Daily Archives: February 2, 2011

Daily Feast, Elder Meditation, Think On These Things

  February 2 – Daily Feast

The drawback of having something go wrong is that we start believing we can’t do anything right. It is the beginning of a habit that makes us stumble where we have always stumbled. A subtle and secret conditioning sets in to make us believe we will fail – even before we start. It makes us wilt at the first sign of opposition, devastating us with criticism. It is then that we lose our grip and our good intentions – not just for the present time but for all time to come. The Cherokee learned long ago to say, “We no longer fall down when something challenges us. We no longer see ourselves as victims. But we are strong and able to overcome the most severe critic and break every habit that has kept us bound.”

~ Each day in the old times in summer and in winters, we came down to the river to bathe. This strengthened and toughened our firm skin. ~

CHIPAROPAI

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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Elder’s Meditation of the Day – February 2

“Even the seasons form a great circle in their changing, and always come back again to where they were. The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood and so it is everything where power moves.”

–Black Elk (Hehaka Sapa), OGLALA SIOUX

In these modern times it is difficult to understand why we should think circles and seasons. People and society are always moving, through distance, over yonder, going here and going there-hurry up, grow up, be successful, climb the ladder of success, etc. The Elders tell us to slow down, to be patient, pray and think circles. Circle thinking applies to relationships, business and every area of our lives. We need to teach our awareness to look for seasons and cycles.

My Creator, teach me the seasons of growth.

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‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

We are all aware of the emotional effect color creates. And for this reason we choose colors that please the eye by first pleasing the inner emotions. Certain colors have the same effect on many, while other colors affect each of us individually and in particular ways.

Red has an exciting effect; green is cool serenity. Orange is the color of vivacity, and brown tones are restful earthy colors. People dress to enhance their appearances with certain colors. Homes are decorated and offices planned to create pleasant surroundings.

And we as individuals possess moods of many colors. Yet, we are far more careless about the color of that mood, letting the attitudes and colors of others dictate to us how we are to behave. If we could remember when we meet people whose moods are black, to remind ourselves that their moods are their own, there would be less involvement in the emotions of others.

We are so vividly aware of color, we must not be reckless in recognizing the color scheme within our own personality. Whether it is a vibrant color, sophisticated, or bright and witty, color always works its subtle magic.

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Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

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The Goddess Companion

  
 
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By Patricia Monaghan

Every day, every night
that I praise the goddess,
I know I shall be safe:
I shall not be chased,
I shall not be caught,
I shall not be harmed.
Fire, sun, and moon
cannot burn me. Not
lake nor stream nor sea
can drown me. Fairy
arrow cannot pierce me.
I am safe, safe, safe,
singing her praise.
~The Shield of Brigid, Irish Prayer
 
This famous prayer was reputed to protect those who spoke it fervently from all evil. Originally an invocation to the goddess Brigid, it was later addresses to the saint who took her place and whose feast day, February 2, was the old Celtic feast of the goddess. Called Imbolc in earlier times, it became known as Candlemas, a feast of light celebrating the time when winter’s sway over this world was loosened, and spring at last beckoned.
 
The invocation was a shield against natural calamities as well as unnatural ones. For thousands of years the Irish prayed to the goddess, and then to the goddess-turned-saint, always asking for the same thing: to live out their lives in peace and plenty. Today we hope for more than just a good crop and no epidemics, good weather for harvest, and nothing to cripple our children. But is this not all we could hope for: enough to nourish us, both spiritually and physically, and people around us who love us?

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Daily Aromatherapy Tip – Dream Lover

Daily Aromatherapy Tip  - Dream Lover

Bergamot 4 drops
Clary Sage 2 drops
Rose 2 drops

Diffuse in Aromatherpy Lamp
To release fantasies and daydreams of great delight, awaken desire and passion.

From The Fragrant Veil by Elizabeth Millar
 

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Daily Aromatherapy Tip – Dream Lover

Daily Aromatherapy Tip  - Dream Lover

Bergamot 4 drops
Clary Sage 2 drops
Rose 2 drops

Diffuse in Aromatherpy Lamp
To release fantasies and daydreams of great delight, awaken desire and passion.

