why it’s such a bad thing to work magic on my own behalf; people who are going to be selfish to the point of harming others are going to be that way regardless of whether they have access to magic or not.

I also don’t fool myself into thinking that denying myself automatically makes me a more virtuous person. Personally, if I’m going to make the conscious effort to improve my life, I’m going to use every tool at my disposal, which includes magic. Which brings me to the final point I’d like to address…

– Don’t work magic when you don’t need to—you don’t want to overburden the gods

For some people, magic is inextricably bound to spirituality. When they cast a spell or otherwise work magic, they expect that some deity or spirit is going to make the magic work for them. With such a belief, I can see why they might want to avoid asking too much of the entities they work with. Granted, it’s quite possible for someone of a dependent nature to get to the point where s/he feels that s/he can’t do anything without divine intervention, but this is an extreme case.

Magic doesn’t have to involve deities and spirits if you don’t want it to. We’re quite capable of working magic by our own wills. If you’re that concerned that you’re asking too much of your deities, then just do the work yourself.

I’ve found, from my own experience, that the spirits I work with the most (totem animals in particular) actually appreciate it when I put forth the effort myself to the best of my ability. They know that if I do call on them for help, it’s because I really need it. “The Gods help those who help themselves”.

– Magic is a crutch, and if you think you need it then you’re too dependent on it

Anything can be a crutch if you allow it to be. Yes, there are the people who think that magic alone will solve any problems they have (even though they continue to have those same problems). However, this shouldn’t be taken as proof that magic itself is more likely to become a crutch than, say, religious fundamentalism.

I’ve known pagans who allowed their spiritual beliefs to completely take over their lives (without the practice of magic, mind you). People can get obsessed about literally anything; it doesn’t necessarily mean that what they’re obsessed over is what’s at fault.

Those of who practice magic on a regular basis aren’t necessarily obsessed. I practice magic because it’s beneficial, and because I really enjoy the experience. I can act quite well without it; I don’t cast a spell for every single thing in my day. But it’s an effective method of furthering my actions, and I use it when I think it’s warranted. If I find that it’s warranted on a regular basis, that doesn’t make me obsessed. It just makes me a magician.

In the end, it’s a personal choice. If you don’t want to work magic, that’s fine. Nobody’s forcing you. And for some people, it’s just not a necessary part of their lives. However, I really recommend against looking down on those of us who do work magic on a regular basis.

I’ve been able to use it to improve my life (along with mundane actions) in numerous ways, and intend to continue to do so. I believe that there’s absolutely no reason I shouldn’t be allowed to be happy, and I certainly don’t think it’s selfish to want that.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Leave a comment

A Family Struggle With a Fallen Witch

A Family Struggle With a Fallen Witch

Author: Lady Sindy Aine

I am a 5th generation Witch. I have a bloodline inside of me that derives from Witches as far back as my Great-Great Grandmother. As far as we know, it could go back further I really don’t know the trail gets a little obscured in Italy where my family line comes from.

Having a firm grip on ritual and celebrations we also have a darker side of the family, not being able to give names nor would I want to but I would have to say the power of a determined Witch is unmatchable, very frightening as well.

Do you believe that from a very old family that such negativity could linger through the bloodlines not affecting all of us but enough to cause much anguish? How does one deal with the fall of a family member whom was brought up with all the same beliefs and structure… knowing all that we know, not allowing any room for mistakes that would show a disregard for what we are, what we stand for, or allow?

The subject of a fallen Witch is the pinnacle of what our family now refers to as a disgrace. Over the years, I have seen the damage that negative energies can do, not in such a direct way as when I looked into this person’s eye and saw such contempt for what is good and right in nature and life with such a disregard and hollowness that eludes me to this day.

As an old family of Witches, we know the horrible consequences of these actions. We have seen them firsthand and even with that, no warnings, no obvious signs, or even actual three-fold rules come to light to affect this person. Nothing has made these actions come to a stop. How do the negative energies engulf someone so fully? How does the purity of this beautiful harmonic natural religion fall victim to such darkness?

It is out there, it is seductive, and it is horrifying.

We all know for a fact that the yin and the yang have to exist, but that they have to exist in your own family makes it so much harder to grasp. I know this seems like a fairytale with a wicked Witch. I assure you, no one else can be appreciative of this accept for people of similar knowledge.

I feel an obligation to bring some attention to the other side that we all know too well exists. I would normally live and let live, however we are faced with this in a very personal way that allows me to convey to you that it hurts to watch someone empower themselves in this way.

I know some dabble in this area hoping for something powerful and I see how it is enticing but do they see what the consequences can be? And what if anything can one family do?

Much like an intervention for an addict in your family we have attempted discussions. This is an incredibly difficult situation. This person knows what is right and chooses to continue on this path. I fear for everyone involved. Never have I tried so hard to bring enlightenment to one person.

As a family, we have cast circles in complete dedication to this cause and still nothing. We have tried to dispel all negativity and sought our elders for guidance — again nothing. We are sneered at by this person — laughed at and ridiculed; still we try.

Allowing this to continue is unthinkable. It is eating this person alive like a cancer throughout their entire being. We have been fighting this for many years, not achieving any level of success.

The eldest member of our family, my Grandmother who is in her nineties and still very active in her beliefs has visions, which do not bode well for this person. Her wisdom tells us to allow this. That it is meant to be.

All that we can do as a family is place blessings of protection on this person and all whom may be harmed. We all keep hoping for a much better outcome. Letting go of someone you love is very painful. Not knowing what is going to happen is even more painful.

The simplest offering I have is to allow yourself the right to allow someone else the right to choose their own path without allowing indifference to encompass your being and change your views. Sometimes you have to just let life happen and hope for the best.

“We are no better than anyone else or any other path that is chosen, if all is for the purpose of good we can conquer anything in time, all will right itself”. That is a quote from Grandmother; she is a very wise woman.

I have come to the realization that this is not just a character flaw, but also something much more, very much more. I believe that this is what comes of wading in darker waters and allowing yourself to be immersed by the cold and eventually to drown in the darkness.

We have never stopped reaching out to this person. We all keep trying and we leave ourselves available, but this is a very sad outcome… so unlike a fairytale, there is no happy ending. Not yet anyway.

My hope by writing this is to let others with mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, brothers, sisters or any loved ones who suffer with this know that they are not alone in their struggle.

Feelings of hopelessness are something that we cannot help. But from time to time, we see that the light of protection which surrounds us and we feel empowered to continue on the path we have chosen.

On a positive note, you have to remember that all we have is our inner light and the ability to share that light. Even faced with a certain amount of despair, our light still shines. We still have our positive thoughts and the ability to channel those energies to those who are in need. We can heal. We can enlighten. And we can give offerings to the Goddess.

We know that all is how it is suppose to be.

Hope and Blessings to all from my Family to yours.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Leave a comment

ENLIGHTENED PERSPECTIVE

ENLIGHTENED PERSPECTIVE
by Andy Rooney
I’ve learned….
That the best classroom in the world is at the feet of an elderly person.

That when you’re in love, it shows.

That just one person saying to me, “You’ve made my day!” makes my day.

That having a child fall asleep in your arms is one of the most peaceful feelings in the world.

That being kind is more important than being right.

That you should never say no to a gift from a child.

That I can always pray for someone when I don’t have the strength to help him in some other way.

That no matter how serious your life requires you to be, everyone needs a friend to act goofy with.

That sometimes all a person needs is a hand to hold and a heart to understand.

That simple walks with my father around the block on summer nights when I was a child did wonders for me as an adult.

That life is like a roll of toilet paper. The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.

That we should be glad God doesn’t give us everything we ask for.

That money doesn’t buy class.

That it’s those small daily happenings that make life so spectacular.

Oh My Aging Funny Bone

 

Categories: Daily Posts | Leave a comment

Understanding the Law of Attraction

Understanding the Law of Attraction

By Phylameana lila Desy

You likely know someone who is a great at manifesting. You may even have felt somewhat jealous of that person because it appears they have everything, seemingly getting these things with little effort as if they were born under a lucky star. Well, it may be that they very well were born with the knowledge of manifesting already intact. I say this because I believe once we learn something in another life (Yes, I believe in past lives, parallel existences) it is not lost, and that we can choose to bring those talents with us as we move into a new life experience.