From The Fragrant Veil by Elizabeth Millar
 

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Pagan Studies – Candlemas / Purification /Presentation / Our Lady of Candelaria

Pagan Studies  - Candlemas / Purification /Presentation / Our Lady of Candelaria

First celebrated on February 14th, in 350 at Jerusalem, when it would have coincided with the Roman festival of Lupercalia, it was later moved up to February 2nd. Pope Sergius declared it should be celebrated with processions and candles, to commemorate Simeon’s description of the child Jesus as a light to lighten the Gentiles. Candles blessed on this day were used as a protection from evil.

This is the ostensible reason given for the Catholic custom of bringing candles to church to be blessed by the priest on February 2nd, thus the name Candle-Mass. The candles are then taken home where they serve as talismans and protections from all sorts of disasters, much like Brigid’s crosses. In Hungary, according to Dorothy Spicer, February 2nd is called Blessing of the Candle of the Happy Woman. In Poland, it is called Mother of God who Saves Us From Thunder.

Actually this festival has long been associated with fire. Spicer writes that in ancient Armenia, this was the date of Cvarntarach, a pagan spring festival in honor of Mihr, the God of fire. Originally, fires were built in his honor in open places and a lantern was lit which burned in the temple throughout the year. When Armenia became Christian, the fires were built in church courtyards instead. People danced about the flames, jumped over them and carried home embers to kindle their own fires from the sacred flames.

The motif of fire also shows up in candle processions honoring St Agatha (Feb 5) and the legends of St Brigid (Feb 1). The fire represents the spark of new life, like the seeds blessed in northern Europe on St Blaise’s Day (Feb 3) and carried home to “kindle” the existing seed.

The English have many rhymes which prognosticate about future weather based on the weather on Candlemas Day:

If Candlemas Day bring snow and rain
Winter is gone and won’t come again
If Candlemas Day be clear and bright
Winter will have another flight.

These are all similar to the American custom of predicting the weather on Groundhog’s Day, in that you don’t want the groundhog to see his shadow. In Germany, they say that the shepherd would rather see the wolf enter his stable than the sun on Candlemas Day.

The ancient Armenians used the wind to predict the weather for the coming year by watching the smoke drifting up from the bonfires lit in honor of Mihr. The Scots also observed the wind on Candlemas as recorded in this rhyme:

If this night’s wind blow south
It betokeneth warmth and growth;
If west, much milk and fish in the sea;
If north, much cold and snow there will be;
If east, the trees will bear much fruit;
If north-east, flee it, man, woman and brute.

This was also a holiday for Millers when windmills stand idle. In Crete it is said that they won’t turn even if the miller tries to start them.

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If Candlemas……

If Candlemas be fair and bright,
Winter has another flight.
If Candlemas brings clouds and rain,
Winter will not come again. 
 
 
 

If Candlemas Day is bright and clear,
There’ll be two winters in the year.

For as the sun shines on Candlemas Day,
So far will the snow swirl until May.
For as the snow blows on Candlemas Day,
So far will the sun shine before May.

If the sun shines on Groundhog Day;
Half the fuel and half the hay.

 
 
 
 

GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archive 
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Enjoy a Happy GroundHogs Day, USA

Enjoy a Happy GroundHogs Day, USA

  
Woodchuck/Marmot/Ground Hog’s Wisdom Includes:  

  
Sense of family and community
Connection to seasonal changes
Understands the power of cycles
Ability to hibernate (sleep) during hard times
Protection from floods
Ability to go underground when trouble arises 

  
 
 Resources : GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives 
 
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February 2

February 2
Bonza Bottler Day
Brew Hog Day
Candlemas
Dia de la Candelaria (Mexico)
Feast of Pan
Feast of Torches
Groundhog Day
Lupercalia
National Heavenly Hash Day
Presentation of Our Lord (fka the Purification of the Virgin Mary)
Purification Day
Shaving of the Candlemas Bear Masque (Pyrenees)
St. Joan de Lestonnac’s Day
Wand Dedication Day (Fairy)
Wives’ Feast Day
Yuma Crossing Day
 

© 1999 Mara Freeman 

GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast

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