Attracting Abundance is Knowledge

As any other skill people have, manifesting is no different from playing the piano or flipping pancakes in the air. How good you are at it depends on how efficient you have become at performing it. And, although some of us are better at certain skills that doesn’t mean the rest of us, with practice, can’t improve or even surpass the talent expressed by another. Those people who are efficient in attracting have trained their minds to focus on their desires. They have learned it so well that they often times don’t even realize how they do it. Abundance comes to them naturally. They wouldn’t blink an eye if someone suggested they don’t deserve something, it isn’t part of their reality.

Grasping a better understanding of how the “Law of Attraction” works is the first step in bringing abundance into your life.

Law of Attraction

We create our own reality. We attract those things in our life (money, relationships, employment) that we focus on. I wish I could tell you that it is as simple as stating an affirmation, but no affirmation is going to work if your thoughts or feelings are negating the positive.

When we focus on “having less” then we create that experience for ourselves. When we focus on “I hate my job” then we will never notice the aspects of our employment that might be satisfying. Basically, just wanting something isn’t going to bring that to us when we continue to obsess on the not having of that something. All we will experience is “not having” and will be ultimately blocking our true desires.

Better to focus on a particular object or scenario rather than on winnings or cash.

Another mistake that we make is that we tend to think of abundance in terms of how much money we have in our bank accounts. I personally think focusing on winning the lottery is a fruitless event. Focusing on winning the lottery is kind of like focusing on “not having.” I say this because of some discussions I’ve had with those who have held this desire, They have shared what they would do with the winnings if they won. Yet, some of the things they say they would do with the money they could actually already be doing with their current incomes on a smaller scale, but they don’t. Why not? Because they cling to what they perceive as their “meager savings” with the attitude that they don’t have enough out of fear. Here is an example of this:

A man’s mother owns a car that is need of repair. The son says “If I won the lottery I would buy my mother a new car.” But actually, the son has the means to take her car to the mechanics and pay out $400 needed in repairs to assure that his mom has a dependable car to drive back and forth to the market. When asked why he doesn’t then just go ahead and have her current car repaired, he answers, “Well gee, I only have $800 in the bank, and doing that would knock out half my savings. What happens if my car needs repairs next week or my daughter gets sick and needs to see a doctor?”

So you see, the person’s true focus is on “not enough” rather than being focused on winning the lottery. When we are focused on “not enough” it won’t ever matter how much money we have, it will never be enough. Suggesting that he pay for his mother’s car repairs brought his fears out into the open. It would be nice if the fellow could trust that by helping his mother and paying for the repairs he would not put himself at financial risk. But for the time being, while he feels he must hold onto that fear reality, I would suggest this man focus on visualizing his mother driving safely to and from the market in comfort and without experiencing any mechanical breakdowns. This would be a positive image/thought to get that picture to become a reality. Another suggestion would be to introduce the Law of Attraction to his mother so she can start attracting a new car for herself among other things she might desire.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | Leave a comment

What is the Law of Attraction?

What is the Law of Attraction?

Like Attracts Like

By Phylameana lila Desy

The Law of Attraction is one of the better known universal laws. The theory behind the Law of Attraction is that we create our own realities. We attract things we want and we also attract things we don’t want. We attract the people in our lives, the stuff in our homes, and the money in our bank accounts through our thoughts and feelings.

When our beliefs are limited, we attract limited wealth and compromise our well-being. When we believe anything is possible, the sky’s the limit. In fact, you can break through that glass roof on the sky with your miraculous positive thoughts. When we focus on the “lack of” we are creating a less-than reality. But, if focus on being abundant and happy we will enjoy a luxurious and glorious reality.

About The Secret

The Law of Attraction is not a new phenomenon, the theory behind its teachings has been around for ages. The release of the movie The Secretin 2006, based on Rhonda Byrne’s book with the same name, created a media blitz that brought the teachings of the Law of Attraction to new heights. Many Law of Attraction teachers who were featured in the movie hit the talk show circuits promoting the movie and the law itself. Oprah, The Larry King Show, and Ellen were some of the talk shows that invited teachers who starred in the movie as their guests.

Attracting What You Want in Three Steps

Although the theory behind the Law of Attraction is very simple, putting it into practice on a conscious level takes work. Negative and limiting belief systems are buried deep inside us. Changing or ridding yourself of ideas and old habits that defeat you at every turn can be done. Are you up to the challenge?

The creative process as portrayed in the extended version of the movie The Secret involves three steps to attracting all your desires.

  1. Ask- You must know what you want. I mean, really know what you want. The universe can’t deliver without first knowing what it is that you want to have manifested into your life. 
  2. Believe- You need to truly believe that what you are asking for will become yours. Doubts need to be pushed away. The idea that failure is a possibility will mess up the delivery. 
  3. Receive – It is important that you become an active player in reaching your goals. When opportunity comes your way you must not hesitate. Grab the brass ring when it appears.
Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | 2 Comments

How to Break the Habit of Attracting Negatives

How to Break the Habit of Attracting Negatives

By Phylameana lila Desy

There is a trick to the Law of Attraction. This trick is not really as magical as one might imagine. We attract the things that we focus on. When we focus on not having enough that thought form supports the “lack of” we routinely experience.

We are forever reminded to use affirmations and to keep our thoughts positive but Feeling Sorry for Myselfcontinues to be the mantra of many people.

Sick of the n’ts in Your Vocabulary?

We are bombarded with repetitive negative phrases in our thinking such as I just can’t get ahead, I couldn’t dodge the bullet, I won’t be the winner, I don’t have enough, etc. etc. Are you guilty of continuously repeating negatives either in thoughts or words? Is your negative mind set pretty much representative of your current life situation? If your answer is YES, then Congratulations! You are living proof that the law of attraction works. You are a champion at attracting negatives.

Breaking the Habit of Attracting Negatives

Why do we focus on our illnesses, our low-paying jobs, and our less than fulfilling relationships? We do so out of habit. Breaking the “attracting negatives” habit, just like any other bad habit will take some effort on your part. Especially so, if you have been dwelling on the negatives for years. Your parents might have taught you this behavior by being the role model of “criticism” or “negative language.” If this is so, then they are likely mirroring behavior they learned from their parents, and so on back through the generations. Isn’t it time to break this negative cycle?…. urr rather, in postitive terms — IT IS time to break the cycle.

I too struggle with “negatives” in my life. I sometimes think Worry Wart has taken up permanent lodging in my guest room. I should say “unwelcome” guest room. Unwelcome guests in your life may be Unlucky Lucy, Loser Larry or Barb Bites. I’m certain you can name others. But let’s not! Let’s turn our negatives into positives and begin attracting welcome guests such as Lucky Lonnie, Smart Sam, and Happy Harriet. A simple way that you can put materializing positives into motion is to busy your hands with creating positive images for your eyes/mind to focus on.

Attracting Positives

Several years ago I created my first manifesting scrapbook. I filled the pages with affirmations and clippings of pictures that depicted the things that I wished to have materialize into my life. I spent about a week creating the various pages in the book. Then I put the book away on my bookshelf and basically forgot about it. About six months later my daughter gave me a butterfly wind chime on my birthday. Another friend of mine stopped by with an angel candle holder. Neither my friend, nor my daughter knew about my manifestation book. I had never told my daughter that I wanted a new wind chime for our back porch, let alone that I had pasted a similar butterfly wind chime in my wish book. But, sure enough, both items (wind chime and angel) were pasted in the scrapbook. The items were not exactly the same but pretty darn close. Amazing. That’s when I started pasting more and more stuff that I wanted into my manifesting scrapbook.

Creating Your Own Manifesting Scrapbook

The instructions for creating your very own manifesting book are very basic. Choose affirmative words and colorful pictures clipped from magazines. Your words and images will tell stories about what you cherish most about your life. You will also want to include the things which you wish to attract into your life. Create as many pages as you like in your manifestation scrapbook. Be sure to include photos of friends, pets, and family. Supplies needed are simple: scissors, paper, glue, magazine clippings, and favorite photos. This art project is a fun way to focus on the things that bring you joy, wellness, prosperity, and more.

Categories: Articles, Daily Posts | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,235 other followers